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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Elizelle J. Cilliers, Emma Diemont, Derk‐Jan Stobbelaar and Wim Timmermans

Amersfoort Local Municipality implemented the workbench spatial quality method (referred to as workbench method) to enhance participation in green‐planning processes.

Abstract

Purpose

Amersfoort Local Municipality implemented the workbench spatial quality method (referred to as workbench method) to enhance participation in green‐planning processes.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of the Valuing Attractive Landscapes in the Urban Economy project (made possible by INTERREG IVB North West Europe, European Regional Development Fund, European Territorial Cooperation, 2007‐2013), the method was evaluated based on its contribution to three core issues: understanding the value of green spaces; identifying these values; and planning for the enhancement of thereof.

Findings

Based on case studies conducted in Amersfoort, The Netherlands, this interactive method invites people to think about the use and experience values of spatial aspects and rate them according to importance and vulnerability. The method focuses on participatory planning and quality identification.

Research limitations/implications

Assessment of the value of green space will differ between users, experts and between locations.

Practical implications

Meaningful participation processes enhance the sustainability and feasibility of urban development projects, as it captures the real use values and enhances green‐planning initiatives.

Social implications

The workbench method is a communication tool that enhances social perspectives, social responsibility and awareness of values.

Originality/value

The workbench method stresses the need for participatory processes and the added value that these processes can have on urban development and future green‐planning initiatives. It furthermore identifies adequate ways of approaching participation to ensure successful implementation thereof. The workbench method report 2009 as compiled by the University of Applied Sciences Van Hall Larenstein contains all details and data of the study evaluating the workbench method in terms of stakeholder identification and level of involvement of these stakeholders.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2013

Elizelle Juaneé Cilliers and Wim Timmermans

The purpose of this paper is to link economic value to urban green spaces to enhance the value of green urban spaces, along with the added benefit it can offer to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to link economic value to urban green spaces to enhance the value of green urban spaces, along with the added benefit it can offer to the urban environment.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of the VALUE project (Valuing Attractive Landscapes in the Urban Economy, made possible by INTERREG IVB North West Europe, European Regional Development Fund, European Territorial Cooperation, 2007‐2013), this development approach was designed to enhance the planning of qualitative urban spaces by linking an economic value to green urban spaces, to enhance value and meaning.

Findings

Based on case studies conducted in The Netherlands, the approach proves that by linking an economic value to green urban spaces, space is considered differently, authorities tend to prioritize these spaces and additional spinoffs realize.

Research limitations/implications

The notion of green‐value is subjective and differs between users, experts and between locations.

Practical implications

The paper provides local authorities with a new approach to spatial planning, considering the economic value of green urban spaces.

Social implications

The paper transforms the way in which green urban spaces are valued and planned; by realizing the intrinsic value of green urban spaces, in terms of social, environmental and economic benefit.

Originality/value

The Value Added Planning approach stresses the need for qualitative planning processes that will enhance future economic value and sustainable development initiatives. The green environment is hard to quantify in terms of economic value, but it is this intrinsic value that can provide future benefit and sustainability in terms of place management and development.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Cathy Parker

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2010

E.J. Cilliers, E. Diemont, D.J. Stobbelaar and W. Timmermans

The Green Credit Tool is evaluated as a method to quantify the value of green‐spaces and to determine how these green‐space‐values can be replaced or compensated for…

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2614

Abstract

Purpose

The Green Credit Tool is evaluated as a method to quantify the value of green‐spaces and to determine how these green‐space‐values can be replaced or compensated for within urban spatial planning projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Amersfoort Local Municipality created the Green Credit Tool to ensure protection and enhancement of the urban green totality. The tool is described and evaluated based on three core elements: the value matrix, the collection of values and green compensation. Findings were based on case studies in Parkweelde and Randerbroek (Amersfoort, The Netherlands).

Findings

Green‐planning is not just about flora and fauna, but also about planning for economic benefits and thus needs to have a quantifiable value. The Green Credit Tool enhances integrated green‐planning by means of the value matrix (identifying values of green), collecting values (participation and stakeholder‐identification) and compensation (protecting green spaces).

Research limitations/implications

Assessment of green values will differ between users, experts and between locations.

Practical implications

The Green Credit Tool introduces a different perspective to green‐spaces that can add value to urban environments and thus creates economic spin‐offs. It stresses the need for environmental issues to play a greater role in future planning processes.

Social implications

Green‐planning is known to have various psychological benefits. The Green Credit Tool is a communication tool and thus incorporates public opinions, enhances social responsibility and enhances awareness of the broader benefits of green spaces.

Originality/value

The Green Credit Tool creates an integrated approach towards the planning of green‐spaces, enhancing the value of green areas and thus ensuring qualitative urban planning and sustainable economic development.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Chengjun Chen, Zhongke Tian, Dongnian Li, Lieyong Pang, Tiannuo Wang and Jun Hong

This study aims to monitor and guide the assembly process. The operators need to change the assembly process according to the products’ specifications during manual…

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148

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to monitor and guide the assembly process. The operators need to change the assembly process according to the products’ specifications during manual assembly of mass customized production. Traditional information inquiry and display methods, such as manual lookup of assembly drawings or electronic manuals, are inefficient and error-prone.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes a projection-based augmented reality system (PBARS) for assembly guidance and monitoring. The system includes a projection method based on viewpoint tracking, in which the position of the operator’s head is tracked and the projection images are changed correspondingly. The assembly monitoring phase applies a method for parts recognition. First, the pixel local binary pattern (PX-LBP) operator is achieved by merging the classical LBP operator with the pixel classification process. Afterward, the PX-LBP features of the depth images are extracted and the randomized decision forests classifier is used to get the pixel classification prediction image (PCPI). Parts recognition and assembly monitoring is performed by PCPI analysis.

Findings

The projection image changes with the viewpoint of the human body, hence the operators always perceive the three-dimensional guiding scene from different viewpoints, improving the human-computer interaction. Part recognition and assembly monitoring were achieved by comparing the PCPIs, in which missing and erroneous assembly can be detected online.

Originality/value

This paper designed the PBARS to monitor and guide the assembly process simultaneously, with potential applications in mass customized production. The parts recognition and assembly monitoring based on pixels classification provides a novel method for assembly monitoring.

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

Eugenia Smyrnova-Trybulska, Nataliia Morze, Olena Kuzminska and Piet Kommers

This paper aims to describe the popular trends and methods and ICT tools used for mapping and visualization of scientific domains as a research methodology which is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the popular trends and methods and ICT tools used for mapping and visualization of scientific domains as a research methodology which is attracting more and more interest from scientific information and science studies professionals. Science mapping or bibliometric mapping is a spatial representation of how disciplines, fields, specialties and individual documents or authors. The researchers analysed Bibexel, Pajek, VOSViewer, programmes used for processing and visualization of bibliographic and bibliometric data, within the framework of the implementation of IRNet research network project and activities and presented several examples of visualisation.

Design/methodology/approach

Among the main indicators of research effectiveness – bibliometric indicators – is a powerful information tool to support the development of science. Practical research methods were prepared using the programs: Bibexel (metadata analyses), program Pajek: graph editing and visualization of the graph structure of co-authorship – using the method of Kamada-Kawai and VOSviewer: a computer program for creating maps based on network data and for visualizing and exploring these maps. The main features of VOSviewer can be summarized for creating maps based on network data, visualizing and exploring maps.

Findings

The cited references and keywords are used to analyse in particular the intellectual base used by the research field or to analyse documents that cite the same references.

Originality/value

The authors of the paper, who are researchers of the European IRNet project and international research network, described and analysed certain bibliographic results of these activities using methods of mapping and visualization of scientific domains.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2020

Shiqing Wu, Zhonghou Wang, Bin Shen, Jia-Hai Wang and Li Dongdong

The purpose of this study is to achieve multi-variety and small-batch assembly through direct cooperation between equipment and people and to improve assembly efficiency…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to achieve multi-variety and small-batch assembly through direct cooperation between equipment and people and to improve assembly efficiency as well as flexibility.

Design/methodology/approach

Firstly, the concept of the human–computer interaction is designed. Secondly, the machine vision technology is studied theoretically. Skin color filter based on hue, saturation and value color model is put forward to screen out images that meet the skin color characteristics of the worker, and a multi-Gaussian weighted model is built to separate moving objects from its background. Both of them are combined to obtain the final images of the target objects. Then, the key technology is applied to the smart assembly workbench. Finally, experiments are conducted to evaluate the role of the human–computer interaction features in improving productivity for the smart assembly workbench.

Findings

The result shows that multi-variety and small-batch considerable increases assembly time and the developed human–computer interaction features, including prompting and introduction, effectively decrease assembly time.

Originality/value

This study proves that the machine vision technology studied in this paper can effectively eliminate the interferences of the environment to obtain the target image. By adopting the human–computer interaction features, including prompting and introduction, the efficiency of manual operation is improved greatly, especially for multi-variety and small-batch assembly.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Wei Sun, Xiaokai Mu, Qingchao Sun, Zhiyong Sun and Xiaobang Wang

This paper aims to comprehensively achieve the requirements of high assembly precision and low cost, a precision-cost model of assembly based on three-dimensional (3D…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to comprehensively achieve the requirements of high assembly precision and low cost, a precision-cost model of assembly based on three-dimensional (3D) tolerance is established in this paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The assembly precision is related to the tolerance of parts and the deformation of matching surfaces under load. In this paper, the small displacement torsor (SDT) theory is first utilized to analyze the manufacturing tolerances of parts and the assembly deformation deviation of matching surface. In the meanwhile, the extracting method of SDT parameters is proposed and the assembly precision calculation model based on the 3D tolerance is established. Second, an integrated optimization model based on the machining cost, assembly cost (mapping the deviation domain to the SDT domain) and quality loss cost is built. Finally, the practicability of the precision-cost model is verified by optimizing the horizontal machining center.

Findings

The assembly deviation has a great influence on cost fluctuation. By setting the optimization objective to maximize the assembly precision, the optimal total cost is CNY 72.77, decreasing by 16.83 per cent from the initial value, which meets economical requirements. Meanwhile, the upper bound of each processing tolerance is close to the maximum value of 0.01 mm, indicating that the load deformation can be offset by appropriately increasing the upper bound of the tolerance, but it is necessary to strictly restrict the manufacturing tolerances of lower parts in a reasonable range.

Originality/value

In this paper, a 3D deviation precision-cost model of assembly is established, which can describe the assembly precision more accurately and achieve a lower cost compared with the assembly precision model based on rigid parts.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Yuezong Wang, Jinghui Liu, Mengfei Guo and LiuQIan Wang

A three-dimensional (3D) printing error simulation approach is proposed to analyze the influence of tilted vertical beams on the 3D printing accuracy. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

A three-dimensional (3D) printing error simulation approach is proposed to analyze the influence of tilted vertical beams on the 3D printing accuracy. The purpose of this study is to analyze the influence of such errors on printing accuracy and printing quality for delta-robot 3D printer.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the kinematic model of a delta-robot 3D printer with an ideal geometric structure is proposed by using vector analysis. Then, the normal kinematic model of a nonideal delta-robot 3D robot with tilted vertical beams is derived based on the above ideal kinematic model. Finally, a 3D printing error simulation approach is proposed to analyze the influence of tilted vertical beams on the 3D printing accuracy.

Findings

The results show that tilted vertical beams can indeed cause 3D printing errors and further influence the 3D printing quality of the final products and that the 3D printing errors of tilted vertical beams are related to the rotation angles of the tilted vertical beams. The larger the rotation angles of the tilted vertical beams are, the greater the geometric deformations of the printed structures.

Originality/value

Three vertical beams and six horizontal beams constitute the supporting parts of the frame of a delta-robot 3D printer. In this paper, the orientations of tilted vertical beams are shown to have a significant influence on 3D printing accuracy. However, the effect of tilted vertical beams on 3D printing accuracy is difficult to capture by instruments. To reveal the 3D printing error mechanisms under the condition of tilted vertical beams, the error generation mechanism and the quantitative influence of tilted vertical beams on 3D printing accuracy are studied by simulating the parallel motion mechanism of a delta-robot 3D printer with tilted vertical beams.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 27 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2019

Xiao Li, Hongtai Cheng and Xiaoxiao Liang

Learning from demonstration (LfD) provides an intuitive way for non-expert persons to teach robots new skills. However, the learned motion is typically fixed for a given…

Abstract

Purpose

Learning from demonstration (LfD) provides an intuitive way for non-expert persons to teach robots new skills. However, the learned motion is typically fixed for a given scenario, which brings serious adaptiveness problem for robots operating in the unstructured environment, such as avoiding an obstacle which is not presented during original demonstrations. Therefore, the robot should be able to learn and execute new behaviors to accommodate the changing environment. To achieve this goal, this paper aims to propose an improved LfD method which is enhanced by an adaptive motion planning technique.

Design/methodology/approach

The LfD is based on GMM/GMR method, which can transform original off-line demonstrations into a compressed probabilistic model and recover robot motion based on the distributions. The central idea of this paper is to reshape the probabilistic model according to on-line observation, which is realized by the process of re-sampling, data partition, data reorganization and motion re-planning. The re-planned motions are not unique. A criterion is proposed to evaluate the fitness of each motion and optimize among the candidates.

Findings

The proposed method is implemented in a robotic rope disentangling task. The results show that the robot is able to complete its task while avoiding randomly distributed obstacles and thereby verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. The main contributions of the proposed method are avoiding unforeseen obstacles in the unstructured environment and maintaining crucial aspects of the motion which guarantee to accomplish a skill/task successfully.

Originality/value

Traditional methods are intrinsically based on motion planning technique and treat the off-line training data as a priori probability. The paper proposes a novel data-driven solution to achieve motion planning for LfD. When the environment changes, the off-line training data are revised according to external constraints and reorganized to generate new motion. Compared to traditional methods, the novel data-driven solution is concise and efficient.

Details

Industrial Robot: the international journal of robotics research and application, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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