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Book part

Tetsushi Fujimoto, Sayaka K. Shinohara and Tsuyoshi Oohira

This study examines the impact of work-to-family conflict (WFC) on depression for employed husbands and wives in Japan, the moderating role of own psychological family…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the impact of work-to-family conflict (WFC) on depression for employed husbands and wives in Japan, the moderating role of own psychological family involvement in the relationship between WFC and depression, and the moderating role of spouses’ family and job involvement in the relationship between WFC and depression.

Methodology/approach

We use a matched sample of Japanese employed husbands and wives to examine the relationships between inter-spousal dynamics about work–family conflict and psychological well-being.

Findings

We found that (1) the effect of WFC on depression was larger for wives, (2) husbands’ and wives’ own psychological family involvement did not moderate the relationship between WFC and their depression, and (3) spousal family and job involvement operated as a moderator only for husbands. While WFC reduced husbands’ depression when their wives were highly involved in their jobs psychologically and behaviorally, WFC increased husbands’ depression when their wives were highly involved in family at both psychological and behavioral levels.

Practical implications

Employers need to take into account the importance of looking simultaneously at the ways employed husbands and wives work when trying to understand how workplace conditions may be changed to ameliorate psychological well-being for spouses.

Originality/value of chapter

This study suggests that an experience of conflict between work and family is likely to deteriorate the psychological well-being for employed husbands and wives in non-Western contexts like Japan. Furthermore, spousal involvements in family and work domains are likely to play moderating roles in the relationship between WFC and depression.

Details

Family Relationships and Familial Responses to Health Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-015-5

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Article

James L. Price

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool…

Abstract

Addresses the standardization of the measurements and the labels for concepts commonly used in the study of work organizations. As a reference handbook and research tool, seeks to improve measurement in the study of work organizations and to facilitate the teaching of introductory courses in this subject. Focuses solely on work organizations, that is, social systems in which members work for money. Defines measurement and distinguishes four levels: nominal, ordinal, interval and ratio. Selects specific measures on the basis of quality, diversity, simplicity and availability and evaluates each measure for its validity and reliability. Employs a set of 38 concepts ‐ ranging from “absenteeism” to “turnover” as the handbook’s frame of reference. Concludes by reviewing organizational measurement over the past 30 years and recommending future measurement reseach.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 18 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article

Anna Frances Carmon and Judy C. Pearson

The purpose of this paper is to examine how family member employees’ communicative experiences within their families affect their perceptions of the workplace. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how family member employees’ communicative experiences within their families affect their perceptions of the workplace. The influence of family business employees’ perceptions of family communication patterns on family satisfaction, family involvement, and work involvement within their family businesses were explored.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 138 family business employees, representing 81 family businesses, were surveyed. The questionnaire contained measures of family communication patterns, family involvement, work involvement, family satisfaction, as well as several demographic questions. Path modeling was used to analyze two proposed models of family involvement and work involvement.

Findings

Conversation orientation was related to perceptions of family satisfaction and perceptions of family satisfaction were related to perceptions of family involvement. While both proposed models were consistent with the data, no significant relationships were found between conformity orientation and perceptions of family satisfaction and between perceptions of family satisfaction and work involvement.

Originality/value

While not only exploring family business employees’ experiences through a unique communicative lens, this study also provides several practical implications for family business owners and managers.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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Article

Kuang‐Hsun Shih, Yin‐Ru Hsieh and Binshan Lin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between two variables, self‐efficacy and job involvement, of internal auditors of companies. It also aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between two variables, self‐efficacy and job involvement, of internal auditors of companies. It also aims to explore its intervention on self‐efficacy and job involvement using organizational power as another variable.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey is conducted on 600 publicly listed Taiwanese companies that have subsidiaries in China. A total of 600 questionnaires are distributed to their internal auditors.

Findings

The results show that there is a significant and positive correlation between self‐efficacy and job involvement of internal auditors. Organizational control power does not exhibit intervening effects on self‐efficacy or job involvement.

Practical implications

This paper can offer a new perspective for managers of internal auditors because internal auditors' self‐efficacy can influence job involvement. Therefore, at the same time of supervising internal auditors, managers should not overlook the need to strengthen internal auditors' self‐efficacy.

Originality/value

Past discussions on internal auditors are widespread. However, the conclusion of this paper, which is focused on the exploration of the relationship between self‐efficacy and job involvement, can offer a different insight on the internal auditor domain.

Details

International Journal of Accounting & Information Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1834-7649

Keywords

Content available
Book part

Peter Boxall, Meng-Long Huo, Keith Macky and Jonathan Winterton

High-involvement work processes (HIWPs) are associated with high levels of employee influence over the work process, such as high levels of control over how to handle…

Abstract

High-involvement work processes (HIWPs) are associated with high levels of employee influence over the work process, such as high levels of control over how to handle individual job tasks or a high level of involvement at team or workplace level in designing work procedures. When implementations of HIWPs are accompanied by companion investments in human capital – for example, in better information and training, higher pay and stronger employee voice – it is appropriate to talk not only of HIWPs but of “high-involvement work systems” (HIWSs). This chapter reviews the theory and practice of HIWPs and HIWSs. Across a range of academic perspectives and societies, it has regularly been argued that steps to enhance employee involvement in decision-making create better opportunities to perform, better utilization of skill and human potential, and better employee motivation, leading, in turn, to various improvements in organizational and employee outcomes.

However, there are also costs to increased employee involvement and the authors review the important economic and sociopolitical contingencies that help to explain the incidence or distribution of HIWPs and HIWSs. The authors also review the research on the outcomes of higher employee involvement for firms and workers, discuss the quality of the research methods used, and consider the tensions with which the model is associated. This chapter concludes with an outline of the research agenda, envisaging an ongoing role for both quantitative and qualitative studies. Without ignoring the difficulties involved, the authors argue, from the societal perspective, that the high-involvement pathway should be considered one of the most important vectors available to improve the quality of work and employee well-being.

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Article

Nikos Bozionelos

The relationship between the big five of personality and work involvement was investigated in a questionnaire study with a sample of 279 white‐collar workers, who were…

Abstract

The relationship between the big five of personality and work involvement was investigated in a questionnaire study with a sample of 279 white‐collar workers, who were employed on a full‐time basis in clerical, administrative and managerial positions. Hypotheses were tested by means of hierarchical regressions that controlled for the effects of demographics and human capital. Scores on agreeableness were negatively related to scores on work involvement and to total hours worked per week; and the extroversion × openness interaction made a positive contribution to scores on work involvement. Overall, the findings suggest the existence of an, albeit not strong or extensive, relationship between the big five of personality and work involvement. The limitations of the study and its implications for practice are discussed.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article

Hsi-An Shih and Nikodemus Hans Setiadi Wijaya

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize the links among team-member exchange (TMX), voice behavior, and creative work involvement.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize the links among team-member exchange (TMX), voice behavior, and creative work involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 260 employees were participants in this study. All were alumni of a Business School in Indonesia. Data were gathered at two time points four months apart. Hierarchical regression and bootstrapping analyses were conducted to find the effects of TMX on voice behavior and creative work involvement.

Findings

Results from the analyses showed positive effects of TMX on both voice behavior and creative work involvement. A positive effect of voice behavior on creative work involvement was found. The results also exhibited a partial mediating effect of voice behavior on the relationship between TMX and creative work involvement.

Practical implications

The findings point to the importance of maintaining TMX quality in work teams for enhancing employee voice and creativity. Organizations may need to develop members’ reciprocal relationship skill in teams and maintain the roles of team leaders to develop the quality of TMX. It is also suggested that the practice of self-management teams may enhance the quality of TMX and voice behavior of employees.

Originality/value

This paper offers new insight on how levels of TMX may impact on members’ voice behavior and creative work involvement. Longitudinal data may provide a more accurate prediction of the links among TMX, voice behavior, and creative work involvement.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article

Pam Allis and Michael O'Driscoll

The paper seeks to examine whether spillover from “nonwork” to work contributes to individuals' well‐being.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to examine whether spillover from “nonwork” to work contributes to individuals' well‐being.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was administered to New Zealand local government employees. Positive (facilitation) and negative (conflict) spillover from two “nonwork” domains (family and personal benefit activities) to work were investigated. The survey also assessed psychological involvement (in work, family and personal benefit activities), time devoted to each domain, and self‐reported well‐being in each area.

Findings

Levels of nonwork‐to‐work facilitation were moderate, and significantly higher than nonwork‐to‐work conflict, and well‐being was moderately high (although greater for the family and personal benefit domains than for work). There were significant positive relationships between psychological involvement in the nonwork domains and levels of facilitation from these domains to work, and nonwork‐to‐work facilitation was associated with higher well‐being. Time invested in family and personal activities was not linked with greater nonwork‐to‐work conflict. Mediation analyses indicated that psychological involvement (in family and personal activities) was associated with increased facilitation, which in turn enhanced well‐being.

Practical implications

Engagement in family and personal benefit activities yields positive outcomes for individuals, in terms of their psychological well‐being and facilitation of work‐related outcomes. Encouragement to engage in these areas can therefore be beneficial for both individuals and their employing organizations.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this research is that involvement in personal benefit activities (as another component of the “nonwork” domain, in addition to family activities) can have positive outcomes for individuals, resulting in facilitation of work outcomes and positive well‐being.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article

Adya Hermawati, Suhermin and Rahayu Puji

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of transglobal leadership on quality of work-life, job involvement and its impact on the performance of micro, small…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of transglobal leadership on quality of work-life, job involvement and its impact on the performance of micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) employees throughout Malang Raya.

Design/methodology/approach

The population of the paper was all of MSME employees in Malang Raya and MSME developing in East Java regions, namely Sidoarjo, Pasuruan District, Pasuruan City, Kediri District, Jombang, Surabaya City, Blitar City and Blitar District. This paper uses GSCA for several reasons. First, it uses a structural model (involving several endogenous variables). Second, it involves unobservable variables that require a measurement model (variable measurement of the indicators). Third, it needs a comparative model testing that compares several groups of objects using the multigroup GSCA.

Findings

Transglobal leadership has a significant effect on quality of work life and job involvement in the five regions. It also has a significant effect on employee performance in the four regions, except Malang Regency. Quality of work life has a significant effect on job involvement in two regions, namely Malang City and Malang Regency, but not in the other three regions. Quality of work life and job involvement together has a significant effect on employee performance in all study sites.

Originality/value

These gaps motivate the researchers to comprehensively examine the relationship between QWL and employee performance, QWL and job involvement and job involvement and employee performance – these are the originality of the present study, in addition to different research locations. Small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Malang are divided into three main groups, namely manufacturing business, merchandising business and service business.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article

Peter E. Mudrack

Naughton proposed that workaholism may result from a combination of high job involvement with an obsessive‐compulsive personality. This study was designed specifically to…

Abstract

Naughton proposed that workaholism may result from a combination of high job involvement with an obsessive‐compulsive personality. This study was designed specifically to elaborate upon and to explore this proposal. Both obsessive‐compulsive personality and workaholism, however, seem to be multidimensional rather than unidimensional variables, and their multidimensional nature needed clarification before the study could proceed. Obsessive‐compulsive personality consisted of six distinct traits: obstinacy, orderliness, parsimony, perseverance, rigidity, and superego. Workaholism was operationalized as having two behavioral components: tendencies both to engage in non‐required work activities, and to intrude actively on the work of others. This study predicted specifically that high job involvement coupled with high scores on the obstinacy, orderliness, rigidity, and superego traits would lead to high scores on tendencies to engage in non‐required work. These four predictions received some support in data emerging from a sample of 278 employed persons, although support was strongest for the obstinacy and superego traits. These results add to understanding of the work attitude of job involvement given its associations with some obsessive‐compulsive traits, suggest the relevance of obsessive‐compulsive personality in non‐clinical settings, and add to understanding of the phenomenon of workaholism as behavioral tendencies.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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