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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1985

David K. Banner and Alex Himelfarb

One of the most broadly based and prolific literatures in the social sciences has been in the work and/or leisure area. Since the 1930s, researchers and theorists, based…

Abstract

One of the most broadly based and prolific literatures in the social sciences has been in the work and/or leisure area. Since the 1930s, researchers and theorists, based mainly in Western Europe and North America, have generated impressive amounts of empirical research and theories about the relationships have appeared regularly from this literature:

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

David K. Banner and Alex Himelfarb

By reorienting the study of work and leisure to a more sensitised approach, wherein “common‐sense” understandings of actors may be the grounding for scientific…

Abstract

By reorienting the study of work and leisure to a more sensitised approach, wherein “common‐sense” understandings of actors may be the grounding for scientific understanding, it may be possible to discover how these actors construct, modify and change their meanings regarding work and leisure. The categories which fall between work and leisure may be crucial and examination of these may determine conditions under which work has spillover, compensatory relationship, or no relationship to leisure.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

David K. Banner and Helen LaVan

There are no significant differences between work and job satisfaction, especially among groups using flexitime. Additional research is still needed to identify variables…

Abstract

There are no significant differences between work and job satisfaction, especially among groups using flexitime. Additional research is still needed to identify variables which do impact on the workleisure relationship. A sample of 138 managerial and professional employees from a range of organisations, administered with a questionnaire containing demographic data, a leisure satisfaction scale, work satisfaction scale, imbedded scales on role conflict, ambiguity and organisational commitment, showed conflicting findings on the workleisure relationship

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

David Elsweiler, Max L. Wilson and Brian Kirkegaard Lunn

Originally grounded in library and information science, the majority of information behaviour and information-seeking theories focus on task-based scenarios where users…

Abstract

Originally grounded in library and information science, the majority of information behaviour and information-seeking theories focus on task-based scenarios where users try to resolve information needs. While other theories exist, such as how people unexpectedly encounter information, for example, they are typically related back to tasks, motivated by work or personal goals. This chapter, however, focuses on casual-leisure scenarios that are typically motivated by hedonistic needs rather than information needs, where people engage in searching behaviours for pleasure rather than to find information. This chapter describes two studies on (1) television information behaviour and (2) the casual information behaviours described by users of Twitter. The first study focuses on a specific casual-leisure domain that is familiar to many, while the second indicates that our findings generalise to many other casual-leisure scenarios. The results of these two studies are then used to define an initial model of casual-leisure information behaviour, which highlights the key differences between casual-leisure scenarios and typical information behaviour theory. The chapter concludes by discussing how this new model of casual-leisure information behaviour challenges the way we design information systems, measure their value and consequently evaluate their support for users.

Details

New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

Book part
Publication date: 11 December 2004

Stephen P. Jenkins and Lars Osberg

Abstract

Details

The Economics of Time Use
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-838-4

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Bronwyn Boon

There are signs that leisure is becoming increasingly important in contemporary working lives. This paper seeks to contribute to the career literature by examining how work

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Abstract

Purpose

There are signs that leisure is becoming increasingly important in contemporary working lives. This paper seeks to contribute to the career literature by examining how work and leisure can operate as allies.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data from fieldwork engaging with hotel employees located within the tourist resort of Queenstown, New Zealand are used to explore the positive interdependencies between work and leisure for both the leisure‐orientated employee and the hotels.

Findings

The results suggest that skiing‐orientated employees are able to engage in skiing due to the money and time resources they receive from their hotel employment. At the same time, hotels have access to a seasonal, non‐standard work‐time and leisure competent labour pool as a result of the employees' orientation and participation in skiing.

Originality/value

The results support the existence of a leisure‐orientated career identity that conforms to the contemporary individualistic revision of career. In addition, the results emphasise the significant impact that the employment relationship, industry setting and geographic location have on the leisurework relationship.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

Trevor Tsz-Lok Lee and Xiyue Ma

The purpose of this study is to systematically analyze how homeworkers perceive, interpret and make sense of their situations in relation to work and leisure

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to systematically analyze how homeworkers perceive, interpret and make sense of their situations in relation to work and leisure participation. Thus, this study examines the dynamics by which homeworkers struggle to manage leisure and work in their everyday lives, with a special emphasis on how they interpret and make sense of their leisurework dilemmas.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the framework of a dynamic intersection of identity orientation and border-setting approach, this study analyzes qualitative data from semi-structured interviews with 13 young, home-based teleworkers in Shanghai.

Findings

Unlike the purpose of family-friendly employment policies, homeworkers who had striven for a better leisure life ended up with frustration and disappointment, regardless of their attempts at separate leisurework borders or not. In contrast, the overwhelming work in a homeworking context paradoxically led to a more fulfilling and satisfying life for most who prioritized work over all else in life.

Originality/value

In the cases of home-based work or other flexible work policies that aim to make a better balance of work and life, public attention has been directed merely toward a debate of whether these policies lead to an enhanced quality of leisure life or an intensification of work intrusion. However, understanding the complexity of such emerging phenomenon requires a richer, more nuanced explanation. In this light, this qualitative study of homeworkers’ lived experiences is sociologically relevant for deciphering the relationship between leisure and work in the late-modern society that entails an evolving process of negotiating identities and situational variability.

Details

Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1871-2673

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Jo-Hui Lin, Jehn-Yih Wong and Ching-hua Ho

This paper aims to examine a mediating model of work-to-leisure conflict (WLC) based on the job demand-control-support model (JDCS model) and conflict roles of work and

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine a mediating model of work-to-leisure conflict (WLC) based on the job demand-control-support model (JDCS model) and conflict roles of work and non-work life. This model proposes that work loading, time-off autonomy and support from supervisors and co-workers are related to WLC and leisure satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 457 frontline employees drawn from within the hospitality and tourism industry completed a study questionnaire. All hypothesized relationships were estimated using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results support a theoretical model in which WLC works as a partial mediator between job stress variables and leisure satisfaction. Findings suggest that low workload and flexible time-off contribute to alleviating WLC and facilitating leisure satisfaction and with the addition of high co-worker support, directly benefit employee leisure satisfaction.

Practical implications

Management implications related to job design and work-related social support are discussed.

Originality/value

The current study contributes to the existing knowledge base by testing WLC as a partial mediator between work loading–leisure satisfaction and time-off autonomy–leisure satisfaction relationships. These findings help human resource management managers broaden their understanding of the role of WLC in balancing frontline employees’ life in work and non-work domains.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Hansruedi Müller and Ursula Wyss

The study questions how spreading working hours through the day (night) and week might affect how people use their time and participate in leisure and social activities…

Abstract

The study questions how spreading working hours through the day (night) and week might affect how people use their time and participate in leisure and social activities. We make use of closed two‐daystime‐use‐diaries and questionnaires asked employees of the Swiss railway (sample size of 1,400 diarydays), to access the implications of atypical forms of working hours on the workers’ leisure time as well as the time arrangements of the employees’ partners and children. The empirical investigation revealed that people who work shifts are less likely to live in households made up of several persons (an average of 13.6 per cent compared, with 18.8 per cent among people who do not work shifts). Shift workers who live together with others in a household are more likely to share a household with a partner who also works shifts: 30.6 per cent of partners/spouses also work shifts, compared with 14.4 per cent of partners/spouses of non‐shift workers. Subdividing households according to single‐ or multiple‐person households shows that shift workers achieve a slightly longer period of social time than non‐shift workers. On the one hand, this points to a social environment which adapts to the irregular and asynchronous working hours of the person concerned. On the other hand, comparison with sociological theory literature and other time‐budget studies brings out that the social framework conditions and the extent to which working hours can be planned exert a definite influence on a functioning social environment. The Swiss Federal Railways (SBB) tries – and manages – to take this into account, as the survey results clearly show. Thus, it is not possible to draw the conclusion that shift workers are in principle at greater risk from social isolation. In fact, it should be pointed out that the negative consequences of asynchronous working hours can be compensated for by individual adjustments. However, in this regard, certain operational and social framework conditions are a prerequisite for the success of these individual efforts.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 62 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Gerard Stockhausen

In the thought of John Paul II, an accurate understanding of the human person includes the relationship of economic life to full human life. Just as human work is…

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Abstract

In the thought of John Paul II, an accurate understanding of the human person includes the relationship of economic life to full human life. Just as human work is essential to human life lived in imitation of God, so is rest and leisure. Lacking a clear sense of leisure, human beings try to reach their fulfillment by increasing their possessions. As a result they give complete priority to the economic order, making it an end in itself rather than a means to the common good. They get caught up in consumerism, thinking that material possessions will bring them happiness, and thereby become willing to accept the destruction of God’s gift of creation, if only they can have more material things. This essay explores the connections between work, leisure, consumerism, and the environment primarily in Centesimus Annus (1991), Laborem Exercens (1981) and Sollicitudo Rei Socialis (1987).

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 25 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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