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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Deirdre O'Shea and Melrona Kirrane

The purpose of the paper is to focus on personal and social background factors as potential channels for the transmission of work related attitudes in young adults. The…

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2452

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to focus on personal and social background factors as potential channels for the transmission of work related attitudes in young adults. The paper aims to examine the extent to which gender, parental job type, job status, and education, as well as school experience, influence the development of attitudes towards work and family life.

Design/methodology/approach

The study comprised a quantitative (questionnaire based) survey with a sample of 782 final year undergraduate students attending various third level institutions in Ireland and the USA.

Findings

The results indicated that individuals who had grown up in traditional mixed families had more positive attitudes towards balancing work and home roles than did those who had grown up in traditional single earner families. Father's educational level also emerged as a significant factor in the career‐family attitudes of the participants.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this research indicate that young people have developed attitudes towards managing the work/family interface on entering the workforce, which they acquire through a social learning process. Limitations included the cross‐sectional nature of the design and future longitudinal research is needed.

Practical implications

Organizations and managers need to be aware of the well‐developed attitudes of new entrants in order to address early issues of psychological contract and person‐organizational fit, which have an impact on career success and career management.

Originality/value

The findings of the paper break new ground on the role of social learning on the formation of attitudes towards managing the work‐family interface. Such attitudes proceed to inform behavioral patterns and decisions in the harmonious management of the two domains.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2018

Amnah Al-asqah

The purpose of this paper is to identify the students’ attitudes towards private sector work during study.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the students’ attitudes towards private sector work during study.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a comprehensive social survey (including questionnaire and interviewing) distributed to experts in departments and colleges in King Saud University and Princess Nora University.

Findings

This study found that students’ attitudes can be influenced by the financial and social security achieved through private work during study, and the personal development of job skills. Whereas society’s inferior view to private work, study and working hours’ conflicts, and the insufficient information about private work during study are some of the negative factors that influence their attitudes. It also emphasised the role of the private sector in influencing such attitudes by advertising job opportunities for students, giving them flexible work hours and providing training programmes. This study concludes with a proposal suggesting how to modify students’ attitudes towards private sector work during study.

Originality/value

This paper identifies the students’ attitudes towards private sector work during study and suggests a proposal that contributes to support students’ positive attitudes and adjust the negative ones; thus, helping to reduce the unemployment rate among young people.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 60 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Raymond H.M. Fok and Ruth M. W. Yeung

– This study aims to explore the factors that affect the work attitudes of Generation Y towards the hotel industry in Macau from the perspective of senior management.

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3859

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the factors that affect the work attitudes of Generation Y towards the hotel industry in Macau from the perspective of senior management.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a purposeful sampling method, an in-depth interview with five executives in the hotel industry who are having a supervisory or managerial role from different departments and types of hotels was undertaken; the executives have a supervisory or managerial role from different departments and types of hotel.

Findings

The results reveal that attitudes of Generation Y lack the key aspects that potential staff should carry, but organizational culture and human resource management strategies, as well as external environment, can influence Generation Y’s work attitudes and loyalty. The findings also indicate that building Generation Y’s positive work attitudes and moderating the negatives are vital roles of human resource management strategy to maintain service performance.

Originality/value

A comprehensive Generation Y work-attitude framework is developed, and this study incorporates practitioner engagement in real-world practice, which impacts upon service performance in the hotel industry.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Ranjita Misra and Bhagaban Panigrahi

Examines attitudes regarding female labour force participation among people of different ages using National Opinion Research Centre Social Survey data. Focuses…

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2312

Abstract

Examines attitudes regarding female labour force participation among people of different ages using National Opinion Research Centre Social Survey data. Focuses specifically on the factors associated with a pro‐feminist attitude. Demonstrates that younger people have more positive attitudes towards women working outside their homes than do older people. Men are less pro‐feminist in their attitudes than are women. Men and women disapprove of a woman working if preschool children suffer by her working. In addition to age and gender, the factors influencing attitude are income, education, religious beliefs, urban residence, born in this country, having young children in the family or expecting more children, and work years and job security. A supportive attitude for working women was associated with higher education, higher family income, residence in urban areas, liberal viewpoints, and uncertainty about having more children. The absence of correlation between employment of women and attitudes towards participation in the workforce and between marital status and attitude were especially surprising. Discusses economic, social and political implications of the findings.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2011

Eleanor Davies and Susan Cartwright

This research aims to look at preferences for retirement, in particular, later retirement, amongst a sample of older employees in the UK in the financial services…

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2678

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to look at preferences for retirement, in particular, later retirement, amongst a sample of older employees in the UK in the financial services industry. It seeks to investigate specifically the influence of personal, psychological and psychosocial determinants of preferences for retiring later. Additionally, the study presents a typology of different retirement preferences based on psychological and psychosocial variables.

Design/methodology/approach

The data are based on questionnaires from 556 employees of a UK financial services organisation (aged 40‐60) and measures include psychological expectations of retirement (expected adjustment to retirement, attitudes towards leisure and social interaction), psychosocial attitudes (job satisfaction, intrinsic motivation, organisational comment and work commitment) and attitudes towards working beyond normal retirement age. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted and one‐way ANOVA was conducted to identify differences between groups.

Findings

The data show very negative attitudes towards working later than the normal retirement age and that expectations of adjustment to retirement were the most significant predictor towards retirement preferences, followed by work commitment. Significant differences in retirement attitudes and intentions were found between different groups of employees.

Practical implications

Some of the practical implications of the work suggest that retirement preferences are shaped only to a moderate degree by psychosocial attitudes. In seeking to retain older workers in the workforce for longer employers should encourage employees to develop strong social relationships at work and allow gradual transitions to ultimate retirement.

Originality/value

The paper looked at preferences for retirement, particularly later retirement, and found that, if employers wish to retain the knowledge, skills and expertise of their employees, then it would seem that they need to devise means of allowing people to achieve some of the more desirable aspects of retirement (greater free time, opportunity to pursue hobbies and interests) at the same time as retaining some of the benefits of work (status, professional interest, income etc.). Phased and flexible retirement initiatives therefore seem to be one of the solutions.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2013

Lourdes Susaeta, José Ramón Pin, Sandra Idrovo, Alvaro Espejo, Maria Belizón, Angela Gallifa, Marisa Aguirre and Eugenio Avila Pedrozo

The purpose of this paper is to address the subject of work attitude drivers within the current scenario considering two influencing factors, culture and generation. Both…

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2839

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the subject of work attitude drivers within the current scenario considering two influencing factors, culture and generation. Both membership of a particular generation and membership of a particular culture can affect individuals' work attitudes. The study considers these two factors in order to analyse five dimensions that are sources of work attitudes: life project, professional ethics, and attitude towards authority, leadership and commitment to the company.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon a sample of almost one thousand people from various Ibero‐American countries, the results show significant differences between generations and cultures, particularly when focusing on the life project.

Findings

Among its conclusions, the paper points out that Latin America cannot be viewed as a homogenous whole in terms of individual work attitude. On the contrary, it is characterised by a significant degree of national diversity and managers should take this into account when designing initiatives to improve employee motivation.

Originality/value

The contribution that this paper seeks to make is to include the cross‐cultural perspective in the study of attitudes towards work, which has received less attention in previous studies.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Robert H. Bennett

There is a strong tradition in cross‐cultural research to posit a relationship between culturally‐derived values and work‐related attitudes, with the most notable work

Abstract

There is a strong tradition in cross‐cultural research to posit a relationship between culturally‐derived values and work‐related attitudes, with the most notable work conducted by Hofstede (1980). The deeply‐held culturally‐derived values have a powerful influence on the specific cognitions and behaviors that workers develop. On the other hand, this research suggests that situational variables, including the workers' daily activities and work experiences, also influence work‐related attitudes. Situational demands and salient information from one's current experiences affect the nature of attitudes, and on self‐report questionnaires may explain more variation than reported deep‐seated values. Research was conducted on samples of 64 Americans and 47 Chinese workers to contrast the influences on attitudes. Situational variables were shown to strongly influence attitudinal measures, especially in the American sample. Implications for worker education and training and cross‐cultural management are offered.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 9 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2019

Noorliza Karia and Muhammad Hasmi Abu Hassan Asaari

The purpose of this paper is to understand the emergence of employee leadership attributes and, further, examine its impact on employee work-related attitudes in terms of…

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1782

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the emergence of employee leadership attributes and, further, examine its impact on employee work-related attitudes in terms of the competitive context of higher education institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

A data from a survey of 245 academic employees in Malaysian public universities were tested and analyzed on the 12 proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results reveal that the emergence of employee leadership attributes, independently, has a significantly positive effect on work-related attitudes. Specifically, executive leadership has a significantly positive effect on organizational commitment, career satisfaction and job satisfaction, while innovative leadership has a significantly positive effect on organizational commitment and career satisfaction. In contrast, adaptive and effective leadership is associated when explaining organizational commitment, career satisfaction and job satisfaction, while innovative leadership is associated when explaining job satisfaction.

Practical implications

Academic scholars/leaders in higher education should realize that the emergence of employee leadership attributes has a positive effect on work-related attitudes, such as organizational commitment, career satisfaction and job satisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper extends the knowledge regarding complexity leadership theory which explains the emergence of employee leadership attributes naturally and, further, provides empirical evidence.

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Jenell L.S. Wittmer, Agnieszka K Shepard and James E. Martin

Employees working nonstandard schedules outside the daytime hours of the Monday-Friday work week are increasing. Using Social Exchange Theory (SET), the purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Employees working nonstandard schedules outside the daytime hours of the Monday-Friday work week are increasing. Using Social Exchange Theory (SET), the purpose of this paper is to hypothesize relationships between scheduling preferences, attitudes, and retention indicators.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 343 US Postal Service mail processors (day, evening, or night shift; all shifts working weekends) from three cities. Multivariate analysis of covariance and multiple linear regression were used to test hypotheses related to participants’ perceptions of scheduling preferences and attitudes.

Findings

The authors found that preferences and attitudes toward shift worked had stronger relationships with each other and employee retention indicators for the night and evening shifts than the day shift, and these same relationships were stronger for the day shift when focussing on days of the week worked.

Research limitations/implications

Although limited by generalizability concerns, this study provides a distinctive application of SET to work schedules and offers a unique perspective on how working nonstandard days and nonstandard times, individually, impact the employment relationship.

Practical implications

Better work schedule management, with increased flexibility and control, may be one way of reducing negative employee reactions to nonstandard schedules.

Originality/value

This study goes beyond the typical examinations of standard vs nonstandard shifts, to study multiple nonstandard shifts and examines the relationships of these schedules on employee retention variables, focussing on both shift and weekend work.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

Waranpong Boonsiritomachai and Ploy Sud-On

Past research has convincingly shown that the more entrepreneurial employees are, the more likely they are to leave the organization and start their own enterprise…

Abstract

Purpose

Past research has convincingly shown that the more entrepreneurial employees are, the more likely they are to leave the organization and start their own enterprise. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to understand how entrepreneurial employees can be retained in organizations by examining the relationships between work engagement, organizational commitment and entrepreneurial attitude among entry-level employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Covariance-based structural equation modeling is used to test the hypothesized relationships by using a survey of 416 employees.

Findings

The results of the study indicate that an entrepreneurial attitude significantly and positively contributes to work engagement, although it can divert employee attention regarding the level of commitment. Interestingly, the study findings show that employees will commit to an organization if they have engaged with the company, even if they have a highly entrepreneurial attitude.

Practical implications

This study’s findings are beneficial in understanding the concept of an entrepreneurial attitude and its impact on an organization. For firms to concurrently promote entrepreneurial characteristics and employee commitment, policy and staff practices must ensure the appropriate level of work engagement.

Originality/value

This study proposes new distal antecedent and consequence constructs of the engagement theory related to entrepreneurial attitude orientation and establishes the important link between these constructs with work engagement. The findings originally point to the role of work engagement in maintaining entrepreneurial employees and its effect on organizational commitment.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

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