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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2017

Sizwe Timothy Phakathi

This chapter discusses the miners’ informal working strategy of making a plan (planisa) in context of the relationship between teamwork training that was provided to the…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the miners’ informal working strategy of making a plan (planisa) in context of the relationship between teamwork training that was provided to the mining teams above the ground and its implementation in the underground mining workplace. The training programme was essentially about empowering and transforming frontline mining teams to self-directed work teams (SDWT) to understand the gold-mining business through the eyes of management. Its aim was to create new kinds of mineworkers who understood the what, how and why of the twenty-first-century mining business. AfricaGold sought to restructure the underground workplace through SDWT training in order to create a congenial, humane, democratic and more meaningful form of work processes, which permitted the mining teams to have greater flexibility in the production tasks they performed. The chapter reveals that the SDWT training seemed to have motivated the mining teams. Interestingly enough, this motivation tended to prevail even in situations of production bottlenecks. At the heart of this motivation was the miners’ organisational practice of making a plan. It is arguable that the SDWT training enhanced the desire of the mining work teams to make a plan in response to production blockages and managerial inefficiencies. This is essentially what the training aimed to do – to create new kinds of frontline mineworkers who are committed to achieving the productivity goals of a modern mining workplace. Ironically, the management of production did not seem to complement the inspiration and energy that the training instilled in the minds and hearts of the mining teams.

Details

Production, Safety and Teamwork in a Deep-Level Mining Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-564-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Camelo‐Ordaz Carmen, Fernández‐Alles María de la Luz and Martínez‐Fierro Salustiano

This work has three main objectives – to analyse whether the strategic vision of the top management team (TMT) directly affects firms' innovation performance; to shed some…

Abstract

Purpose

This work has three main objectives – to analyse whether the strategic vision of the top management team (TMT) directly affects firms' innovation performance; to shed some light on which of the intrinsic characteristics of work teams proposed in the literature influence innovation; and to analyse the joint effect that the TMT's vision and the work team's characteristics may exert on innovation performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample for this study was chosen from the Dun & Bradstreet database. The population consists of firms with more than 50 employees belonging to the three sectors of the Spanish economy with the largest number of registered patents according to statistics from the Spanish Office of Patents and Brands (960 firms).

Findings

The results indicate that the TMT's strategic vision alone does not explain companies' innovation performance. Innovation also requires the existence of diverse, cohesive, and autonomous work teams whose members engage in fluent informal communication.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical evidence demonstrates the complexity of the innovation performance that has to be encouraged by the TMT, but also supported by the existence of teams with specific characteristics.

Practical implications

These results offer relevant implications for R&D managers about the way teams should be formed to increase innovation. The paper derives some conclusions about the key characteristics of work teams that, in combination with the view of the TMT, can affect innovation in firms.

Originality/value

The majority of earlier studies have analysed theoretically the effect of both variables – the strategic vision of the TMT and the intrinsic characteristics of teams – on innovation, but separately. This paper analyses the joint effects that the intrinsic characteristics of work teams have on innovation, which resolve some contradictions regarding the way some variables affect innovation of the firm. Finally the results offer empirical evidence on how Spanish firms obtain innovation performances.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Francisco Gil, Carlos‐María Alcover and José‐María Peiró

This introductory paper aims to provide a contextualization of recent research and applications on work team effectiveness in organizational contexts carried out in Spain…

Abstract

Purpose

This introductory paper aims to provide a contextualization of recent research and applications on work team effectiveness in organizational contexts carried out in Spain and Portugal and to describe connections between this research and the main trends in the international scene.

Design/methodology/approach

Since the 1990s, new occupational and organizational realities have deepened scientific interest in work teams in both Spain and Portugal. A range of recently published (1992‐2004) works in this area are reviewed. The selected sources are papers published in Spanish, Portuguese and international journals.

Findings

Reviewing this work, four major trends are identified that synthesize the key concerns of researches in both countries: work teams and new information/communication technologies; intra‐ and inter‐group conflicts in organizational contexts; definition, dimensions and measurement criteria for work team effectiveness; and teams in innovation and change processes.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils a panoramic vision of this research area in both Spain and Portugal, and provides an overview of the papers included in this special issue and an outlook for the future.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 20 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2018

Daniela Pinheiro dos Reis and Katia Puente-Palacios

The purpose of this study was to identify the explanatory power of the affective, cognitive and evaluative aspects of identity with work teams in predicting team…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to identify the explanatory power of the affective, cognitive and evaluative aspects of identity with work teams in predicting team effectiveness, represented by the variables: satisfaction with the team, manager-assessed team performance and objective indicators of performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 131 work teams of a Brazilian public organization with units in all state capitals of the country. Work team identity scale, the work team satisfaction scale, the team performance scale and objective performance indicators collected based on the achievement of the goals set for the units that make up the organization were used. To test the predictive model, three regressions were conducted using the stepwise method.

Findings

Regression analysis results showed that the evaluative dimension explains about 6% of the performance assessment given by managers, whereas the affective dimension explains 63% of the satisfaction with work teams. No significant results were found for the objective performance indicators.

Originality/value

The observed findings demonstrate the pertinence of understanding the work team identity as a collective and multidimensional phenomenon, as well as the contribution of its different components in explaining variables that represent effectiveness.

Details

RAUSP Management Journal, vol. 54 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2531-0488

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

Kathy O. Roper and Deborah R. Phillips

To present the advantages and possible deterrents of self‐managed work teams, and offer recommendations on ways to integrate these teams into project management.

Abstract

Purpose

To present the advantages and possible deterrents of self‐managed work teams, and offer recommendations on ways to integrate these teams into project management.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of works, which provide a description and practical advice about self‐managed work teams, are reviewed in an effort to provide a thorough picture of self‐managed work teams. The information is sorted into sections: history of self‐managed work teams; self‐managed work teams: a definition; characteristics of self‐managed work teams; the role of emotional intelligence in self‐managed work teams; developing and empowering the team; barriers to successful self‐managed work teams; factors to consider before forming a self‐managed work team; and the longevity of self‐managed work teams.

Findings

Integrates theories and findings from other works to offer a holistic view of self‐managed work teams in today's workplace.

Research limitations/implications

Resources from USA, as well as European writings, were analyzed to bring global perspectives. Applications are not specific to FM or construction, but business in general.

Practical implications

A useful source for project managers or other managers considering implementing self‐managed work teams to increase productivity and employee morale.

Originality/value

Takes an integrated approach in exploring all areas of self‐managed work teams, including emotional intelligence. Provides useful information on integrating self‐managed work teams in project management.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2018

Michela Vignoli, Marco Depolo, Manuels Cifuentes and Laura Punnett

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how disagreement between supervisors and their subordinates on leadership style (transformational and transactional) is related to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how disagreement between supervisors and their subordinates on leadership style (transformational and transactional) is related to employees’ outcomes, considering both work team characteristics (social support and conflict), and employees’ well-being (burnout, work engagement and poor health). The role played by the size of the work team is also analysed.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample is composed of 24 supervisors and 468 employees working in grocery stores of a large retail chain; 369 employees worked in 14 medium-size work teams and 99 employees worked in small-size work teams. Disagreement on leadership style between supervisors and their subordinates has been computed as the difference between the score reported by the supervisor and the score reported by the worker on the same items. Linear regression analyses, ANOVA and multilevel analyses have been computed.

Findings

Multilevel analyses results showed that, considering the disagreement on transformational and transactional leadership style and the work team size, only disagreement on the transformational leadership style is related to employees’ outcomes. Higher clustering effects, meaning that the between-groups variability was bigger than the variability within groups, have been found in conflict between members and burnout. Furthermore, results showed that work team size moderated the relationship between disagreement on transformational leadership style and burnout.

Practical implications

In order to enhance workers’ well-being and produce a better working climate it could be useful to focus on reducing the disagreement on leadership style between leaders and theirs subordinates.

Originality/value

Disagreement between supervisors and their subordinates, in order to understand the role played by leadership on work team characteristics and workers’ well-being, has rarely been studied before.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

M. Angeles Escriba‐Moreno and M. Teresa Canet‐Giner

The main goal of the work presented here is the study and comparative analysis of the changes that take place in the structure of organizations when managers decide to…

Abstract

Purpose

The main goal of the work presented here is the study and comparative analysis of the changes that take place in the structure of organizations when managers decide to establish work teams in the context of quality management. It can be observed that team characteristics change and adapt to evolving management programs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors selected a qualitative research method, in particular the case study methodology. The comparative analysis of organizational changes was analyzed in three different business units that had implanted advanced quality management programs using work teams.

Findings

There is a relationship between the quality management approach and the degree of integration of the teams into the organizational structure; when the quality approach is an advanced TQM approach, teams are more integrated into the organizational structure. Results show that a reduction of hierarchical levels in the organizational structures favors the integration of work teams and vice versa. It also facilitates effective development of the teams.

Practical implications

As a result of the findings, supervision should be reduced and a great deal of autonomy and resources should be assigned to teams. In any case, the existence of linkage positions (a leader or facilitator that forms a part of the team) makes the required supervision easier and more flexible.

Originality/value

The paper shows that significant organizational changes requiring different uses of design variables can be obtained with the simultaneous establishment of TQM programs and work teams. The paper is relevant to managers attempting to use teams as an effective asset for obtaining the competitive advantage of their firms.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Celia Zárraga and Juan Manuel García‐Falcón

Knowledge management is an activity that has generated great interest in the business world recently. We conceive this activity as the process through which organizational…

Abstract

Knowledge management is an activity that has generated great interest in the business world recently. We conceive this activity as the process through which organizational knowledge is created from the individual knowledge of the members of the firm. A variety of contributions on the topic have indicated that organization in work teams is a suitable structure for putting that process into practice. However, we know that this alone is not sufficient. Therefore, in this study, we deal with the analysis of the conditions or characteristics that the work teams should have in order to be true centers of knowledge management. Based on a review of the literature and on the evidence provided by a quantitative empirical study, we obtain a list of factors favoring the process, in order of relative importance. Moreover, we distinguish between those that more deeply favor the creation of individual knowledge and those most suitable for inducing the transfer and integration of that knowledge.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Katrin Leifels and Paul Bowen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between cultural diversity in teams and team members' individual well-being. The paper further explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between cultural diversity in teams and team members' individual well-being. The paper further explores the relationship between social resources, social stressors, team member well-being and the influence of the type of team individuals are working in (mono- vs. multicultural), gender and individualism/collectivism (IC).

Design/methodology/approach

Using data collected via an online survey, the authors analyzed 659 responses from individuals working in mono- and multicultural work teams. A theoretical model explaining the influence of social stressors, social resources, and social and demographic variables was proposed and tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that members of multicultural work teams perceive significantly more social stressors and lower levels of social resources than do members of monocultural teams. Higher levels of social stressors suggest decreased psychological well-being, while social resources have an indirect positive effect on psychological well-being. Furthermore, personal characteristics, namely, individualism and gender, have direct effects on the perception of social stressors and indirect effects on team member well-being.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates that cultural diversity in teams can influence the social stressors and resources that individual team members experience. Moreover, the pivotal role of social resources in the facilitation of team member well-being is highlighted primarily through its direct effect on social stressors and its concomitant indirect effect on well-being.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Charles M. Carson, Don C. Mosley and Scott L. Boyar

This paper explores the role of individual goal orientation on the self‐management work process and how individual goal orientation may impact self‐managed work team

Abstract

This paper explores the role of individual goal orientation on the self‐management work process and how individual goal orientation may impact self‐managed work team (SMWT) effectiveness. Supervisory encouragement, team member goal orientation, and work team behaviors are included in a conceptual model of work team effectiveness. Propositions addressing the relationships between goal orientation, encouraging supervisory behaviors, and self‐managed work team effectiveness are offered and practical implications addressing the usage of goal orientation as a selection tool for self‐managed work teams and the need for external supervisors to encourage certain work team behaviors to promote work team effectiveness are discussed.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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