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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

JOHN WHITEHEAD

The ‘Office of the Future’, ‘Office Technology’, ‘Word Processing’, ‘Electronic Mail’, ‘Electronic Communications’, ‘Convergence’, ‘Information Management’. These are all…

Abstract

The ‘Office of the Future’, ‘Office Technology’, ‘Word Processing’, ‘Electronic Mail’, ‘Electronic Communications’, ‘Convergence’, ‘Information Management’. These are all terms included in the current list of buzz words used to describe current activities in the office technology area. Open the pages of almost any journal or periodical today and you will probably find an article or some reference to one or more of the above subjects. Long, detailed and highly technical theses are appearing on new techniques to automate and revolutionize the office environment. Facts and figures are quoted ad nauseam on the high current cost of writing a letter, filing letters, memos, reports and documents, trying to communicate with someone by telephone or other telecommunication means and, most significant of all, the high cost of people undertaking these never‐ending tasks. The high level of investment in factories and plants and the ever‐increasing fight to improve productivity by automating the dull, routine jobs are usually quoted and compared with the extremely low investment in improving and automating the equally tedious routine jobs in the office environment; the investment in the factory is quoted as being ten times greater per employee than in the office. This, however, is changing rapidly and investment on a large scale is already taking place in many areas as present‐day inflation bites hard, forcing many companies and organizations to take a much closer look at their office operations.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1981

John Whitehead

Everyone here tonight must be aware by now that we have entered a new, technological era—in fact, a second industrial revolution. If you are not aware of the new…

Abstract

Everyone here tonight must be aware by now that we have entered a new, technological era—in fact, a second industrial revolution. If you are not aware of the new developments taking place you are either blind, deaf—or, even worse,—either not interested or of the opinion that it does not affect you personally. Either of the latter points can be fatal! Anyone who feels that they are not involved is going to become the Twentieth Century equivalent of the Dodo and anyone who is not interested in new technology is not, in my view, worthy of being called a professional—whatever his profession may be!

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 33 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

John Whitehead

This paper is an appraisal of the current word processing scene as it could apply to librarians and information workers. Some of the problems that are arising due to the…

Abstract

This paper is an appraisal of the current word processing scene as it could apply to librarians and information workers. Some of the problems that are arising due to the introduction or proposed introduction of new technology are described and the concept of evolution rather than revolution is strongly proposed. A description of the systems available and the applications which could be of use to the profession are highlighted. The problems of acquiring equipment and, particularly, the choice some people are having to make between word processors and microcomputers is covered in some detail.

Details

Program, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

Penelope A. Yates‐Mercer and Ailsa A.S. Bracegirdle

Screen‐based word processors have been available all through the 1970s, although widespread interest and use dates from about 1975. Conventional offices, generating and…

Abstract

Screen‐based word processors have been available all through the 1970s, although widespread interest and use dates from about 1975. Conventional offices, generating and manipulating many thousands of words, started to take advantage of the features word processors offer on a much wider scale than they had ever done with their forerunners, the automatic typewriters. Libraries and information departments who were concerned primarily with the already printed and published word were rather slower to realise that they too generated a relatively large number of words in their own right and that these words, in the form of, for example, catalogue cards, accessions lists, abstracts, bibliographies, reports and so on, could perhaps be handled more beneficially by word processors. However, once it began, interest grew rapidly, although actual installation of equipment has been considerably slower—probably a reflection of the limited budgets frequently allocated to such services for the purchase of technological aids.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2016

Jennifer Ball and Muna Kashoob

Most teachers in the Gulf would agree that Arab learners struggle more with reading and writing than listening and speaking. One little considered possible influence on…

Abstract

Most teachers in the Gulf would agree that Arab learners struggle more with reading and writing than listening and speaking. One little considered possible influence on this is the particular visual processing requirements of English. This article suggests why visual processing or visual cognition might be a particular difficulty for Arab students reading English. It offers a simple classroom checklist that may assist teachers to notice if visual processing strain could be effecting their student’s attention, motivation and performance.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Sireesha Jasti

Internet has endorsed a tremendous change with the advancement of the new technologies. The change has made the users of the internet to make comments regarding the…

Abstract

Purpose

Internet has endorsed a tremendous change with the advancement of the new technologies. The change has made the users of the internet to make comments regarding the service or product. The Sentiment classification is the process of analyzing the reviews for helping the user to decide whether to purchase the product or not.

Design/methodology/approach

A rider feedback artificial tree optimization-enabled deep recurrent neural networks (RFATO-enabled deep RNN) is developed for the effective classification of sentiments into various grades. The proposed RFATO algorithm is modeled by integrating the feedback artificial tree (FAT) algorithm in the rider optimization algorithm (ROA), which is used for training the deep RNN classifier for the classification of sentiments in the review data. The pre-processing is performed by the stemming and the stop word removal process for removing the redundancy for smoother processing of the data. The features including the sentiwordnet-based features, a variant of term frequency-inverse document frequency (TF-IDF) features and spam words-based features are extracted from the review data to form the feature vector. Feature fusion is performed based on the entropy of the features that are extracted. The metrics employed for the evaluation in the proposed RFATO algorithm are accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity.

Findings

By using the proposed RFATO algorithm, the evaluation metrics such as accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are maximized when compared to the existing algorithms.

Originality/value

The proposed RFATO algorithm is modeled by integrating the FAT algorithm in the ROA, which is used for training the deep RNN classifier for the classification of sentiments in the review data. The pre-processing is performed by the stemming and the stop word removal process for removing the redundancy for smoother processing of the data. The features including the sentiwordnet-based features, a variant of TF-IDF features and spam words-based features are extracted from the review data to form the feature vector. Feature fusion is performed based on the entropy of the features that are extracted.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Bruce A. Huhmann and Pia A. Albinsson

Rhetorical works (schemes and tropes) can increase advertisement liking. Because liking impacts advertising effectiveness, this study aims to investigate if positive…

3388

Abstract

Purpose

Rhetorical works (schemes and tropes) can increase advertisement liking. Because liking impacts advertising effectiveness, this study aims to investigate if positive processing, brand awareness, and persuasion outcomes previously associated with rhetoric are spurious and chiefly attributable to liking.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment (n=448) employed natural advertising exposure conditions and a 3 (headline: nonfigurative, scheme, trope)×2 (copy length: long, moderate)×2 (involvement: high, low) between‐subjects factorial design.

Findings

Absent of liking differences, schemes and tropes are robust motivators of available resources devoted to processing (elaboration and readership). Favourable arguments only influence brand awareness and persuasion if processed. Consumers negatively view longer copy. Nonfigurative headlines encourage insufficient processing as copy lengthens. Insufficient processing decreases brand awareness and persuasion. However, schemes and tropes overcome negative copy length effects on brand awareness and persuasion regardless of involvement.

Research limitations/implications

Without the benefit of increased liking, schemes interfere with copy point and brand memory similar to other creative attention‐getters – humour and sex appeals. Instead, schemes focus consumers on advertising style. The results are based on consumer responses; thus, error may make differences harder to detect. Another limitation is the focus on a single low‐risk, informational product, i.e. pens. Future research should investigate effects of rhetorical works with high‐risk and transformative products.

Practical implications

Advertisers should use rhetorical works to motivate processing, especially with longer copy explaining advantages of new, technical, or complex products. Also, effective rhetorical works need not create positive affect.

Originality/value

Isolating advertising rhetoric effects from liking differences explains anomalies in the literature (e.g. scheme versus trope superiority).

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 46 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Nael Alqtati, Jonathan A.J. Wilson and Varuna De Silva

This paper aims to equip professionals and researchers in the fields of advertising, branding, public relations, marketing communications, social media analytics and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to equip professionals and researchers in the fields of advertising, branding, public relations, marketing communications, social media analytics and marketing with a simple, effective and dynamic means of evaluating consumer behavioural sentiments and engagement through Arabic language and script, in vivo.

Design/methodology/approach

Using quantitative and qualitative situational linguistic analyses of Classical Arabic, found in Quranic and religious texts scripts; Modern Standard Arabic, which is commonly used in formal Arabic channels; and dialectical Arabic, which varies hugely from one Arabic country to another: this study analyses rich marketing and consumer messages (tweets) – as a basis for developing an Arabic language social media methodological tool.

Findings

Despite the popularity of Arabic language communication on social media platforms across geographies, currently, comprehensive language processing toolkits for analysing Arabic social media conversations have limitations and require further development. Furthermore, due to its unique morphology, developing text understanding capabilities specific to the Arabic language poses challenges.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates the application and effectiveness of the proposed methodology on a random sample of Twitter data from Arabic-speaking regions. Furthermore, as Arabic is the language of Islam, the study is of particular importance to Islamic and Muslim geographies, markets and marketing.

Social implications

The findings suggest that the proposed methodology has a wider potential beyond the data set and health-care sector analysed, and therefore, can be applied to further markets, social media platforms and consumer segments.

Originality/value

To remedy these gaps, this study presents a new methodology and analytical approach to investigating Arabic language social media conversations, which brings together a multidisciplinary knowledge of technology, data science and marketing communications.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Paul A. Watters

A key problem in money laundering investigations based on open source intelligence gathering is the performance (efficiency and accuracy) of people in the team, where…

Abstract

Purpose

A key problem in money laundering investigations based on open source intelligence gathering is the performance (efficiency and accuracy) of people in the team, where suspects will typically try to conceal incriminating evidence or deliberately deceive investigators to avoid prosecution. If we are able to develop a suitable psychological model of deception for web‐based investigations, it should be possible to develop training programmes to improve investigators' ability to “see beyond” deliberate concealment. The purpose of this paper is to empirically test a model based on non‐linear system identification using a well‐known psychological phenomenon (the Stroop effect), where conflicting colour and text information is presented to subjects which they are instructed to process in a certain way.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses an experimental approach.

Findings

The results indicate that strategies for improving investigator information processing performance can benefit from models that incorporate both linear and non‐linear components.

Originality/value

Although the Stroop effect is well known, no other papers have investigated how it may be used to evaluate and monitor the performance of investigators. The real value of this study will emerge when tools are developed to better train investigators to identify concealment within conflicting input data.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Paul Nieuwenhuysen

The following bibliography focuses mainly on programs which can run on IBM microcomputers and compatibles under the operating system PC DOS/MS DOS, and which can be used…

Abstract

The following bibliography focuses mainly on programs which can run on IBM microcomputers and compatibles under the operating system PC DOS/MS DOS, and which can be used in online information and documentation work. They fall into the following categories:

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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