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Article

Maryam Dilmaghani

The purpose of this paper is to, using several cycles of the Canadian General Social Survey (GSS) covering 2010–2015, examine the patterns of work-life balance (WLB…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to, using several cycles of the Canadian General Social Survey (GSS) covering 2010–2015, examine the patterns of work-life balance (WLB) satisfaction and work-life segmentation by sexual orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, multivariate regression analysis is used.

Findings

The analysis shows that men living with a male partner are more satisfied with their WLB than their heterosexual counterparts. No statistically significant difference is found between women who live with a female partner and their heterosexual counterparts, in WLB satisfaction. Work-life segmentation is operationalized by the odds of being at the top levels of the life satisfaction scale without being satisfied with the circumstances of one’s job. Controlling for a wide range of characteristics, working Canadians living with a same-sex partner, regardless of their genders, are found more likely to have segmented their work and life domains than their heterosexual counterparts.

Originality/value

The paper, for the first time, investigates how sexual orientation relates to WLB satisfaction and work-life segmentation. This study exploits a unique opportunity offered by the Canadian GSSs in which WLB satisfaction is directly surveyed, all the while partnered sexual minorities are identifiable.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article

Yinyin Cao, Frits K. Pil and Benn Lawson

This study aims to provide insight on how work–life initiatives impact employees. Using corporate volunteer programs as an example, the authors examine the role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide insight on how work–life initiatives impact employees. Using corporate volunteer programs as an example, the authors examine the role of coworker social influence in shaping the reactions of both employee participants and non-participants of the program. The paper further identifies several factors that may moderate these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors surveyed employees before and after the implementation of a new corporate work–life initiative. 99 employees provided data pre and post. OLS regression and hierarchical linear modeling were used to test hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Even in the context of low participation, work–life initiatives engendered positive organization-related perceptions among employees. These positive outcomes were due in part to coworkers' sharing of their volunteer experiences and were most prominent for employees in positions that afforded flexibility, and employees who reported close ties with coworkers.

Practical implications

The study deepens our understanding of employee reactions to work–life programs and underlines the importance of these programs even when employee participation is low. The role of coworker influence as a determinant of employee reactions suggests there may be value in purposefully fostering participants' sharing of volunteer experiences in the workplace.

Originality/value

This study takes a unique approach to examining the role of coworker influence in shaping employee reactions to corporate initiatives.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article

T. Alexandra Beauregard, Maria Adamson, Aylin Kunter, Lilian Miles and Ian Roper

This article serves as an introduction to six articles featured in a special issue on diversity in the work–life interface. This collection of papers contains research…

Abstract

Purpose

This article serves as an introduction to six articles featured in a special issue on diversity in the work–life interface. This collection of papers contains research that contemplates the work–life interface in different geographic and cultural contexts, that explores the work–life experiences of minority, marginalized and/or underresearched groups of workers and that takes into account diverse arrangements made to fulfill both work and nonwork responsibilities.

Design/methodology/approach

This introductory article first summarizes some of the emerging research in this area, introduces the papers in this special issue and links them to these themes and ends with highlighting the importance of using an intersectional lens in future investigations of the work–life interface.

Findings

These six articles provide empirically based insights, as well as new theoretical considerations for studying the interface between paid work and personal life roles. Compelling new research directions are identified.

Originality/value

Introducing the new articles in this special issue and reviewing recent research in this area brings together the work–life interface scholarship and diversity management studies and points to the necessity for future investigations to take an intersectional and contextualized approach to their subject matter.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article

Gail Kinman and Fiona Jones

Although the effort‐reward imbalance (ERI) model of job stress has gained support in predicting employee health, it has rarely been examined in the context of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the effort‐reward imbalance (ERI) model of job stress has gained support in predicting employee health, it has rarely been examined in the context of the work‐home interface. This study aims to test an expanded ERI model in predicting work‐life conflict (WLC) in university employees. Three hypotheses relating to the ERI are tested. It is also predicted that lower organisational support for work‐life balance, less schedule flexibility and lower levels of separation between work and home life will lead to increased work‐life conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

In this cross‐sectional study, 1,108 employees working in UK universities completed questionnaires assessing ERI, WLC, schedule flexibility, employer support and work‐life separation/integration.

Findings

Strong main effects of job‐related efforts, rewards and over‐commitment on WLC are found. A significant two‐way interaction (effort×reward) and some evidence for a three‐way interaction effort×reward×over‐commitment) are observed. Perceived schedule flexibility and work‐life integration also make significant contributions to the variance in WLC. The final model explains 66 per cent of criterion variance.

Research limitations/implications

As the study is cross‐sectional, causal relationships cannot be established.

Practical implications

This study extends knowledge of the ERI model as a predictor of WLC. More research is required into ways in which effort‐reward inequity and over‐commitment might threaten work‐life balance, together with the working practices and organisational factors which might modify this threat.

Originality/value

The ERI model has rarely been examined in the context of the work‐home interface. The importance of effort‐reward imbalance and over‐commitment to WLC has been highlighted.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article

Rachel Worthington

This paper aims to describe research which was undertaken exploring organisational climate within a prison setting and the potential directional affects of work and home…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe research which was undertaken exploring organisational climate within a prison setting and the potential directional affects of work and home. The purpose of the research was to develop a conceptual framework of the impact of climate on social and emotional functioning.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the competing values framework 149 prison staff completed a questionnaire designed to explore the interactional effects of boundary theory, organisational climate and well being.

Findings

It was found that all staff placed emphasis on the control quadrant of the organisational climate. In addition, the data revealed a moderately curvilinear relationship between length of service and climate engagement on each of the quadrants. These results parallel other research in relation to attitude change. The desire for higher integration was associated with an increased impact on work/home life and a desire for, and achievement of, segmentation does not directly impact on subjective well being. The research concluded that viewing integration and segmentation along a continuum in relation to the prison service role is too simplistic. Rather, these should be viewed in a more complex way and a model for this is proposed. The findings also indicate that employees with high identity consistency (integration) also had a more engaged experience of the prison climate whereas employees with lower identity consistency (segmentation) were less engaged.

Research limitations/implications

There are several implications of the research. Firstly, further research is required to explore the potential impact of attempting to change a prison climate in terms of understanding why certain climate quadrants may be preferred by staff in different roles. The findings indicate that where certain quadrant preferences occur these may be functional to prison safety and alteration of these should be considered carefully. The research also indicated that current theories of boundary management may have some applicability but that within a prison setting these are complex and influenced by both internal organizational factors and those within the wider community. Further research into the concept of “dirty work” and the impact this may have on climate would be of benefit.

Originality/value

This is the first research to explore the role of organizational climate within a prison setting and to consider factors which are specific to a prison environment which may influence the organizational climate. This paper is of value to those who are interested in prison settings and how the environment can influence employee experiences of working in a prison and how identity consistence can influence experiences of work.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

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Article

Christin Mellner

Modern working life is characterized by increased expectations for employees to be available to deal with work issues outside regular work hours and by using new…

Abstract

Purpose

Modern working life is characterized by increased expectations for employees to be available to deal with work issues outside regular work hours and by using new communication technology. This implies more individual freedom in organizing work in time and space, but also places increased demands on employees to manage the boundaries between work and personal life. This, in turn, can be expected to be crucial to their ability to mentally detach from work during free time. The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether individual perceptions of boundary control moderate the impact of after-hours availability expectations and work-related smartphone use during off-work hours on psychological detachment.

Design/methodology/approach

The study population comprised 2,876 gainfully employed professionals from four large organizations in both the public and private sector, representing various businesses and occupations. Univariate correlations and multiple, linear hierarchical multiple regression analyses were performed.

Findings

High after-hours availability expectations, high frequency of work-related smartphone use, and low boundary control were associated with poor psychological detachment. Furthermore, boundary control moderated the relationships between both after-hours availability expectations and work-related smartphone use, respectively, and psychological detachment. As such, boundary control mitigated the negative effects of both after-hours availability expectations and work-related smartphone use during leisure on psychological detachment.

Practical implications

Modern work organizations would benefit from introducing availability policies and helping employees reduce their work-related smartphone use outside regular work hours, thus helping them achieve successful boundary control and subsequent psychological detachment.

Originality/value

In a working life characterized by blurred boundaries, employees’ ability to achieve boundary control can be regarded as crucial.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article

Luísa Helena Pinto and Helena Salgueirinho Maia

The purpose of this paper is to examine the narratives of the work-life interface (WLI) of Portuguese international business travelers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the narratives of the work-life interface (WLI) of Portuguese international business travelers.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews with 14 Portuguese international business travelers were conducted to expose the narratives of the WLI in terms of demands, resources, and coping and how these work-life events shape work-identity.

Findings

The findings show that: work-life events are interconnected and are sources of conflict and enrichment; work-life boundaries are personally managed and socially enacted; and WLI shapes work-identity. The analysis shows that occupational travel can be both a source of positive self-regard and fulfillment that entails high work-identity and low boundary control or a source of conflict and identity threat. In either case, work-life coping is devised to prompt self-worth.

Originality/value

Following the findings from this exploratory study, several research propositions are outlined for international business travelers, highlighting the interactions between work-life centrality, work-life boundary management and work-identity. In extending the work-life research to international business travelers this study reveals the extent to which the advancement of work-life research benefits from the theoretical and empirical contributions of the literature on work-identity.

Propósito/objetivo

Este estudo exploratório examina as narrativas dos viajantes de negócios internacionais quanto ao interface trabalho-vida pessoal.

Metodologia

Foram efetuadas catorze entrevistas semiestruturadas a viajantes de negócios internacionais portugueses com o objetivo de expor as suas narrativas de interface trabalho-vida pessoal, em termos de exigências, recursos e estratégias para lidarem com estes eventos. Adicionalmente examinou-se como os eventos relacionados com o trabalho e vida pessoal moldam a identidade profissional destes viajantes frequentes.

Resultados

Os resultados demonstram que: (1) os eventos relacionados com o trabalho e a vida pessoal estão interrelacionados e são fonte de conflito e enriquecimento; (2) as fronteiras entre o trabalho e a vida pessoal são geridas individualmente mas são ditadas socialmente; e (3) o interface trabalho-vida pessoal molda a identidade no trabalho destes viajantes internacionais. A análise revela que as viagens de trabalho frequentes podem ser fonte de autoestima e satisfação, associada a uma forte identidade profissional, assim como podem ser fonte de conflito e de ameaça a essa mesma identidade. Em qualquer dos casos, os indivíduos inquiridos acionaram estratégias para lidarem com os eventos de ambos os domínios que visam elevar a sua autoestima e identidade.

Originalidade/valor

Os resultados deste estudo permitem avançar várias proposições para investigação futura, salientando as interações entre a centralidade do trabalho e/ou da vida pessoal, a gestão das fronteiras entre estes domínios e a construção da identidade. Ao estudar o interface entre o trabalho e a vida pessoal dos viajantes frequentes, este estudo contribui para o avanço da investigação neste domínio ao revelar os benefícios de explorar as contribuições teóricas e práticas da literatura sobre a identidade associada ao trabalho.

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Article

Jane Yarnall

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential implications of selecting and developing discrete pools of talent within organizations and to answer the question “If…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential implications of selecting and developing discrete pools of talent within organizations and to answer the question “If talent is singled out as a separate group of high‐potential individuals in organizations, what measures could be put in place to help ensure their effectiveness?”

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the literature on talent pools and examines existing case study research, drawing on an analysis of over 50 companies. This analysis was used to draw out aspects which impact the effectiveness of talent pools at particular points in time; from the initial establishment of pool members through to the ongoing maintenance of an established talent pool.

Findings

Findings indicate that during the establishment phase, ensuring appropriate segmentation of the pool and limiting bias in the nomination process were particularly significant. The ongoing maintenance of a successful talent pool was also found to be a challenge from both an organizational and an individual perspective. Specific factors that were identified were dealing with changing business needs; changing individual circumstances; providing development opportunities; maintaining senior commitment; and defining success measures.

Practical implications

The research identifies a number of critical factors that practitioners may need to address in the process of establishing and maintaining talent pools, such as pool segmentation, work‐life balance and the impact on the psychological contract.

Originality/value

The ongoing maintenance of talent pools is rarely discussed in the literature and the recommendations for practice will be relevant for all human resource and organizational development practitioners.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article

Ann Marie Ryan and Caitlin Q. Briggs

Work-life research has been critiqued for focusing on the experiences of middle and upper class, younger, White, western and heterosexual women. The purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Work-life research has been critiqued for focusing on the experiences of middle and upper class, younger, White, western and heterosexual women. The purpose of this paper is to provide a critical lens to conceptualizations that take an intersectionality approach, or at least consider multiple identities, in examining work-life conflict and balance.

Design/methodology/approach

A brief review of the current status of intersectionality research within the work-life realm is provided before discussing the implications of primarily using a single-identity approach to work-life issues. The advantages and challenges of adopting a multiple identity approach are discussed.

Findings

This paper highlights the problems of a lack of an intersectional focus in terms of unidentified needs, ignored values, unresolved conflicts and unhelpful advice. Tensions inherent in trying to adopt an intersectional perspective when dealing with practice and policy issues, particularly with regard to visibility and authenticity, are noted. The paper concludes with a discussion of how considerations of identity and power in work-family research connect to the broader concept of inclusion in the workplace, noting the possible challenges of stereotyping and ambiguity in doing so.

Originality/value

Applying an intersectionality lens to efforts to promote work-life balance in organizations can increase inclusivity, but there are tensions and pitfalls associated with this that are particularly of note for practitioners and policy. A research agenda is outlined as a starting point for addressing these issues.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article

Severin Hornung and Jürgen Glaser

Investigating employee responses to relational fulfilment of the psychological contract and work‐life benefits of a telecommuting program, this study aims to contribute to…

Abstract

Purpose

Investigating employee responses to relational fulfilment of the psychological contract and work‐life benefits of a telecommuting program, this study aims to contribute to the literature on social exchange in employment.

Design/methodology/approach

The setting of the study was the German public administration. Survey data from 947 Civil Servants were analyzed in structural equation models. Analysis of mean structure was used to compare telecommuting participants (n=601) and regular workers (n=346).

Findings

Trust and affective commitment consecutively mediated between relational fulfilment of the psychological contract and organizational citizenship behavior. Members of the telecommuting program had more positive representations of social exchange, reporting higher levels of fulfilment, trust, and commitment than their peers.

Research limitations/implications

Reliance on cross‐sectional self‐report data poses a limitation. Selection effects in the quasi‐experimental design for comparing telecommuters and regular employees cannot be ruled out. Generalizability to more transactional or short‐term employment is debatable.

Originality/value

The study adds to a more integrated understanding of the psychological processes that reinforce and strengthen employee trust and commitment, thus forming the basis of the motivation to go above and beyond specified duties and reward‐contingent behavior.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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