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Article

Fiona McFadzean and Elspeth McFadzean

To examine the literature on employee morale and to construct a model of this area pertaining to nurses. This framework seeks to present morale in a holistic manner…

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the literature on employee morale and to construct a model of this area pertaining to nurses. This framework seeks to present morale in a holistic manner, illustrating the causal factors that influence nursing morale, the changes that occur in morale when these input variables are altered, and the consequences to patient care and individual and group nursing practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A number of published works on morale, its causal factors and resulting consequences are critiqued. The findings from this literature review are used to develop a framework for nursing morale.

Findings

The paper presents a definition of morale and, from the literature review, concludes that previous models on morale are fragmented; only tending to explore the variables that influence the employees' emotional state. Consequently, a framework of nursing morale is constructed in order to illustrate this topic from a holistic point‐of‐view.

Practical implications

The paper concludes with a number of management and research implications. The management implications consist of a number of useful suggestions for senior nurses to enhance the morale within their units.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified gap in the literature, namely the lack of a holistic model of nursing morale, and offers practical help to senior nurses so that they can initiate processes within their wards that can improve their subordinates' morale.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 19 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Content available
Article

Laxmiprada Pattnaik and Lalatendu Kesari Jena

The purpose of this paper is to explore the inter-linkages of mindfulness, remote engagement and employee morale as a solution to new normal, during the turbulent times of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the inter-linkages of mindfulness, remote engagement and employee morale as a solution to new normal, during the turbulent times of the pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Remote engagement is the biggest challenge that is faced by many organisations with their employees working remotely. This paper examines the relevance of mindfulness amidst all distractions that obstruct the employees to stay focussed in their work assignments while performing remotely. Therefore, a thorough literature survey has been made to analyse the conceptual relationship among mindfulness, remote engagement and employee morale. Based on the conceptual analysis, a set of possible frameworks linking the three constructs has been stated for future research.

Findings

This conceptual paper has come up with few possible frameworks to model the assertions by investigating and corroborating it with quantitative or qualitative studies by the future researchers.

Research limitations/implications

This paper has tried to advocate the linkage of the three constructs, which is the need of the hour for setting the organisation to the new normal way of work.

Practical implications

The current paper suggests that the organisations can deal with the toughest challenge of engaging people remotely by practising mindfulness technique, and thereby, it would result in high morale leading to improved performance. This approach paves the way for leading a “new normal” even post-pandemic.

Originality/value

Due to the prevalence of the unforeseen situation of pandemic, organisations have no other way but to resort to remote work. Through the practice of mindfulness, the engagement of employees can be adhered to an extent, which results in enhanced employee morale, which can help the organisation to achieve its business objectives amidst this turbulent time and gradually resorts to function in the new normal.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article

Susan J. Linz, Linda K. Good and Patricia Huddleston

Despite unanimous agreement in the existing literature that morale influences employee performance, no well‐defined measure of morale exists. In Russia, identifying the…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite unanimous agreement in the existing literature that morale influences employee performance, no well‐defined measure of morale exists. In Russia, identifying the factors that contribute to employee morale is particularly important since firms face difficult financial challenges imposed by the decade‐long economic and political transition that began in January 1992. The study aims to develop a robust measure of morale and focuses on the factors that influence morale among Russian workers.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from Russian employees at two different points in time, 1995 and 2002, in five Russian cities (Moscow, St. Petersburg, Taganrog, Rostov and Azov). The study used regression analysis to assess the influence of expected rewards on employee morale.

Findings

The paper finds that among the workers participating in the study, expectation of receiving a desired reward contributes to high morale, with expected monetary rewards having a higher influence that expected non‐monetary rewards, but praise for a job well done and a feeling of accomplishment also contribute positively to employee morale. There is a significant correlation between positive attitudes toward work and morale, and a positive correlation between performance assessment and morale. Demographic characteristics (age and gender) have no discernable influence on morale when controls are included for work experience.

Research limitations/implications

Data are cross‐sectional rather than longitudinal and sampling is purposive rather than random.

Practical implications

The research suggests that if companies are not financially able to provide monetary rewards, managers can focus on developing a work environment that is friendly and fosters mutual respect. Managers have control over praise and it costs nothing to praise employees for a “job well done.”

Originality/value

No study to date has examined Russian worker morale nor tested morale measures developed in developed market economies on Russian workers. The study develops three reliable measures of morale.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article

Ruth Simpson, Debbie Holley and Adrian Woods

This paper examines the impact of restructuring within the transport and logistics sector on women managers working at senior and less senior (middle/junior management…

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of restructuring within the transport and logistics sector on women managers working at senior and less senior (middle/junior management) levels of the organization. The majority of women experienced increased performance pressures and heavier workloads as well as an increase in working hours. At the same time, there were pressures to work at home (i.e. weekends and evenings) and reduced opportunities to work from home (i.e. during normal office hours). Management level emerged as an important factor in how these changes were interpreted. Senior managers perceived more positive outcomes in terms of increased motivation and loyalty. Despite a longer working week, they were less likely to report low morale as an outcome from long hours. In fact, irrespective of management level, women working shorter hours were more likely to report low morale as an outcome. Results are discussed in relation to literature on restructuring and careers, in terms of perceptual framing and in relation to different levels of investment in the organization.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article

Robert Sommer and Sally Augustin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of worker orientation in their cubicles on workplace behavior and experience.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of worker orientation in their cubicles on workplace behavior and experience.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via written surveys, oral interviews, and workspace observations.

Findings

Based on computer location, cubicle occupants in a large corporate office were classified as facing out or facing into the corner of their cubicle. People faced out to enhance communication, to protect the confidentiality of material they were working with, and to avoid being startled. Those facing in did so to reduce distractions and/or physical constraints. The chief disadvantages of facing in were loss of confidentiality and the possibility of being startled by people approaching from the rear. Cubicle occupants whose computers faced out, relative to those facing in, maintained that their spatial orientation had a positive effect on communication and morale within the work unit. Respondents used nonverbal signals to modulate interaction with others, employing seating locations and body positions to reduce likelihood of interruption and used different signals to indicate receptivity to interaction.

Practical implications

A workspace should have the flexibility to meet a wide range of functional and individual requirements.

Originality/value

Workspace orientation has not previously been investigated in this way and important insights were obtained through this study.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article

Karin Newman, Uvanney Maylor and Bal Chansarkar

This paper proposes an integrated approach to examining and dealing with the complex issue of nurse recruitment, retention, healthcare quality and patient satisfaction…

Abstract

This paper proposes an integrated approach to examining and dealing with the complex issue of nurse recruitment, retention, healthcare quality and patient satisfaction. The paper depicts and describes a generic conceptual framework or chain derived from a review of the literature on nurse recruitment and retention, service quality and human resource management. The chain is made up of the following components: NHS and Trust conditions and environment (internal quality) –service capability – nurse satisfaction –nurse retention – quality of patient care – patient satisfaction. The value of the chain is derived from its synthesis and display of the prime constituents or drivers of nurse satisfaction, quality of patient care and satisfaction. From this holistic picture it is possible for both national and local initiatives to be integrated in a mutually reinforcing way in order to achieve improvements in nurse recruitment, retention, quality of care and patient satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article

Andrew Korac‐Kakabadse, Nada Korac‐Kakabadse and Andrew Myers

Leadership philosophy is explored through gender and other demographic characteristics in the Australian Public Service (APS), at the federal government level. Leadership…

Abstract

Leadership philosophy is explored through gender and other demographic characteristics in the Australian Public Service (APS), at the federal government level. Leadership philosophy is conceptualised as the leader’s attitudes, values and behaviour. Gender differences in characteristics of leaders (executives and middle managers) are examined in terms of strategic behaviour, management style, work‐related values, adoption of information technology, perceived organisational morale, family/work conflict and personal, work and family satisfaction. The gender differences are investigated using questionnaire responses from a sample of 750 respondents, of which 569 were male and 145 female. The APS findings are compared with a Cranfield study conducted in the UK’s National Health Service (NHS), where gender differences are explored in terms of management and strategic orientation. A sample of 515 chief executives, medical, clinical, HR and financial directors, chairpersons and other non‐executive directors, consists of 406 male and 108 female respondents. The APS study reveals that there are no significant gender differences in the majority of measured characteristics. Similarly in the NHS Trusts study, no significant gender differences are found in terms of management and strategic orientation. The conclusion reached is that other demographic characteristics are influential in forming leadership philosophies, namely job and organisational tenure and experience of senior management responsibilities, thus highlighting the importance of organisational demographics and their impact on leadership attitudes and practice.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article

Luo Lu, Cary L. Cooper, Shu‐Fang Kao and Yun Zhou

Towards the end of the twentieth century, the world has witnessed an amazing economic take‐off in the East Asia, especially within the territory of so‐called “Greater…

Abstract

Towards the end of the twentieth century, the world has witnessed an amazing economic take‐off in the East Asia, especially within the territory of so‐called “Greater China”, encompassing the PRC and Taiwan. Against this economic and cultural background, this study surveyed 258 and 189 employees respectively in Taiwan, and the PRC (Shanghai), to examine generalizability of a generic work‐stress model to the Chinese societies. It further examined the sub‐cultural differences in the work‐stress processes, by drawing contrast of the PRC and Taiwan. In addition, roles of emic constructs of Chinese primary and secondary control beliefs were also examined. Results showed that the generic work‐stress model could be reasonably applied to Chinese urban work contexts in the PRC and Taiwan. Work stress related as expected to strain effects. At a more refined sub‐cultural level, it was found that different sources of work stress became salient contributors to strain outcomes in the PRC and Taiwan. These differences reflect the diverse political, social, and economic characteristics of the two Chinese societies. More importantly, emic constructs of Chinese control beliefs were found to have rather consistent direct effects on strain outcomes. However, indirect (moderating) effects of control beliefs were not strong and inconsistent.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article

Michelle Gander, Antonia Girardi and Megan Paull

Human capital is a key component of the success of organisations, and career development of staff is a vital component to both increasing and retaining human capital…

Abstract

Purpose

Human capital is a key component of the success of organisations, and career development of staff is a vital component to both increasing and retaining human capital. Universities are no different, their people are key to their mission. There has been limited rigorous study of the careers of professional staff in the academy. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review methodology resulted in a review of 23 articles dedicated to research on careers of professional staff in higher education (HE). Thematic analysis identified a series of enablers and barriers that influence career development and progression.

Findings

Career enablers and barriers have been found to exist at both the institutional and individual levels. Within the HE context, professional staff have a hybrid career mindset, desiring traditional and more contemporary career factors, leading to a reciprocal relationship between the organisation and the individual.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for future research to investigate the hybrid career mindset, and the reciprocal relationship, both to add depth to understanding of careers for professional staff in universities, and to examine this in other settings.

Practical implications

Universities may need to consider ways to integrate institutional support for high performance work systems (HPWS) with opportunities for professional staff, while individuals may need to consider adopting career self-management behaviours (CSMB) to fit their hybrid mindset.

Originality/value

This review has highlighted organisations and individuals will benefit if the relationship between HPWS and CSMB is better understood for the hybrid career mindset.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article

Nutchapongpol Kongchasing and Gritsada Sua-iam

The purpose of this paper is to study and prioritize the problems impacted on construction work together migrant laborers, by using the Delphi technique. The case study is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study and prioritize the problems impacted on construction work together migrant laborers, by using the Delphi technique. The case study is construction work in Bangkok and metropolitan zones, Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework of the perceived issues caused by working with migrant construction labors especially migrant construction laborers from neighboring countries were identified from literature reviews. The issue list was sent to 162 experts seeking for their opinions. Subsequently, a questionnaire was created from 58 items of suitable issue lists according to expert's opinions. The questionnaires were then submitted to 147 respondents from construction contractor companies. Their responses were calculated and prioritized by means of the Delphi technique

Findings

The polling data showed its constancy on the second round of survey. There were 34 out of 58 items passed consensus criteria. The issue “Foreman obtained incompetent or inadequate trained migrant labors when relocate them from/to other site or job” ranked 1st in priority ranking with the average score of 4.56. Subproblems were appropriately prioritized according to their mean scores.

Practical implications

The results of this research were expected to facilitate construction operators in making appropriate decisions and primary solution concerning main issue factors in working with migrant labors, in order to help even more increasing competition efficiency in Thai construction industries.

Originality/value

The research provides a list of main issue occurred in the case study. These outcomes are also expected to provide important information for other case studies on the issue working with migrant construction labor.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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