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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 11 December 2006

Charlie Brooker and Coral Sirdifield

Approximately 90% of prisoners experience mental health problems, substance misuse problems or both. However, prison reception screening tools are not always effective in…

Abstract

Approximately 90% of prisoners experience mental health problems, substance misuse problems or both. However, prison reception screening tools are not always effective in enabling staff to identify mentally disordered prisoners. Therefore, to ensure that these individuals get access to appropriate care, custodial staff should be trained in recognising the signs and symptoms of mental health disorders, and in effectively working with these individuals. This paper charts the pilot implementation of a mental health awareness workbook designed for use in custodial settings across England. It examines the variety of approaches adopted to implement the workbook, staff views on the usefulness of the workbook, and barriers to implementation encountered in each area. Recommendations made for best practice in delivering the workbook in other areas suggest a need for changes to its format, but also that time should be ring‐fenced for staff to participate in this training, in groups led by experts such as in‐reach team members.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Cathy Carpmael, Steve Morgan and Jan Nichols

Library orientation in Bristol Polytechnic was reappraised and thedecision taken to develop a workbook as a potential alternative to thelibrary induction tour and evaluate…

Abstract

Library orientation in Bristol Polytechnic was reappraised and the decision taken to develop a workbook as a potential alternative to the library induction tour and evaluate its effectiveness. Describes the project and the workbook. Outlines its implementation and evaluation and analyses the educational benefits of the workbook approach.

Details

Library Review, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2022

Lauren Wilson and Rebekah Dervley

This paper aims to explore the use of low intensity in-cell workbooks within a psychological therapies service for male prisoners, an intervention adapted for use during…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the use of low intensity in-cell workbooks within a psychological therapies service for male prisoners, an intervention adapted for use during the COVID-19 pandemic. It seeks to explore the effectiveness of the intervention in reducing psychological distress, explore individuals’ progression through the service following engagement with the workbooks and, finally, to understand individual’s experiences of the intervention through evaluating feedback provided.

Design/methodology/approach

CORE-10 scores from 66 male prisoners at a Category C prison were evaluated pre and post completion of an adapted in-cell workbook intervention, to explore the potential effectiveness of the intervention in reducing psychological distress. Qualitative feedback given by participants was also explored to understand individual’s experiences of engaging with the intervention.

Findings

Evaluation of 66 male prisoners revealed significant reductions in psychological distress on the CORE-10. Findings demonstrated that over half of men included in the evaluation were “stepped-up” for further interventions as per the stepped-care treatment model. Feedback forms highlighted the value of the therapeutic relationship and a “something versus nothing” approach.

Research limitations/implications

The paper considers several limitations to the research approach, of which future studies should seek to explore when carrying out similar research.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for the use of low intensity self-help interventions in prison psychological services, during a time when the provision of face-to-face interventions was limited due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Originality/value

The paper explores the use of self-help materials in psychological treatment settings, of which there is very little research on in prisons. In addition, the paper contributes to the body of research on psychological well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

Jan Nichols

Following the Library induction/orientation process at theUniversity of the West of England, Bristol in the autumn term of 1990,it was recognized on both educational and…

Abstract

Following the Library induction/orientation process at the University of the West of England, Bristol in the autumn term of 1990, it was recognized on both educational and practical grounds that re‐appraisal was necessary. The result of this re‐appraisal was the development of a workbook with a flexible format, enabling it to be used with students from each of the eight faculties. The workbook programme was evaluated quantitatively (by questionnaire) and qualitatively (by meetings) and a number of recommendations made. Students expressed how much they had benefited by working together in small groups. It was decided to foster this approach of collaborative enquiry in the design of a series of shorter guides, workbooks and worksheets which were used by the Bristol Business School librarian for the induction/orientation programme in the autumn of 1992. The alternative programmes were evaluated qualitatively from student groups and from enquiries desk staff, with extremely positive results from both groups.

Details

Library Review, vol. 42 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2022

Rebecca Conlan-Trant, Paula Connolly, Alison O’Sullivan, Anurag Nasa, Mary Sammon and Lauren Alexander

Sleep disturbance is a common difficulty in the general population. It has become particularly prevalent in the context of disruption to routine brought about by the…

Abstract

Purpose

Sleep disturbance is a common difficulty in the general population. It has become particularly prevalent in the context of disruption to routine brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of this study was to trial a patient-guided “sleep workbook” intervention, which was developed by multidisciplinary team members, combining principles of sleep hygiene education and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia behavioural strategies, and to evaluate its efficacy in a mixed-methods study.

Design/methodology/approach

Service users of the community mental health service were invited to participate. A total of 30 service users agreed to participate. A total of 15 participants completed both the intervention and the mixed-methods survey. Four participated in the focus group. Descriptive and inferential statistics were performed on the collected quantitative data. A thematic analysis was carried out of qualitative survey responses and focus group discourse.

Findings

There was a statistically and clinically significant improvement in quantity and quality of sleep following intervention. Mean hours of sleep prior to the intervention was 4.4 hours [standard deviation (SD) = 2.2], compared to 6.1 hours (SD = 2.2) afterwards (p = 0.003). Quality of sleep improved from a mean of 2.5 (SD = 2.1) to 6.1 (SD = 2.3) following the intervention (p = <0.001). Four themes were developed using the qualitative data: “under-recognition of sleep difficulties”, “ruminations”, “practical utility” and “therapeutic autonomy”.

Originality/value

There is a growing need for occupational therapists and clinicians to provide interventions for patients with sleep difficulties and to develop sleep management practice. This patient-guided sleep workbook may be an effective intervention for these patients.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Lynnette Bailey and Martin Jenkins

The Cheltenham and Gloucester College of Higher Education has usedan information skills workbook as part of its first year students′transferable skills programme since…

442

Abstract

The Cheltenham and Gloucester College of Higher Education has used an information skills workbook as part of its first year students′ transferable skills programme since 1990. Describes and evaluates changes to the workbook which have been influenced by new learning and teaching styles, by increased student numbers and by the introduction of a modular degree scheme. Concludes with a look at lessons learned.

Details

Library Review, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1993

Roger Brooksbank

Provides a practical self‐help guide for professional salespeoplewho want to improve their sales performance. Divided into two parts,Part 1 deals with booking the…

Abstract

Provides a practical self‐help guide for professional salespeople who want to improve their sales performance. Divided into two parts, Part 1 deals with booking the appointment and Part 2 with making the sale. Part 1 covers areas such as how to add structure to telephone calls; the development of a personalized script designed to provide a more consistent pattern of high performance; and how to generate both more and better quality appointments. Part 2 covers the skills required in selling face‐to‐face and covers how to analyse the key components of the sales presentation; restructure, strengthen and inject fresh ideas; rebuild the presentation so as to maximize sales performance; and how to take full control of personal development as a sales professional. Based on established principles of successful selling, the workbook outlines a model of the selling process based on the five core skill areas of opening, probing, matching, closing and objection handling. Aimed at salespeople and sales managers, the model provides a framework for the ongoing development of sales skills which is highly practical and applicable to any face‐to‐face selling situation. Also contains a comprehensive series of worksheets to complete on each of the issues raised; and a series of “windows” provide condensed information for quick reference.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 11 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Andy Neely, John Mills, Ken Platts, Huw Richards, Mike Gregory, Mike Bourne and Mike Kennerley

Describes the development and testing of a structured methodology for the design of performance measurement systems. Frameworks, such as the balanced scorecard and the…

27859

Abstract

Describes the development and testing of a structured methodology for the design of performance measurement systems. Frameworks, such as the balanced scorecard and the performance prism, have been proposed, but until recently little attention has been devoted to the question of how these frameworks can be populated, i.e. how managers can decide specifically which measures to adopt. Following a wide ranging review of the performance measurement literature, a framework identifying the desirable characteristics of a performance measurement system design process is developed. This framework provided guidelines which were subsequently used to inform the development of a process‐based approach to performance measurement system design. The process was enhanced and refined during application in three action research projects, involving major UK automotive and aerospace companies. The revised process was then formally documented and tested through six further industrial applications. Finally the process was written up in the form of a workbook and made publicly available.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 20 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-868-1

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Win Tadd and Paul Dieppe

This paper describes the creation of the educational materials developed as part of the Dignity and Older Europeans Project. Following a discussion of the development…

Abstract

This paper describes the creation of the educational materials developed as part of the Dignity and Older Europeans Project. Following a discussion of the development process, the materials themselves are described. The materials includes a poster of the dignity balance, which contains five core messages and illustrates the impact of both enhancing and violating individual dignity. The second product is a leaflet that also includes the dignity balance and lists of actions and approaches that will promote dignity or result in indignity. The final product to date is a multidisciplinary workbook which is described in some detail. The workbook Educating for Dignity provides a brief outline of the theoretical model of dignity, and four different sections based on the empirical findings:• understanding dignity• old age ‐ what is it like to be an older person?• dignity in care• the impact of the system.In each section quotations from participants, supplemented with images and cartoons, are used to illustrate various aspects of dignity. Readers are then set exercises to promote reflection about the issues raised. The workbook also contains a discussion of the exercises, an extensive bibliography and some policy implications. Finally, dissemination and use of the materials are explored.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000