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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

David Gijbels, Isabel Raemdonck, Dries Vervecken and Jonas Van Herck

A central issue in the field of workplace learning is how work‐related learning can be stimulated so that a powerful learning work environment is created. This paper seeks…

Abstract

Purpose

A central issue in the field of workplace learning is how work‐related learning can be stimulated so that a powerful learning work environment is created. This paper seeks to further enlarge understanding on this issue. Based on the demand‐control‐support the aim is to investigate the influence of job‐characteristics on the work‐related learning behaviour of the worker such as job demands, job control, social support at work on the one hand and self‐directed learning orientation on the other.

Design/methodology/approach

The study took place in the ICT‐department of a large company in Flanders. By means of an online questionnaire, all employees of the ICT‐department were asked to complete this questionnaire, which, apart from general information on the participants (age, gender, prior education, etc.), consisted of statements on five scales (job demands, job control, social support, self‐directed learning orientation, and work‐related learning behaviour) adapted from validated instruments. There was a total of 73 participants (response rate of 52 per cent, 73 per cent men, 27 per cent women, age varying from 20‐51 years old). In addition, all scales had Cronbach's alpha values above 0.79. Relations between the variables under study were tested using the Pearson correlation. The predictive value of the variables for the variance in work‐related learning was tested using the enter method of a multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The regression analyses show that job demands and job control were moderately positive and significantly linked with work‐related learning behaviour. Social support did not show a significant positive correlation with work‐related learning at all. Self‐directed learning orientation on the contrary had a strong and positive relation with work‐related learning. The results of the linear regression analyses indicated that only the self‐directed learning orientation scale significantly predicted the work‐related learning behaviour.

Originality/value

The study is one of the few investigations that takes into account both the role of personal and workplace‐related variables in order to better understand work‐related learning. The results stress that personal related variables such as self‐regulated learning orientation need to be taken into account in further research and in the daily practice of human resources development.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Josephine H. Lappia

The purpose of the study is to produce design guidelines based on insights from both practice and theory that will enable teachers and educational developers to execute…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to produce design guidelines based on insights from both practice and theory that will enable teachers and educational developers to execute the design, implementation and evaluation of their work‐related learning arrangements with stakeholders involved.

Design/methodology/approach

The first study reported in this paper can be characterised as an exploratory design study. The second and third study can be described as design‐oriented research.

Findings

The case studies showed that to realize work related learning arrangements mutual understanding between stakeholders is needed to decide what has to be learned by the students and to create learning situations that have a high similarity with real working situations.

Research limitations/implications

The ultimate evaluation question whether students indeed show high levels of learning outcomes on the levels of the framework when they followed work‐related learning arrangements that are arranged according to the design guidelines, fall out of the scope of this paper.

Practical implications

Factors that influence the intended and implemented design of work related arrangements are derived from practical and theoretical insights. Design guidelines to influence these factors in a positive direction are formulated, based on these insights. For the expected learning outcomes a dynamic framework is developed.

Social implications

Work related learning arrangements are still rare in higher education and practical experience is generally only gained during short periods of internships. So the finding that learning by experience and social interaction and learning by theory and reflection should be combined in joint work related learning arrangements to obtain the most impact on the ability to transfer, will not immediately become custom.

Originality/value

Teachers, educational developers and stakeholders who are involved in developing the design, implementation and evaluation of their joint work‐related learning arrangements will find evidence based design guidelines and a framework to assess learning outcomes. The theoretical insights are based on a multidisciplinary combination of workplace learning theories, educational science and innovation management theory.

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Annmarie Nicely, Radesh Palakurthi and A. Denise Gooden

The goal of this study is to identify behaviors linked to hotel managers who report a high degree of work‐related learning. To achieve this the researchers seeks to…

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this study is to identify behaviors linked to hotel managers who report a high degree of work‐related learning. To achieve this the researchers seeks to determine whether the extent to which managers were intrinsically motivated to learn, their perceived risk‐taking abilities, their attitudes towards learning and their attitudes towards the hospitality industry could determine their level of individual work‐related learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted on the island of Jamaica. The survey was completed by 154 hotel managers and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Of the four behaviors examined, two predicted the hotel managers' individual work‐related learning levels, i.e. their perceived risk‐taking abilities, and their attitudes towards learning. Managers who reported high work‐related learning levels also reported high risk‐taking abilities and more positive attitudes towards learning. The extent to which they were intrinsically motivated to learn and their attitudes towards the hospitality industry were not significant determinants of their work‐related learning levels.

Research limitations/implications

The exercise had a number of limitations and these should be taken into consideration when reviewing the findings.

Practical implications

The study therefore pointed to two behaviors linked to intense individual learning amongst managers in hotels. Hotel managers wishing to display high levels of work‐related learning should therefore determine the extent to which they possess the behaviors connected and make the adjustments necessary.

Originality/value

The study was one of a small number which examined objectively individual learning in hospitality business.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Rachel Claire Douglas-Lenders, Peter Jeffrey Holland and Belinda Allen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of experiential simulation-based learning of employee self-efficacy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of experiential simulation-based learning of employee self-efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach is an exploratory case study of a group of trainees from the same organisation. Using a quasi-experiment, one group, pre-test-post-test design (Tharenou et al., 2007), a questionnaire with validated scales at Time 1 (T1) prior to training and Time (T2) three months after training were used. All scales had been validated by the researchers and had acceptable levels of reliability. In addition interviews are undertaken with the participants immediately at the end of the programme.

Findings

The research found strong evidence of the positive impact of the training on skills transfer to the workplace with support from supervisors as key criteria.

Research limitations/implications

There remains a need for additional studies with larger and more diverse samples and studies which incorporate control groups into their design.

Practical implications

This study provided support for the transfer of knowledge using simulation-based training and advances our limited knowledge and understanding of simulation-based training as a form of experiential (management) learning and development.

Originality/value

This is the first study to undertake a longitudinal analysis of the impact on self-efficacy in the workplace and as such adds to the research in this field.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 59 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2017

Maria Ferreira, Annemarie Künn-Nelen and Andries De Grip

This paper provides more insight into the assumption of human capital theory that the productivity of job-related training is driven by the improvement of workers’ skills…

Abstract

This paper provides more insight into the assumption of human capital theory that the productivity of job-related training is driven by the improvement of workers’ skills. We analyze the extent to which training and informal learning on the job are related to employee skill development and consider the heterogeneity of this relationship with respect to workers’ skill mismatch at job entry. Using data from the 2014 European Skills and Jobs Survey, we find – as assumed by human capital theory – that employees who participated in training or informal learning show greater improvement of their skills than those who did not. The contribution of informal learning to employee skill development appears to be larger than that of training participation. Nevertheless, both forms of learning are shown to be complementary. This complementarity between training and informal learning is related to a significant additional improvement of workers’ skills. The skill development of workers who were initially underskilled for their job seems to benefit the most from both training and informal learning, whereas the skill development of those who were initially overskilled benefits the least. Work-related learning investments in the latter group seem to be more functional in offsetting skill depreciation than in fostering skill accumulation.

Details

Skill Mismatch in Labor Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-377-7

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 October 2019

Lee Fergusson

Work-based research is the applied form of work-based learning (WBL) and has been described as the systematic and methodical process of investigating work-related

Abstract

Purpose

Work-based research is the applied form of work-based learning (WBL) and has been described as the systematic and methodical process of investigating work-related “problems”. Such problems can either be associated with specific workplaces and domains of practice or may more broadly be described as practical, social or real-world in nature. However, the specific characteristics of work-related problems for organisations and society have yet to be explained, and inadequate problem definition, multiple and competing goals, and lack of agreement on cause-effect relationships have hampered understanding. The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of work-related problems and provides examples from real-world contexts in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides models and examples of standard and non-standard work-related problems based on prior research and current practice.

Findings

Research paradigms view work-related problems as either definable and solvable or ill-defined, complex, difficult to describe and not easily rectified. The former view is concerned with “high ground problems” associated with traditional research methods; the latter with “lowland, messy, confusing problems” more frequently associated with the social sciences. Irrespective of orientation and definition, work-related problems have one thing in common: they are typically messy, constantly changing and complex, and many are co-produced and wicked.

Originality/value

Despite difficulties with identifying and isolating the various types of work-related problem, the paper establishes the importance of doing so for the practitioner. The definition and examination of work-related problems contribute to an evolving formulation of WBL and its application to private organisations, government agencies and work more generally.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Ray Dwerryhouse

It is considered that work related learning involves learning through work; learning about work; and learning for work. This paper examines the importance of work related

Abstract

It is considered that work related learning involves learning through work; learning about work; and learning for work. This paper examines the importance of work related learning for business students in the 16‐19 curriculum and how this can be integrated into an Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education (AVCE) business programme via the Young Enterprise (YE) scheme. It presents findings from a small research study, which indicates that YE can enhance learning about business within a realistic scenario. YE can be integrated into an AVCE programme in business and can effectively achieve a number of the aims of such programmes. It concludes that virtual reality work within the curriculum is possible. In this respect, such a model provides a challenge for the way vocational business courses are delivered.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2020

Nita Muir and Jenny Byrne

The purpose of this paper is to discuss empirical findings from a study that investigated the work practices within an education network, with the aim of understanding the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss empirical findings from a study that investigated the work practices within an education network, with the aim of understanding the processes of knowledge development and learning process.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is interpretatively positioned through a qualitative case study methodology. This enabled a holistic portrait of the network activity using three different methods of data collection. These were a preliminary focus group, followed by documentary analysis of a significant number of artefacts/documents produced by the network which were triangulated with data from interviews using a cross-case analytical framework.

Findings

Empirical insights are provided into the practice of the network through a lens of social capital. It suggests that having a strong bonding social capital is an informal learning factor which develops the individual participants “skills and knowledge” within the framework of Boyers scholarly practice. The findings also indicate a “dark side” to this informal learning factor which impeded collective learning through exclusivity and a maintenance of the status quo within the network.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen research approach, the research results may lack generalisability. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed propositions further.

Practical implications

The paper considers social capital within a network and the implication that this has on learning and development.

Originality/value

This paper provides insight into informal learning factors employed within work-related learning and the duality of social capital. It also offers a novel approach in understanding how nurse academics frame work-related learning through scholarly practice.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Tomasz Lemanski and Tina Overton

The purpose of this paper is to describe a new tool that can be used to help in the design and evaluation of work-based elements within programmes or to evaluate whole…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a new tool that can be used to help in the design and evaluation of work-based elements within programmes or to evaluate whole programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a case study approach to describe the development of the mapping tool. The tool is based on a matrix which enables users to map four variables: teacher-centred delivery, employer-centred delivery and students outcomes in terms of knowledge and skills.

Findings

The mapping tool provides a useful approach to evaluating the outcomes for work-based learning activities.

Practical implications

The mapping tool provides tutors with a useful, easily used way to visualise the nature of their work-based learning activities.

Originality/value

This paper presents a novel, practical and useful tool that has wide applicability in the field of work-based learning.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

David John Laughton

The purpose of this paper is to explore the aims, objectives and approach to change adopted by the e3i CETL for Employability at Sheffield Hallam University and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the aims, objectives and approach to change adopted by the e3i CETL for Employability at Sheffield Hallam University and illustrates the impact of change via three thematic case studies and an organising framework for understanding the locus of change with respect to work‐related learning: module curriculum and pedagogy (micro level), Faculty and Departmental strategies and operations, course design, structure and delivery (meso level), and institutional policies and processes (the macro level). These experiences are distilled to formulate recommendations for a modus operandi for those interested or involved with transforming higher education institutions (HEIs) to create a greater emphasis on and enhanced opportunities for students to engage with work‐related learning.

Design

A case studies approach is utilised to illustrate the work of the CETL in practice and generate insights.

Findings

Findings suggest that HEIs can successfully embrace the WRL agenda and make a significant contribution to achieving its aims and objectives. Central to this success is encouraging institutions to absorb WRL into their mission in an overt manner, providing guidance, support, encouragement, inspiration, resources and reward to colleagues involved in creating and facilitating WRL, and adopting a modus operandi with regards to change that resonates with institutional academic culture.

Practical implications

The paper suggests an approach to strategic and transformative change in HEIs that will be of interest to change agents across the sector.

Originality/value

The paper adds insights to the expanding literature on managing large‐scale change initiatives in HEIs.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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