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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2020

Gary N. Powell

The purpose of this paper is to consider the implications of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic for future research on the intersection of gender, work and family.

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2763

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the implications of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic for future research on the intersection of gender, work and family.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper offers personal reflections on needed research in a post-pandemic future.

Findings

This paper identifies several promising areas for future research on the intersection of gender, work and family.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers numerous recommendations for a post-pandemic research agenda, including future research on essential workers, virtual workers, workers with enhanced family demands, single employed parents, social supports and issues of gender associated with these populations and topics.

Social implications

The paper reinforces the value of social supports at the individual, family, organizational, community and societal levels.

Originality/value

The paper discusses implications for future research of an original event, the COVID-19 pandemic, as it is still transpiring.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 35 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Ronald J. Burke

Posits that workfamily issues have received research attention during the last two decades. Discusses workfamily conflict stating this usually involves lack of job and…

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1714

Abstract

Posits that workfamily issues have received research attention during the last two decades. Discusses workfamily conflict stating this usually involves lack of job and family satisfaction, with more inner‐family conflicts. States a number of companies have shown promise on the workfamily challenge.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 23 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Noreen Heraty, Michael J. Morley and Jeanette N. Cleveland

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a selection of papers within the issue that discuss the workfamily interface.

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2084

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a selection of papers within the issue that discuss the workfamily interface.

Design/methodology/approach

The themes of the papers in the issue are outlined

Findings

The papers address the following: conflict, facilitation and individual coping styles across the work and family domains; generational differences in workfamily conflict and workfamily synergy for Generation X, baby boomers and matures; the development and transmission of work‐related attitudes; a cross cultural comparison of female managers attitudes, experiences and career choices; the impact of individual and organisational characteristics on workfamily conflict and career outcomes, and the variation of work life integration experiences of mid‐career professional women.

Originality/value

The paper introduces the special issue which provides a varied mix of theoretical approaches and multi‐level perspectives to scope out and explain the links between work and family life.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Noreen Heraty, Michael J. Morley and Jeanette N. Cleveland

The purpose of this brief paper is to introduce the papers in this special issue of Journal of Managerial Psychology, focused on “Complexities and challenges in the work

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3800

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this brief paper is to introduce the papers in this special issue of Journal of Managerial Psychology, focused on “Complexities and challenges in the workfamily interface”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first introduces the theme of the special issue, and a brief outline of each paper contained in it is given.

Findings

There is concern that progress in the workfamily research area has been somewhat restricted and may have failed to take sufficient account of the complexity of workfamily issues.

Originality/value

The literature on the workfamily interface is complex, and theory in the field is uncertain and under‐developed. The papers in this special issue should further understanding of the challenges and complexities underscoring the workfamily interface.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

E. Anne Bardoel, Simon A. Moss, Kosmas Smyrnios and Phyllis Tharenou

Are organizations responding to significant changes in Australian labour force demographics by providing more family‐friendly programs? This article explores whether or…

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2043

Abstract

Are organizations responding to significant changes in Australian labour force demographics by providing more family‐friendly programs? This article explores whether or not variations across companies in the implementation of workfamily programs and policies relate to demands of key constituent groups. Findings of the present evaluation indicate that certain employee demographic factors, particularly employees with dependents, women, union members, and long‐serving employees are more likely to predispose an organization to offer workfamily benefits. Employers need to be able to characterise the demographics of their workforce to plan the type of policies and programs that might be most suitable and contribute to productivity outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 20 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Suzan Lewis

Dual‐career families were first identified and discussed by Britishresearchers but subsequent research has been predominantly American.This article first discusses the…

Abstract

Dual‐career families were first identified and discussed by British researchers but subsequent research has been predominantly American. This article first discusses the social context for couples combining careers and family in Britain. It then addresses the questions of whether gender roles within the family, and employers′ expectations are changing with the growth of dual‐career families. It concludes that change is slow to occur and that changes in work and family are interdependent. Implications for further organisational change are briefly discussed.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

L.E. Falkenberg, M.L. Monachello and L.C. Edlund

One of the major challenges for managing human resources in the 1990s is to appropriately respond to employees having to manage the dual responsibilities of home and work

Abstract

One of the major challenges for managing human resources in the 1990s is to appropriately respond to employees having to manage the dual responsibilities of home and work (Paris, 1989). Balancing work and family has been considered a women's issue, with the question being whether women could handle both the home demands and the responsibilities of a paid job. Yet the entrance of women into the workforce has also required major role adjustments by their husbands. According to the traditional model of work, husbands prioritize work over family with the wife providing the necessary emotional and physical support to keep the husband in “good working order” (Pleck, 1977). In today's society, this model is no longer widely applicable, as men in dual earner families receive less emotional support than their single‐earner counterparts (Burke, & Weir, 1976; Keith, & Schafer, 1980) and tend to assume greater family responsibilities (Holahan, & Gilbert, 1979; Weingarten, 1978).

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 10 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2021

Neerja Kashive, Brijesh Sharma and Vandana Tandon Khanna

The recent COVID-19 pandemic has (triggered) lots of interest in work from home (WFH) practices. Many organizations in India are changing their work practices and adopting…

Abstract

Purpose

The recent COVID-19 pandemic has (triggered) lots of interest in work from home (WFH) practices. Many organizations in India are changing their work practices and adopting new models of getting the work done. The purpose of the study to look at the boundary-fit perspective (Ammons (2013) and two factors, namely, individual preferences (boundary control, family identity, work identity and technology stress) and environmental factors (job control, supervisor support and organizational policies). These dimensions are used and considered to create various clusters for employees working from home.

Design/methodology/approach

K-mean clustering was used to do the cluster analysis. Statistical package for social sciences 23 was used to explore different clusters based on a pattern of characteristics unique to that cluster, but each cluster differed from other clusters. Further analysis of variance test was conducted to see how these clusters differ across three chosen outcomes, namely, work-family conflict, boundary management tactics used and positive family-to-work spillover effect. The post hoc test also provided insights on how each cluster differs from others on these outcomes.

Findings

The results indicated four distinct clusters named boundary-fit family guardians, work warriors, boundary-fit fusion lovers and dividers consistent (with previous) research. These clusters also differ across at least two major outcomes like boundary management tactics and positive spillover. The high control cluster profiles like Cluster 3 (boundary-fit fusion lovers) and Cluster 4 (dividers) showed low technostress and higher use of boundary management tactics. Cluster 3 (boundary-fit fusion lovers) and Cluster 1 (boundary-fit family guardians) having high environmental influencers also showed higher positive family-to-work spillover.

Research limitations/implications

Because this study is very specific to the Indian context, a broad generalization requires further exploration in other cultural contexts. The absence of this exploration is one of the limitations of this study. On the culture continuum, countries may vary from being individualistic on one extreme to being collectivistic on the other extreme. Interaction of these two cultural extremities with the individual and the environmental dimension, as espoused in this research, can be examined further in a different cultural setting.

Originality/value

This study has extended the work of Ammons (2013) and added external influencers as a dimension to the individual preferences given by (Kossek 2016), and created the cluster for employees in the Indian context. This study has demonstrated the importance of reduced technostress, and the use of boundary management tactics (temporal and behavioral) leads to positive family-to-work spillover. It has also emphasized the relevance of organization policies and supervisor support for better outcomes in WFH.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2021

Florina Guadalupe Arredondo-Trapero, José Carlos Vázquez-Parra and Ana Sofía González-Arredondo

The aim of this article is to analyze the relationship between the personal life situation and marital status of the worker and how this relates to organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article is to analyze the relationship between the personal life situation and marital status of the worker and how this relates to organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and job flexibility. The study has been carried out with a group of Mexican employees from a commercial company located in the northeast of the México.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is a nonexperimental empirical study using t-test, Levene’s test and Cohen’s test to analyze the significant relationship between the variables under study for 419 employees. The questionnaire was applied only once without a control group against which to compare. The study was carried out in a commercial company located in a city in northeastern Mexico, covering four municipalities in the conurbation area.

Findings

The research reveals that those workers who participated in the study and who have direct family responsibilities show greater OCB and value job flexibility more highly. The tests also found that a flexible working policy is valued by all those with direct family responsibilities, regardless of their marital status. It is also shown that there is a positive relationship between job flexibility and OCB, although not a strong one.

Practical implications

Decent work implies labor policies that support women and men to have an adequate work–life balance. Companies seeking workfamily balance through the implementation of policies such as flexible working arrangements should consider the domestic background of their employees, as this has a direct impact on competitive advantage and is of importance when recruiting and retaining human talent. These findings may also be useful for companies interested in implementing flexible working policies to retain employees with family responsibilities who value the ability to reconcile work and family life.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates the relevance of OCB and job flexibility for employees. If the company wants to enhance OCB, they must consider that personal situation as well as the employee's marital status influences OCB. They should also consider that work flexibility is highly valued by those employees who have children or family dependents.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2021

Quan Lin, Wanchao Guan and Nana Zhang

This study aims to examine the consequences of workfamily conflict and explore the mechanism by which it influences organizational citizenship behavior from the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the consequences of workfamily conflict and explore the mechanism by which it influences organizational citizenship behavior from the perspective of changes in and preservation of family well-being (emotional resources).

Design/methodology/approach

Workfamily conflict has always been an important research topic in the field of organizational behavior; scholars have studied the relationship between it and organizational citizenship behavior from different perspectives. To better understand the mechanism of workfamily conflict on organizational citizenship behavior, we use a longitudinal design and analyze the multi-stage matching data of 209 employees and their superiors from six cities in southern China. The authors construct a theoretical model based on the conservation of resources theory to explore the mechanism by which workfamily conflict influences organizational citizenship behavior when taking employees’ family well-being as a mediator and workfamily segmentation preference as the boundary condition.

Findings

Workfamily conflict has a significant negative effect on family well-being and this effect is moderated by work–home segmentation preferences. Workfamily conflict also has a significant indirect effect on organizational citizenship behavior through family well-being and this indirect effect is enhanced by an increase in the level of preference for work–home segmentation.

Originality/value

This study enriches our knowledge of the moderating variables in the study of workfamily relationships from the perspective of individual personality traits. It also provides a new perspective for the study of such relationships in the context of Chinese family culture.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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