Search results

1 – 10 of over 154000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Josephine H. Lappia

The purpose of the study is to produce design guidelines based on insights from both practice and theory that will enable teachers and educational developers to execute…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to produce design guidelines based on insights from both practice and theory that will enable teachers and educational developers to execute the design, implementation and evaluation of their workrelated learning arrangements with stakeholders involved.

Design/methodology/approach

The first study reported in this paper can be characterised as an exploratory design study. The second and third study can be described as design‐oriented research.

Findings

The case studies showed that to realize work related learning arrangements mutual understanding between stakeholders is needed to decide what has to be learned by the students and to create learning situations that have a high similarity with real working situations.

Research limitations/implications

The ultimate evaluation question whether students indeed show high levels of learning outcomes on the levels of the framework when they followed workrelated learning arrangements that are arranged according to the design guidelines, fall out of the scope of this paper.

Practical implications

Factors that influence the intended and implemented design of work related arrangements are derived from practical and theoretical insights. Design guidelines to influence these factors in a positive direction are formulated, based on these insights. For the expected learning outcomes a dynamic framework is developed.

Social implications

Work related learning arrangements are still rare in higher education and practical experience is generally only gained during short periods of internships. So the finding that learning by experience and social interaction and learning by theory and reflection should be combined in joint work related learning arrangements to obtain the most impact on the ability to transfer, will not immediately become custom.

Originality/value

Teachers, educational developers and stakeholders who are involved in developing the design, implementation and evaluation of their joint workrelated learning arrangements will find evidence based design guidelines and a framework to assess learning outcomes. The theoretical insights are based on a multidisciplinary combination of workplace learning theories, educational science and innovation management theory.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

David Gijbels, Isabel Raemdonck, Dries Vervecken and Jonas Van Herck

A central issue in the field of workplace learning is how workrelated learning can be stimulated so that a powerful learning work environment is created. This paper seeks…

Downloads
1992

Abstract

Purpose

A central issue in the field of workplace learning is how workrelated learning can be stimulated so that a powerful learning work environment is created. This paper seeks to further enlarge understanding on this issue. Based on the demand‐control‐support the aim is to investigate the influence of job‐characteristics on the workrelated learning behaviour of the worker such as job demands, job control, social support at work on the one hand and self‐directed learning orientation on the other.

Design/methodology/approach

The study took place in the ICT‐department of a large company in Flanders. By means of an online questionnaire, all employees of the ICT‐department were asked to complete this questionnaire, which, apart from general information on the participants (age, gender, prior education, etc.), consisted of statements on five scales (job demands, job control, social support, self‐directed learning orientation, and workrelated learning behaviour) adapted from validated instruments. There was a total of 73 participants (response rate of 52 per cent, 73 per cent men, 27 per cent women, age varying from 20‐51 years old). In addition, all scales had Cronbach's alpha values above 0.79. Relations between the variables under study were tested using the Pearson correlation. The predictive value of the variables for the variance in workrelated learning was tested using the enter method of a multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The regression analyses show that job demands and job control were moderately positive and significantly linked with workrelated learning behaviour. Social support did not show a significant positive correlation with workrelated learning at all. Self‐directed learning orientation on the contrary had a strong and positive relation with workrelated learning. The results of the linear regression analyses indicated that only the self‐directed learning orientation scale significantly predicted the workrelated learning behaviour.

Originality/value

The study is one of the few investigations that takes into account both the role of personal and workplace‐related variables in order to better understand workrelated learning. The results stress that personal related variables such as self‐regulated learning orientation need to be taken into account in further research and in the daily practice of human resources development.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2017

Maria Ferreira, Annemarie Künn-Nelen and Andries De Grip

This paper provides more insight into the assumption of human capital theory that the productivity of job-related training is driven by the improvement of workers’ skills…

Abstract

This paper provides more insight into the assumption of human capital theory that the productivity of job-related training is driven by the improvement of workers’ skills. We analyze the extent to which training and informal learning on the job are related to employee skill development and consider the heterogeneity of this relationship with respect to workers’ skill mismatch at job entry. Using data from the 2014 European Skills and Jobs Survey, we find – as assumed by human capital theory – that employees who participated in training or informal learning show greater improvement of their skills than those who did not. The contribution of informal learning to employee skill development appears to be larger than that of training participation. Nevertheless, both forms of learning are shown to be complementary. This complementarity between training and informal learning is related to a significant additional improvement of workers’ skills. The skill development of workers who were initially underskilled for their job seems to benefit the most from both training and informal learning, whereas the skill development of those who were initially overskilled benefits the least. Work-related learning investments in the latter group seem to be more functional in offsetting skill depreciation than in fostering skill accumulation.

Details

Skill Mismatch in Labor Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-377-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Annmarie Nicely, Radesh Palakurthi and A. Denise Gooden

The goal of this study is to identify behaviors linked to hotel managers who report a high degree of workrelated learning. To achieve this the researchers seeks to…

Downloads
1588

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this study is to identify behaviors linked to hotel managers who report a high degree of workrelated learning. To achieve this the researchers seeks to determine whether the extent to which managers were intrinsically motivated to learn, their perceived risk‐taking abilities, their attitudes towards learning and their attitudes towards the hospitality industry could determine their level of individual workrelated learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted on the island of Jamaica. The survey was completed by 154 hotel managers and multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Of the four behaviors examined, two predicted the hotel managers' individual workrelated learning levels, i.e. their perceived risk‐taking abilities, and their attitudes towards learning. Managers who reported high workrelated learning levels also reported high risk‐taking abilities and more positive attitudes towards learning. The extent to which they were intrinsically motivated to learn and their attitudes towards the hospitality industry were not significant determinants of their workrelated learning levels.

Research limitations/implications

The exercise had a number of limitations and these should be taken into consideration when reviewing the findings.

Practical implications

The study therefore pointed to two behaviors linked to intense individual learning amongst managers in hotels. Hotel managers wishing to display high levels of workrelated learning should therefore determine the extent to which they possess the behaviors connected and make the adjustments necessary.

Originality/value

The study was one of a small number which examined objectively individual learning in hospitality business.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 January 2009

Kaija Collin

The aim of this study is to investigate how workers' workrelated identity is related to various forms of workplace learning. The study also aims to show how changes in…

Downloads
2736

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to investigate how workers' workrelated identity is related to various forms of workplace learning. The study also aims to show how changes in the organization affect both learning and the workrelated identity construction of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth interviews with four design engineers were conducted in 2000 and 2007 in Finland. Narrative analysis was used to construct four stories that were compared at two different points in time to find out what changes and development took place in relation to experiences of learning and workrelated identity.

Findings

The findings suggest that learning and workrelated identity are related to one another in many ways. Usually this relationship is individually constituted, but many of its elements are socially shared. Workrelated identity is constructed strategically as one of many identities constituted in the other areas of life.

Practical implications

The findings of this study show that employers should bear in mind the importance of this interrelationship in order to promote employees' commitment and so facilitate their continuous learning and construction of their workrelated identity.

Originality/value

This paper provides useful information on how changes in the organization affect both learning and the workrelated identity construction of employees.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 January 2007

David Livingstone and Susan Stowe

The purpose of this paper is to examine the paid and unpaid work time and learning activities of a small longitudinal sample (n=286) of continuously employed Canadians…

Downloads
1225

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the paid and unpaid work time and learning activities of a small longitudinal sample (n=286) of continuously employed Canadians over the 1998‐2004 period.

Design/methodology/approach

A sub‐sample of those who responded to two national surveys carried out in 1998 and 2004 and who were continuously employed throughout this period was selected. In addition to a quantitative analysis of their responses to both surveys, a qualitative analysis of open‐ended interviews in 2000 with many of the same respondents offers further insight into orientations to engagement in formal (course‐based) and informal learning.

Findings

Those who are not taking adult education courses are still very likely to participate continually in job‐related informal learning. There is some indication that continuing lack of participation in courses may be associated with declining participation in job‐related informal learning. The in‐depth interviews suggest that most continuously employed respondents see course‐based education and informal learning as complementary.

Originality/value

The lack of prior longitudinal population studies means that understanding of continuity and change in work and learning relations has been based on inferences from cross‐sectional surveys. There are few recent longitudinal surveys of work and learning and none that incorporate both unpaid work and informal learning as well as paid work and adult education course participation. This study provides some elementary benchmarks for further diachronic research on work time and learning relations.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

David W. Livingstone

Explores relations between workers’ extent of control over their paid and unpaid labour processes and the incidence of different types of organized and informal learning

Downloads
1026

Abstract

Explores relations between workers’ extent of control over their paid and unpaid labour processes and the incidence of different types of organized and informal learning. Activity theory is used to posit relations between power and knowledge acquisition in different spheres of work. The sources of evidence are recent Canadian national surveys. Implications of the findings for more democratic organization of paid workplaces and educational institutions are briefly noted.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 13 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Rachel Claire Douglas-Lenders, Peter Jeffrey Holland and Belinda Allen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of experiential simulation-based learning of employee self-efficacy.

Downloads
3150

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of experiential simulation-based learning of employee self-efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach is an exploratory case study of a group of trainees from the same organisation. Using a quasi-experiment, one group, pre-test-post-test design (Tharenou et al., 2007), a questionnaire with validated scales at Time 1 (T1) prior to training and Time (T2) three months after training were used. All scales had been validated by the researchers and had acceptable levels of reliability. In addition interviews are undertaken with the participants immediately at the end of the programme.

Findings

The research found strong evidence of the positive impact of the training on skills transfer to the workplace with support from supervisors as key criteria.

Research limitations/implications

There remains a need for additional studies with larger and more diverse samples and studies which incorporate control groups into their design.

Practical implications

This study provided support for the transfer of knowledge using simulation-based training and advances our limited knowledge and understanding of simulation-based training as a form of experiential (management) learning and development.

Originality/value

This is the first study to undertake a longitudinal analysis of the impact on self-efficacy in the workplace and as such adds to the research in this field.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 59 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Ana-Inés Renta-Davids, José-Miguel Jiménez-González, Manel Fandos-Garrido and Ángel-Pío González-Soto

This paper aims to analyse transfer of learning to workplace regarding to job-related training courses. Training courses analysed in this study are offered under the…

Downloads
4611

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse transfer of learning to workplace regarding to job-related training courses. Training courses analysed in this study are offered under the professional training for employment framework in Spain.

Design/methodology/approach

During the training courses, trainees completed a self-reported survey of reasons for participation (time 1 data collection, N = 447). Two months after training, a second survey was sent to the trainees by email (time 2 data collection, N = 158). Factor analysis, correlations and multiple hierarchical regressions were performed.

Findings

The results of this study demonstrate the importance of training relevance and training effectiveness in transfer of training. Results indicated that relevance, the extent training courses were related to participant’s workplace activities and professional development, positively influences transfer of training. Effectiveness, training features which facilitated participants to acquire knowledge and skills, also has a significantly positive influence in transfer of training. Motivation to participate and learning-conducive workplace features also have a positive influence in transfer of training.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the understanding of transfer of learning in work-related training programmes by analysing the factors that influence transfer of learning back to the workplace. The study has practical implication for training designers and education providers to enhance work-related training in the context of the Professional Training for Employment Subsystem in Spain.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Yu-Yin Wang, Tung-Ching Lin and Crystal Han-Huei Tsay

Though prior research has recognized business skills as one of the keys to successful information system development, few studies have investigated the determinants of an…

Downloads
2218

Abstract

Purpose

Though prior research has recognized business skills as one of the keys to successful information system development, few studies have investigated the determinants of an IS developer’s behavioral intention to learn such skills. Based on the motivation-ability-role perception-situational factors (i.e. the MARS model), the purpose of this paper is to argue that the intention of IS developers to acquire business skills is influenced by learning motivation (M), learning self-efficacy (A), change agent role perception (R), and situational support (S).

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 254 IS developers are analyzed using the partial least squares technique.

Findings

Results show that a developer’s intention to learn business skills is positively influenced by intrinsic learning motivation and both absolute and relative learning self-efficacy. Furthermore, in comparison to two other change agent roles, the advocate role leads to a significantly higher level of learning intention. Finally, work and non-work support positively influence both extrinsic and intrinsic learning motivation. Notably, non-work support has a greater impact on both absolute and relative learning self-efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

Though many of the proposed hypotheses were supported, results showed several interesting and unexpected findings. First, regarding the change agent role perception, people who perceived themselves as advocates displayed a higher level of intention to learn business skills than did those who identified with the other two roles (i.e. traditionalist and facilitator). Second, when compared to extrinsic learning motivation, intrinsic learning motivation contributed more to the intention to learn business skills. Third, the study contributes to the literature by finding that, in terms of direction and magnitude, the two types of self-efficacy have similar influence on an IS developer’s behavioral intention to learn business skills. Finally, work support was found to have a positive impact on both extrinsic and intrinsic learning motivation. However, it was interesting to note that work support did not lead to significantly higher levels of relative and absolute learning self-efficacy.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide several critical implications for practitioners seeking to encourage IS developers to learn b-skills. First, organizations should strongly encourage IS developers to take on the advocate role in ISD projects, and urge them to acquire business skills through formal education and on-the-job training. Second, organizations should also help IS developers understand how learning business skills is important for their future work and potential self-growth, rather than focusing solely on extrinsic benefits such as promotion or remuneration. Third, organizations can also make use of the strategies to enhance IS developer’s learning self-confidence and beliefs, which will, in turn, increase their intention to learn business skills. Finally, support from others is influential in the formulation of positive work attitudes and behaviors, so organizations will benefit when employees are well supported.

Originality/value

While prior research has emphasized the importance of business skill possession for IS developers during the system development process, few studies have explored the factors affecting an IS developer’s behavioral intention to learn those business skills. This study intends to bridge this gap by investigating factors that drive IS developers’ intention to learn business skills. The findings of this study are useful to researchers in the development and testing theories related to IS developer learning behavior, and to practitioners to facilitate business skill learning for their IS development staff.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 154000