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1 – 10 of over 194000
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Steven P. Brown and Thomas W. Leigh

Questions regarding what motivates people to perform their best and feel good about their jobs are of enduring interest to managers and researchers. Understanding the…

Abstract

Questions regarding what motivates people to perform their best and feel good about their jobs are of enduring interest to managers and researchers. Understanding the motives that impel top performance and make work satisfying can facilitate superior organisational performance and development of a healthy and productive organisational culture. Developing accurate models of the role of work‐related effort in generating performance and attitudinal outcomes is central to such an understanding and is the focus of our research. In particular, we have studied how effort affects work performance and job satisfaction in personal selling contexts.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 18 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Alisher Tohirovich Dedahanov, Siyuan Miao and Aleksey Aleksandrovich Semyonov

The purpose of this study is to examine the boundary condition roles of cognitive reappraisal and rumination in the link between abusive supervision and work effort.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the boundary condition roles of cognitive reappraisal and rumination in the link between abusive supervision and work effort.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 545 highly skilled employees of manufacturing companies. We excluded 161 of these questionnaires because they were incomplete and used 384 questionnaires in the analyses. To assess the validity of proposed hypotheses, we conducted hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

The results indicate that cognitive reappraisal weakens the negative link between abusive supervision and work effort. Moreover, individuals who ruminate tend to exhibit reduced work effort when they experience abusive behavior from their supervisors.

Originality/value

This study is the first to investigate the moderating roles of cognitive reappraisal and rumination in the link between abusive supervision and work effort. The findings can help organizations understand the situations when abusive supervision decreases levels of work effort among employees and when subordinates maintain their levels of work effort.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Martha Crowley, Julianne Payne and Earl Kennedy

Labor process research has documented a shift in the nature of control – from techniques that aim to limit worker discretion to consent-oriented controls that are believed…

Abstract

Labor process research has documented a shift in the nature of control – from techniques that aim to limit worker discretion to consent-oriented controls that are believed to generate greater effort by increasing intrinsic rewards or bonding employees to managers and/or the firm. Over the past several decades, however, growing pressure to increase profits has prompted firms to adopt cost-cutting strategies that have eroded job security, relationships with management and commitment to organizational goals. This study investigates how a changing labor process and rising job insecurity shape workers’ orientations toward work, managers and the firm, and in turn influence workplace behavior. Analyses of content-coded data on 212 work groups confirms that discretion-limiting controls (supervision, technology and rules) are associated with more negative orientations and/or reductions in effort (with variations across distinct forms of control), while investment in workers’ human capital (but not involvement of workers in decision-making) has the reverse effect – ­generating more positive orientations toward work, managers and the firm, and (in turn) promoting discretionary work effort and limiting covert effort restriction. Implications of insecurity are more complex. Both layoffs and temporary employment reduce commitment to the organization, but layoffs generate conflict with management without reducing effort, whereas temporary employment limits effort without producing conflict. We illuminate underlying processes with evidence from the qualitative case studies.

Details

Professional Work: Knowledge, Power and Social Inequalities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-210-9

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2022

Ying Liu, Yongmei Liu and Bo Sophia Xiao

This study explored whether crowdsourcing work characteristics are associated with perceived work effort in competitive crowdsourcing markets. The study also investigated…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explored whether crowdsourcing work characteristics are associated with perceived work effort in competitive crowdsourcing markets. The study also investigated the important contextual variables and internal mechanisms related to perceived work effort.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was posted as a crowdsourcing task on China's Time Fortune website. Data from 231 valid questionnaires were analyzed using SmartPLS 3.

Findings

Crowdsourcing workers' intrinsic and extrinsic motivations were significantly and positively correlated with their perceived work effort. Task autonomy and feedback were significantly and positively correlated with intrinsic motivation. Skill variety, task significance, task identity, and task clarity had no significant correlations with intrinsic motivation. However, task clarity was significantly and positively correlated with perceived work effort. Moreover, the relationship between workers' trust in task requesters and perceived work effort was fully mediated by intrinsic motivation.

Originality/value

This study extended the job characteristic model into the virtual competitive crowdsourcing market. The authors verified the relationship between task clarity/trust in task requesters and workers' motivation and perceived work effort.

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Evan J. Douglas and Robyn J. Morris

There is a lack of theoretical development on the question of why people work long hours and the nature of “workaholism”. This paper seeks to demonstrate a variety of…

5319

Abstract

Purpose

There is a lack of theoretical development on the question of why people work long hours and the nature of “workaholism”. This paper seeks to demonstrate a variety of reasons that induce a person to work “excessively”.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discerns three subcategories of the “work enthusiast”: “materialist”, “the low‐leisure” and the “perkaholic” hard workers. It is demonstrated that these work enthusiasts work long hours for relatively high job satisfaction, while workaholics gain relatively low job satisfaction. Inflicting negative externalities on fellow workers is argued to be a separate issue – any one of the hard workers might irk their fellow workers by working “too hard” or by their individual mannerisms. This paper uses the economist's utility‐maximization model to build a conceptual model of voluntary work effort that explains the work effort decision of individuals.

Findings

Individuals will work long hours when motivated to do so by the satisfaction they derive separately and collectively from income (materialism); leisure; perquisites; and work per se. It is argued that only the person who is strongly motivated by the latter reason is properly called a workaholic, and that the imposition of negative externalities on co‐workers is a separate issue that might also involve work enthusiasts.

Originality/value

The paper advances the understanding of work motivation and workaholic behavior and presents a series of researchable propositions for empirical testing.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Robert Buch, Bård Kuvaas, Anders Dysvik and Birgit Schyns

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize social leader-member exchange (SLMX) and economic leader-member exchange (ELMX) as two separate dimensions of leader-member…

2119

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize social leader-member exchange (SLMX) and economic leader-member exchange (ELMX) as two separate dimensions of leader-member exchange, and examines how intrinsic work motivation moderates their relationship with follower work effort.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from 352 employee-leader dyads from the public health sector in Norway (response rate=61.9 percent). Hierarchical linear modeling was used to test the relationship between subordinate rated SLMX and ELMX relationships and leader ratings of work effort.

Findings

This study replicates prior research showing that SLMX is positively related and ELMX negatively related to followers’ work effort. A significant interaction between SLMX and intrinsic motivation is also revealed, suggesting that SLMX relationships are important with respect to work effort for followers who exhibit lower levels of intrinsic work motivation.

Research limitations/implications

The data were cross-sectional, thus prohibiting causal inferences.

Practical implications

SLMX relationships may be particularly important for the work effort of followers low in intrinsic motivation. Leaders may draw on this finding and seek to aid the development of the relationship by means of relationship-oriented behaviors.

Originality/value

Given the importance of maximizing the performance of all the followers, a better understanding of the conditions under which SLMX and ELMX relationships relate to work effort is particularly important. The present study advances knowledge on SLMX and ELMX relationships by demonstrating how intrinsic motivation moderates how SLMX and ELMX relationships relate to follower work effort.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2021

Brenda A. Barker Scott and Michael R. Manning

Ask leaders what their organizations need more of to thrive, and many will identify collaboration. Yet many collaborative efforts fail. A focus on the inner workings of…

Abstract

Ask leaders what their organizations need more of to thrive, and many will identify collaboration. Yet many collaborative efforts fail. A focus on the inner workings of teams, to the exclusion of the ecosystem in which teams work, has masked the importance of a collaborative context. We undertook a single case study of an exemplar firm with the intent of offering a nuanced illustration of the collaborative workplace. We illustrate how three contextual factors related to work, relationships, and behaviors shift the setting from a place where collaboration is hard to do, to one that embodies collaboration as a widespread competence.

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Carol Reade

The competitive international environment of the twenty‐first century is said to require greater collaboration between the multinational corporation (MNC) units, where…

3410

Abstract

The competitive international environment of the twenty‐first century is said to require greater collaboration between the multinational corporation (MNC) units, where local employees work toward global as well as local goals. What does it take to motivate local employees to go the extra mile for the sake of the MNC as a whole? This article reports the results of a study conducted among 317 local managers at the Indian and Pakistani subsidiaries of a British MNC in the consumer products industry. Organisational identification, or a psychological bonding with the organisation, was one of several factors contributing to the willingness of local managers to exert extra effort toward organisational goals. Implications of the findings are drawn for expatriate managers who work alongside local managers, and for international human resource management.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Keun S. Lee and Songpol Kulviwat

This research examines the linkage between commitment (organizational and job), motivation (intrinsic and extrinsic), and work outcomes (effort and propensity to leave…

1600

Abstract

This research examines the linkage between commitment (organizational and job), motivation (intrinsic and extrinsic), and work outcomes (effort and propensity to leave) using the Korean sample. With its focus on the relative impact of loyalty‐based commitment and incentive‐based motivation on work outcome behavior, this study highlights Confucian culture and expectancy theory. Using survey data, support was found for all the hypotheses except the paths from job involvement to effort. In particular, organizational commitment was found to have the highest influence on effort and propensity to leave, presenting empirical support for the eminence of loyalty as a motivational tool in a collectivistic work culture. Managerial implications and future research are discussed.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 194000