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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Heike Schütter and Sabine Boerner

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perception of the workfamily interface in an expatriation context. Furthermore, potential antecedents of workfamily

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perception of the workfamily interface in an expatriation context. Furthermore, potential antecedents of workfamily enrichment and workfamily conflict in the work as well as in the family domain are identified and potential gender differences in perceptions sought.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory approach was adopted. The authors conducted in‐depth interviews with 15 expatriates and repatriates that were analysed using content analysis.

Findings

Work‐to‐family conflict was perceived as a time‐based conflict, whereas family‐to‐work conflict was perceived as an energy‐based conflict. Workfamily enrichment (i.e. work‐to‐family; family‐to‐work) was perceived as a transfer of skills and mood. Furthermore, at least in an expatriation context, the workfamily interface is reflected in more reciprocal influences than are currently presented in existing concepts. In total, four potential antecedents of workfamily interaction were identified: social support at work; development opportunities at work; family social support; and family adjustment. Finally, gender differences in the perception of the workfamily interface could be revealed.

Research limitations/implications

First, the interviews were analysed solely by one person; consequently, inter‐rater‐reliability could not be tested. Second, a direct relationship between each potential antecedent and workfamily interaction can only be hypothesized.

Practical implications

The findings enable companies to implement support strategies that foster a positive interaction between the work and the family domain which, in turn, will enhance expatriation success.

Originality/value

The study provides one of the first exploratory examinations of the perception of the complete workfamily interface in an expatriation context. Furthermore, this is one of the few studies that include female and male international assignees in the sample and therefore can give a balanced perspective of the workfamily interface among male and female assignees.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2020

T. Alexandra Beauregard, Maria Adamson, Aylin Kunter, Lilian Miles and Ian Roper

This article serves as an introduction to six articles featured in a special issue on diversity in the work–life interface. This collection of papers contains research…

Abstract

Purpose

This article serves as an introduction to six articles featured in a special issue on diversity in the work–life interface. This collection of papers contains research that contemplates the work–life interface in different geographic and cultural contexts, that explores the work–life experiences of minority, marginalized and/or underresearched groups of workers and that takes into account diverse arrangements made to fulfill both work and nonwork responsibilities.

Design/methodology/approach

This introductory article first summarizes some of the emerging research in this area, introduces the papers in this special issue and links them to these themes and ends with highlighting the importance of using an intersectional lens in future investigations of the work–life interface.

Findings

These six articles provide empirically based insights, as well as new theoretical considerations for studying the interface between paid work and personal life roles. Compelling new research directions are identified.

Originality/value

Introducing the new articles in this special issue and reviewing recent research in this area brings together the work–life interface scholarship and diversity management studies and points to the necessity for future investigations to take an intersectional and contextualized approach to their subject matter.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Dawn S. Carlson, Joseph G. Grzywacz and K. Michele Kacmar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of schedule flexibility with performance and satisfaction in the work and family domains, and whether these…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of schedule flexibility with performance and satisfaction in the work and family domains, and whether these associations are mediated by the workfamily interface. Possible gender differences in the putative benefits of schedule flexibility are also to be explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 607 full‐time employees in either schedule flexibility or traditional working arrangements the authors tested a moderated‐mediation model. Regression was used to test the mediation of workfamily and the moderation of gender to the schedule flexibility to workfamily path.

Findings

Both work‐to‐family conflict and work‐to‐family enrichment are mediating mechanisms in the relationship of schedule flexibility with outcomes. More specifically, full mediation was found for job satisfaction and family performance for both enrichment and conflict while partial mediation was found for family satisfaction with enrichment only and mediation was not supported for job performance. Finally, gender moderated the schedule flexibility to workfamily conflict relationship such that women benefited more from flexible working arrangements than men.

Originality/value

The paper adds value by examining a mediation mechanism in the schedule flexibility with the outcome relationship of the workfamily interface. It also adds value by including workfamily enrichment which is a key variable but has little research. Finally, it adds value by demonstrating that schedule flexibility plays a stronger role for women than men regarding the workfamily interface.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Charlotte Baker and Sylwia Ciuk

The purpose of this paper is to explore the work-family interface of two non-traditional forms of expatriation. The paper contributes to existing research by comparing and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the work-family interface of two non-traditional forms of expatriation. The paper contributes to existing research by comparing and contrasting the experiences of international business travellers and rotational assignees, pointing out the similarities in their experiences but also showing considerable differences in how the work-family interface plays out in these two groups.

Design/methodology/approach

In line with the exploratory nature of the research, the authors carried out a qualitative case study drawing on interview data with rotators and international business travellers (n=20). In order to get more in-depth insights into the experiences of these two groups of assignees, the authors also used the photo-elicitation technique, which corresponds with the recent recognition that the evolving nature of international assignments requires alternative methods of inquiry to enhance the understanding of the challenges faced by them.

Findings

The study points to four major factors affecting the work-family interface: time spent away, unpredictability of work schedules, limited ability to exercise control over it as well as limited availability of organisational support. The findings illustrate that while these factors impact international business travellers and rotators alike, their intensity varies considerably in the experiences of these two groups.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on a single case study and a small sample which needs to be considered when discussing the implications of the findings. Future research can valuably extend and build on the here reported observations.

Practical implications

A number of practical implications are discussed, notably pertaining to the ways in which organisations can mitigate the challenges encountered by international business travellers and rotators.

Originality/value

The papers focuses on two groups of assignees that are underrepresented in the expatriate literature despite their increasing empirical significance in international business.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Michelle Turner and Anthony Mariani

The purpose of this paper is to explore the work-family experience of projects managers working in the construction industry, and identify how they manage their work-family

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the work-family experience of projects managers working in the construction industry, and identify how they manage their work-family interface.

Design/methodology/approach

Structured interviews were conducted with nine construction project managers working in the commercial sector, and data were subject to thematic analysis.

Findings

Role conditions were found to impact on participants’ work-family interface, identified as working hours, accountability, and the stress arising from accountability. Participants identified four key strategies used to manage their work-family interface: managing work-based stress, having a supportive partner, prioritising non-work time for family, and trading off activities. Despite having to limit time with family and trade off social and leisure activities, participants did not report negative work-to-family spillover. All participants shared a passion for their work. Findings can be explained using the heavy worker investment model, which proposes that job devotion is linked to psychological well-being, decreases in work-family conflict (WFC), and work satisfaction.

Originality/value

Contrary to previous research, findings suggest that construction project managers did not experience inter-role conflict between their work and family domains. It is recommended that further research explore these findings using the heavy work investment (HWI) framework which considers how internal and external predictors shape workers’ behaviour, and whether HWI typologies moderate the experience of WFC.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Noreen Heraty, Michael J. Morley and Jeanette N. Cleveland

The purpose of this brief paper is to introduce the papers in this special issue of Journal of Managerial Psychology, focused on “Complexities and challenges in the work

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this brief paper is to introduce the papers in this special issue of Journal of Managerial Psychology, focused on “Complexities and challenges in the workfamily interface”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first introduces the theme of the special issue, and a brief outline of each paper contained in it is given.

Findings

There is concern that progress in the workfamily research area has been somewhat restricted and may have failed to take sufficient account of the complexity of workfamily issues.

Originality/value

The literature on the workfamily interface is complex, and theory in the field is uncertain and under‐developed. The papers in this special issue should further understanding of the challenges and complexities underscoring the workfamily interface.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Satu Ojala, Jouko Nätti and Timo Anttila

– The authors aim to compare how formal flexibility, such as telework, differs from informal overtime work at home regarding the work-family interface.

2916

Abstract

Purpose

The authors aim to compare how formal flexibility, such as telework, differs from informal overtime work at home regarding the work-family interface.

Design/methodology/approach

By using data from the Finnish Quality of Work Life Surveys from 2003 and 2008, the positive and negative measures concerning the work-family interface are examined through logistic regression analysis.

Findings

Employees doing informal overtime at home are more likely to be affected by negative emotions concerning work disrupting family lives. Additionally, negotiations between couples over the allocation of time become areas of conflict. Only weak evidence is provided for both telework and informal work at home supporting family life.

Research limitations/implications

In studying homeworking, it is important to separate between formal and informal flexibility at work. The data exceptionally enable that. The limitations of the data are cross-sectionality and only a few measures for assessing the positive work-family interface.

Originality/value

The contribution of the study is to show how informal overtime at home is related with stronger negative implications for work-family interface, when separated from telework. The article discusses how well-intentioned working schedule flexibility results in family life being infringed upon. Informal work may help attain a better work-family interface, but, with dual-earner employment being predominant in Finland, informal overtime work can increase pressures on families. The authors encourage the policy- and organisation-level recognition of informal overtime risks.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 34 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Deirdre O'Shea and Melrona Kirrane

The purpose of the paper is to focus on personal and social background factors as potential channels for the transmission of work related attitudes in young adults. The…

2488

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to focus on personal and social background factors as potential channels for the transmission of work related attitudes in young adults. The paper aims to examine the extent to which gender, parental job type, job status, and education, as well as school experience, influence the development of attitudes towards work and family life.

Design/methodology/approach

The study comprised a quantitative (questionnaire based) survey with a sample of 782 final year undergraduate students attending various third level institutions in Ireland and the USA.

Findings

The results indicated that individuals who had grown up in traditional mixed families had more positive attitudes towards balancing work and home roles than did those who had grown up in traditional single earner families. Father's educational level also emerged as a significant factor in the career‐family attitudes of the participants.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this research indicate that young people have developed attitudes towards managing the work/family interface on entering the workforce, which they acquire through a social learning process. Limitations included the cross‐sectional nature of the design and future longitudinal research is needed.

Practical implications

Organizations and managers need to be aware of the well‐developed attitudes of new entrants in order to address early issues of psychological contract and person‐organizational fit, which have an impact on career success and career management.

Originality/value

The findings of the paper break new ground on the role of social learning on the formation of attitudes towards managing the workfamily interface. Such attitudes proceed to inform behavioral patterns and decisions in the harmonious management of the two domains.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Monika Agrawal and Ritika Mahajan

Using conservation of resources (COR) theory the study investigates the interrelationships between optimism, bidirectional work-family conflict, enrichment, and…

Abstract

Purpose

Using conservation of resources (COR) theory the study investigates the interrelationships between optimism, bidirectional work-family conflict, enrichment, and psychological health.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were gathered from 356 Indian police officers using a survey questionnaire and purposive sampling technique.

Findings

The results inform that optimism mitigates family to work conflict (FWC) and fosters work to family enrichment (WFE), family to work enrichment (FEW), and psychological health in the police. The results further suggest optimism influences psychological health via WFE (partial mediation). However, FWC and FEW do not influence mental health.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in a specific culture and context (Rajasthan police), so results cannot be generalized. The study discusses the practical implications for police practitioners.

Originality/value

The study adds to work-family literature by considering personal differences that have received less space in work-family models. To the best of authors' knowledge, none of the previous studies have considered optimism, the work-family interface and psychological health in the police.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Aaron Cohen

The question of how to strike a balance between work and life is attracting increasing attention from both scholars and practitioners. This paper aims to examine the…

1708

Abstract

Purpose

The question of how to strike a balance between work and life is attracting increasing attention from both scholars and practitioners. This paper aims to examine the relationship between individual level values, using Schwartz's basic human values theory, and the workfamily conflict (WFC), the familywork conflict (FWC), and coping strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 122 employees from two Israeli high tech companies participated in this survey. The portrait values questionnaire (PVQ) was used to measure ten basic values. The PVQ includes short verbal portraits of 40 different people, gender matched with the respondent. Workfamily conflict and familywork conflict were measured by the scales developed by Netemeyer et al. Personal coping was measured using the 16 items of Kirchmeyer's scale of coping strategies. Regression and correlation analysis were used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The findings showed a strong relationship between power and the three independent variables. Schwartz's ten values explained a relatively large percentage of the variation in the workfamily conflict and the use of coping strategies.

Originality/value

While there has been a growing trend to examine individual level values in order to better understand the attitudes and behaviors of employees in the workplace, very few studies have examined whether and how individual values are related to the interface between work and family. This paper responded to the call for such research. The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for the continuation of research on individual values in their relationship to the workfamily interface.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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