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Book part

Efrat Shokef and Miriam Erez

As part of the globalizing work environment, new forms of organizations have emerged, ranging from international to multinational and transnational organizations. These…

Abstract

As part of the globalizing work environment, new forms of organizations have emerged, ranging from international to multinational and transnational organizations. These forms of organizations require high levels of cross-national interdependence, and often the formation of multicultural teams (MCTs), nested within multinational organizations. Employees who operate in the global multinational context should share common meanings, values, and codes of behaviors in order to effectively communicate with each other and coordinate their activities. What helps global multicultural team members create the social glue that connects them to each other, above and beyond the national cultures to which they belong? We propose that a more macro-level meaning system of a global work culture, which is the shared understanding of the visible rules, regulations, and behaviors, and the deeper values and ethics of the global work context, that is formed outside of the level of national cultures, binds members of MCTs. At the individual level, the representation of these global work values in the self leads to the emergence of a global identity, which is an individual's sense of belonging to and identification with groups (such as MCTs), operating in the global work environment of multinational organizations. The chapter focuses on the potential influence of a global work culture, and of a global identity on the effectiveness of MCTs.

Details

National Culture and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-362-4

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Abstract

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Understanding Intercultural Interaction: An Analysis of Key Concepts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-397-0

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Book part

Anja-Kristin Abendroth and Mareike Reimann

The aim of this chapter is to investigate the context dependence of the implications of telework for work–family conflict. It examines whether and how the implications of…

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to investigate the context dependence of the implications of telework for work–family conflict. It examines whether and how the implications of telework for strain-based and time-based work–family conflict depend on work–family-supportive and high-demand workplace cultures. Based on a sample of 4,898 employees derived from a unique linked employer–employee study involving large organizations in different industries in Germany, multilevel fixed-effects regressions were estimated.

The results show that telework is associated with perceived higher levels of both time-based and strain-based work–family conflict, and that this is partly related to overtime work involved in telework. However, teleworkers experience higher levels of work–family conflict if they perceive their workplace culture to be highly demanding, and lower levels if supervisor work–family support is readily available.

Future research is required to investigate how the conclusions from this research vary between heterogonous employees and how work–family-supportive and high-demand workplace cultures interrelate in their implications on the use of telework for work–family conflict.

The findings show how important it is to implement telework in a way that not only accommodates employers’ interest in flexibilization, but that it also makes it possible to reconcile work with a family life that involves high levels of responsibility.

This is the first study which examines whether telework is either a resource that reduces or a demand that promotes work–family conflict by focusing on whether this depends on perceived workplace culture.

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The Work-Family Interface: Spillover, Complications, and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-112-4

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Article

Tanuja Agarwala, Amaia Arizkuren, Elsa Del Castillo and Marta Muñiz

To understand whether the three dimensions of work–family culture, namely managerial support, negative consequences and organizational time demands relate in different…

Abstract

Purpose

To understand whether the three dimensions of work–family culture, namely managerial support, negative consequences and organizational time demands relate in different ways with different types of commitment; affective, continuance and normative. The relationships were examined in a three-country cross-national context.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire survey was conducted in India, Peru and Spain among executives and managers drawn from both the manufacturing and the services sectors.

Findings

The three countries were both similar and different with Peru and Spain more similar to each other than with India. Managerial support dimension of work–family culture predicted affective commitment across all the three countries. Differences were found with respect to predictors of normative commitment. Managerial support predicted normative commitment for Spain. Lower negative career consequences resulted in decreased normative commitment among the managers in Peru and Spain.

Research limitations/implications

The study has limitations of generalizability and common method variance.

Practical implications

Human resource managers will find the study useful to determine which dimensions of work–family culture would predict the outcomes desired. The study has implications for the design of human resource practices in the industry.

Originality/value

The study is the first that addresses the three dimensions of work–family culture and organizational commitment in a cross-national context. The study suggests that the way in which work–family culture is conceptualized and experienced by employees may vary even among countries classified as “collectivist.”

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article

Isabel de Sivatte, Judith R. Gordon, Pilar Rojo and Ricardo Olmos

The purpose of this paper is to test the relationship of work-life culture and organizational productivity and determine if it is mediated by the availability of work-life…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the relationship of work-life culture and organizational productivity and determine if it is mediated by the availability of work-life programs.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative data for the study were collected using three sources: an original survey completed by managers of 195 different companies, archival data from two databases, and archival data published in three national surveys. Hypotheses were tested using path analyses.

Findings

The data reveals that work-life culture has no direct effect on labor productivity but does have an indirect effect on it, through the availability of work-life programs.

Research limitations/implications

One of the study’s limitations is that its design is cross-sectional. The authors suggest that future longitudinal studies examine the impact of work-life culture on organizational outcomes.

Practical implications

Practitioners should note the importance of promoting a favorable work-life culture and offering work-life programs as they enhance labor productivity.

Originality/value

The authors examine the impact of work-life culture on organizational productivity, a relatively understudied relationship at the organizational level.

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Article

Suharno Pawirosumarto, Purwanto Katijan Sarjana and Rachmad Gunawan

The purpose of this paper is to determine the effect of the work environment, leadership style and organizational culture on job satisfaction and its implication toward…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the effect of the work environment, leadership style and organizational culture on job satisfaction and its implication toward the performance of the employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The research population was the whole 642 employees of Parador Hotels and Resorts, Indonesia. The amount of the samples was determined with the formula of Slovin, and the Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) sample consideration was equal to 200 employees. As many as 179 questionnaires were returned and sent for analysis. Proportionate stratified sampling was used for the sampling technique, and sample elements were determined by accidental sampling method. The analytical method used in this study was descriptive statistics and SEM–Partial Least Square with IBM Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (IBM SPSS) Statistics 22.0 software and WarpPLS 3.0 program.

Findings

The results show that work environment, leadership style and organizational culture have a positive and significant impact on job satisfaction, but only the leadership style has a positive and significant effect on the employee performance. Job satisfaction does not give a significant and positive effect on employee performance and it is not a mediating variable.

Originality/value

As indicated by the findings, the role of leaders in hotel industry, in this case general manager (gm), is of importance. Without a high-quality gm, job satisfaction and organizational culture will not be achieved.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 59 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

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Article

Mariusz Tomasz Wolonciej

The purpose of this paper is to introduce new perspectives on the job position analysis practice rooted in the traditional person-job fit approach. It highlights selected…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce new perspectives on the job position analysis practice rooted in the traditional person-job fit approach. It highlights selected theoretical assumptions and the case of a company challenged by hidden cultural constraints on the work environment. The author attempts to show how human resources management may benefit from incorporating the aspect of cultural traits in job position analysis. Next, the author provides a regulatory definition of a job position culture, followed by practical guidelines to facilitate a better person-job fit across various work environments.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opts for a conceptual contribution by introducing a new term “job position culture” as, companies are challenged by new management difficulties when creating universal job position descriptions and a better person-job fit. The paper highlights the need of including additional, cultural aspects of the work environment to better manage organizational change.

Findings

The paper shows how cultural traits could be implemented in human resources management such as recruitment and selection, as well as efficient job position management. A regulatory definition of job position culture is proposed, and some practical implications for a more complete organizational change management in job cultures.

Research limitations/implications

The regulatory definition for the job position culture, presented in the paper, is at the preliminary and theoretical stage. It requires being operationalized and implemented it in each job analysis case.

Practical implications

The new, cultural perspective on the job analysis may serve for the more adequate fit of personnel to the work environment and better manage organizational change including distinct job cultures.

Social implications

The cultural perspective on a job analysis may serve a more adequate fit and work satisfaction of workers resulting in job attachment and better work performance.

Originality/value

The paper shows the need to study additional work environment traits on the bases of the regulatory definition of job position culture.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article

Maria Peeters, Cobi Wattez, Evangelia Demerouti and Wietske de Regt

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether work‐family (WF) interference functions as an explaining mechanism in the link between work‐family culture and well‐being…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether work‐family (WF) interference functions as an explaining mechanism in the link between work‐family culture and well‐being, hereby distinguishing between a negative and a positive process. The negative, energy depleting process initiates from a hindrance work‐family culture and ends up to burnout through the experience of work‐family conflict. The positive, motivation generating process initiates from a supportive work‐family culture and ends up to work engagement through work‐family enrichment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a quantitative study among employees from three different organizations (n=516).

Findings

Work‐family conflict fully mediates the relationship between a hindrance WF‐culture and the exhaustion dimension of burnout and partially mediates the relationship between a hindrance WF‐culture and the cynicism dimension of burnout. With regard to the mediational role of work‐family enrichment the results also confirm the paper's hypothesis. Work‐family enrichment partially mediates the relationship between a supportive WF‐culture and work engagement. Interestingly, analyses of some alternative mediational paths reveal some additional findings. Specifically, a supportive work‐family culture relates to work engagement through the perception of less work‐family conflict. Moreover, a supportive culture is also related to less feelings of burnout through work‐family enrichment.

Originality/value

The study shows that it pays off to invest in a supportive work‐family culture because such a culture contributes to work engagement and in the same time helps to prevent burnout.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Book part

Darren Wishart, Bevan Rowland and Klaire Somoray

Driving for work has been identified as potentially one of the riskiest activities performed by workers within the course of their working day. Jurisdictions around the…

Abstract

Driving for work has been identified as potentially one of the riskiest activities performed by workers within the course of their working day. Jurisdictions around the world have passed legislation and adopted policy and procedures to improve the safety of workers. However, particularly within the work driving setting, complying with legislation and the minimum safety standards and procedures is not sufficient to improve work driving safety. This chapter outlines the manner in which safety citizenship behavior can offer further improvement to work-related driving safety by acting as a complementary paradigm to improve risk management and current models and applications of safety culture.

Research on concepts associated with risk management and theoretical frameworks associated with safety culture and safety citizenship behavior are reviewed, along with their practical application within the work driving safety setting. A model incorporating safety citizenship behavior as a complementary paradigm to safety culture is proposed. It is suggested that this model provides a theoretical framework to inform future research directions aimed at improving safety within the work driving setting.

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Article

Salomé Goñi, Pilar Corredor and Consuelo León

This research addresses how companies develop a process of transformation to a more family responsible behaviour and the role that women play in this process. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

This research addresses how companies develop a process of transformation to a more family responsible behaviour and the role that women play in this process. This paper aims to propose a model in which a female workforce is seen as contributing to the development of the family responsible firm. The model includes two paths for transformation, the supportive work–family culture and the managerial strategy for work–family using a mediation model. The analysis was performed in a sample of 1,048 Spanish firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested using Baron and Kenny’s (1986) mediated regression technique, the Sobel’s test (1982) and a bootstrap re-sampling with 5,000 and 10,000 iterations to determine the significance of the mediation.

Findings

The results confirm the impact of the proportion of women in the workforce on organizational culture and managerial strategy, factors that lead to a real increase in the accessibility of work–family policies. The mediation effect is total.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations stemming from the survey used and from the cross-sectional data.

Practical implications

The role of women, the culture and managers in promoting work–family policies appears clear. The need for the active reinforcement of the supportive work–family culture in companies and managerial strategy, diffusion, planning and involvement are all key factors in the development of work–family policies.

Social implications

Governments and society as a whole should urge firms to use all means at their disposal to guarantee the formal adoption of work–family policies.

Originality/value

Research that analyses the way in which work–family culture and the managerial strategy for work–family generate change does not usually incorporate the female component of the labour force as an explanatory element.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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