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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2015

Surinder Tandon

Inter-fibre cohesion is regarded as an important property of assemblies, such as slivers, made of wool or any other fibres, with respect to the processing in carding…

Abstract

Inter-fibre cohesion is regarded as an important property of assemblies, such as slivers, made of wool or any other fibres, with respect to the processing in carding, drawing (gilling) and spinning. In this paper, the results of the multiple regression analyses, and their validation, are presented to show that a strong relationship exists between the sliver cohesion (measured as sliver tenacity and sliver specific energy-to-break in a long-gauge tensile test) and a combination of the standard wool properties, such as bulk, mean fibre length (Barbe), mean fibre diameter and medullation content, used for the objective blend specification of New Zealand wools for marketing and processing.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Xiaoli Li, Qiang Wang, Xuejiao Sun, Xuerong Fan and Xue Han

The purpose of this paper is to derive a new method for the hydrophilic finishing of wool fabric.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to derive a new method for the hydrophilic finishing of wool fabric.

Design/methodology/approach

A new biological catalyst, microbial transglutaminase (mTGase), was used to catalyze the grafting of ε‐poly‐L‐lysine (ε‐PLL) onto the wool fabric.

Findings

The K/S value, SEM morphology and DSC analysis proved that the grafting reaction occurred. The hydrophilic properties of the ε‐PLL‐grafted wool fabrics were studied. The results showed that the grafted ε‐PLL could increase the hydrophilicity, which was demonstrated in terms of the obvious shortening in the wetting time and the process of water absorption and moisture absorption. The grafted wool also achieved better antistatic property.

Research limitations/implications

Future work could be focused on the application of this biological method on other protein fabric which was designed to change the performance.

Originality/value

The biological approach is safe, eco‐friendly and effective relative to the conventional methods.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2020

Adriana Gorea, Fatma Baytar and Eulanda Sanders

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of knit fabric stitch patterns, as indicated by fabric thickness variations, on moisture responsiveness for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of knit fabric stitch patterns, as indicated by fabric thickness variations, on moisture responsiveness for different seamless knitted wool-based fabrics.

Design/methodology/approach

Forty fabrics were created on a Santoni Top-2 circular knitting machine by using combinations of jersey, tuck and float stitches in combinations of wool/Nylon, wool, and spandex yarns. Physical properties of the knit fabrics as well as changes in fabric thickness during dry, wet, after 30 min air-drying and after 60 min air-drying conditions were compared. Repeated measures ANOVA tests and bivariate correlation analysis were conducted.

Findings

The results indicated that changes in moisture conditions had a significant effect on fabric thickness, and these changes differed by stitch pattern groups. Float patterns and tuck/rib patterns showed a continued relaxation of fabric thickness through all conditions, but tuck stitches and rib stitches showed a thickness recovery. Wool swatches, unlike the wool/Nylon swatches, increased their average thickness in after 60 min air-drying condition compared to 30 min air-drying condition.

Originality/value

This research documents the moisture responsive properties for wool based yarns, as emerging natural functional materials for seamless knitting industry, with applications in garments for activewear as well as healthcare.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2020

Hossein Barani and Homa Maleki

Finding blue colorants from natural sources is extremely difficult and, usually, the anthocyanin compounds are used for producing the blue color. This study aims to apply…

Abstract

Purpose

Finding blue colorants from natural sources is extremely difficult and, usually, the anthocyanin compounds are used for producing the blue color. This study aims to apply the Red Cabbage as a natural colorant to obtain different colors on wool yarn, as well as specify the optimum dyeing condition by response surface methodology for obtaining a blue color.

Design/methodology/approach

The effect of dyeing process parameters such as mordant concentration, dyeing time, pH of dyeing bath and dyeing temperature examined in the color characteristics of the dyed wool samples.

Findings

The obtained results indicated that the diverse colors achieve by varying the dyeing process parameters, which is in the range of 26° up to 271°. The non-mordanted dyed wool samples showed a red and red brownish color (Hue angle = 26° up to 70°), and the mordanted dyed wool samples showed a blue and blue-greenish color (Hue angle = 230° up to 271°). The obtained blue color with the optimized dyeing condition presented a considerable good wash and lightfastness.

Originality/value

This study provides a promising application of Red Cabbage as a natural colorant for obtaining different colors by varying the dyeing process parameters such as pH and stannous ion concentrations. The stannous ions yielded a co-pigmentation and presented a blue color on wool fibers, which is extremely difficult to obtain with natural colorant.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

Xiuliang Hou, Li Wei, Xinlong Zhang, Huihui Wu, Qicheng Zhou and Shan-yuan Wang

Catechu liquor, which is deep brown-red in color, was purified with a micro-filtration membrane and the stability of catechu dye to different levels of temperatures and pH…

Abstract

Catechu liquor, which is deep brown-red in color, was purified with a micro-filtration membrane and the stability of catechu dye to different levels of temperatures and pH were investigated in this paper. The effects of the dyeing conditions on color characteristic values and color fastnesses of the dyed wool fabrics were also investigated. The results show that the liquor of catechu dye is stable at pH values of 3-7 and its color changes to a deeper brown-red when its pH value is above 8. The preferable dyeing conditions for wool fabric with refined powder catechu dye are as follows: dyeing temperature of 100±C, pH value of 6.5 for the dye bath and catechu dye of 1-4% (o.w.f).

The dyed wool fabric has good color fastnesses to washing, alkali perspiration and dry rubbing. However, its color fastness rating to wet rubbing is poor, ranging from 2-3. Further research will be needed on this aspect.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Debojyoti Ganguly, Chanchal Mondal and Asim Kumar Roy Choudhury

In recent times, wool- and silk-blended fabrics are popular for creating glamourous products. Silk is blended to wool for creating more lustrous effect and to impart…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent times, wool- and silk-blended fabrics are popular for creating glamourous products. Silk is blended to wool for creating more lustrous effect and to impart strength; on the other hand, wool is responsible for resilience, softness and warmth properties. Chemically both the fibres are protein-based, but the amount of amino acids is different. Due to this, the dye absorption behaviours of the two fibres from the same dye-bath are different. Wool is become darker than the silk fibre, if both the fibres are dyed together in a single bath dyeing process.

Design/methodology/approach

Here the wool fibres are first pre-treated with a commercial synthetic tanning agent (syntan) Mesitol HWS at three different pH values of 2.2, 3.2 and 4.2 and at three different concentrations: 5, 10 and 15 per cent. Then the syntan pre-treated wool fibres are dyed together with silk fibres maintaining the blend ratio as 80:20 by Telon Red MR, Telon Yellow M4GL and Telon Blue MRLW with sodium sulphate at three different concentrations of 10, 20 and 30 per cent.

Findings

The dye absorbency of the syntan-treated wool fibres decreased with increase in syntan concentration, whereas the colour strength of silk fibres increased. The resist effectiveness of wool fibres is increased from 6 to 59 per cent with increase of syntan concentration. So after the dyeing process, the colour strength of syntan-treated wool fibres are almost same with the colour strength of silk fibres. The washing fastness of the samples is improved, and wash fastness behaviour of both wool and silk fibres is almost same.

Originality/value

This paper gives an idea about the one bath dyeing process of wool- and silk-blended fabrics to achieve solid dyeing effect.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

B.A. McGregor and R. Postle

This study has focussed on three main areas. First, an evaluation of the physical attributes of cashmere tops available to commercial spinners; second, the influence of…

Abstract

This study has focussed on three main areas. First, an evaluation of the physical attributes of cashmere tops available to commercial spinners; second, the influence of processing variables on the efficiency of producing cashmere tops from raw Australian cashmere; and third, the influence of design of cashmere ultrafine wool blends on the fibre curvature of tops. Testing the physical attributes of cashmere tops from traditional and new sources of supply, was followed by statistical analyses based on factors of origin, processor and other determinants. The analyses demonstrated important processor effects and also that cashmere from different origins shows commercially important variations in fibre attributes. It was possible to efficiently produce Australian cashmere tops with Hauteur, tenacity, extension, softness and residual guard hairs quality attributes equivalent to those observed in the best cashmere tops. The blending of cashmere with wool resulted in a reduction of the mean fibre curvature of the blend compared with the unblended wool. The present work demonstrated that the fibre curvature properties of blended low crimp ultrafine wool tops were closer to the properties of pure cashmere tops than were tops made from blended standard high crimp ultrafine wool. The attributes of textiles made from the relatively rare Australian low curvature cashmere could enhance the marketability of both Australian cashmere and low curvature wool.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2009

Jie Fan and Wei-dong Yu

The structure of wool fibre is a key point in clarifying its properties and performances. Wool fibre can be separated into cuticle cells, cortical cells and even…

Abstract

The structure of wool fibre is a key point in clarifying its properties and performances. Wool fibre can be separated into cuticle cells, cortical cells and even macrofibrils using formic acid as the medium by ultrasonication. The disintegration process of wool fibre is significantly subjected to many parameters. In order to obtain the maximum ratio of disintegration of wool fibre, the effect of these parameters on the disintegration process is studied. The separated wool fibre components are examined with a scanning electron microscopy and the disintegration rates are calculated from the weight proportion of residual and original wool fibres. The results indicate that wool fibre can be separated into cortical cells and macrofibrils by ultrasonication in formic acid. The broken ratio of wool fibre varies greatly with different conditions of ultrasonic irradiation, such as irradiation time, temperature, output power of a transducer, shape of vessel, position of probe, ratio of wool fibre to formic acid, and state of wool fibre. Additionally, ultrasonic irradiation is an efficient method for the preparation of intact cortical cells with high yield from wool fibre in appropriate conditions.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Sachiko Sukigara, Hiroko Yokura and Masaka Niwa

Investigates the effects of moisture transfer on the compression properties and the volume change of wool, polyester and cotton futon padding by taking a series of creep…

Abstract

Investigates the effects of moisture transfer on the compression properties and the volume change of wool, polyester and cotton futon padding by taking a series of creep measurements under three relative humidities and obtaining master creep curves from these curves at 20°C, 65 per cent RH. Discovers that the compression phenomena for wool, which absorbed the moisture from a drying state, were different from those obtained from desorption. Reveals that crimpy fibre assembly showed more volume change and better recovery than uncrimpy fibre assembly at high water content. Notes that the fibre crimp is also an important parameter for wool fibre assembly at high water content as well as standard condition.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Joanne Nicola Sneddon, Geoffrey N. Soutar and Julie Ann Lee

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potentially conflicting positive and negative ethical aspects of wool apparel and the relative importance of these ethical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potentially conflicting positive and negative ethical aspects of wool apparel and the relative importance of these ethical attributes when consumers in the USA make wool apparel purchase decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage mixed-method approach was used to explore the positive and negative ethical aspects of wool apparel and the relative importance of these ethical attributes in wool apparel purchase decisions. First, focus groups were used to identify ethical attributes that were important to wool apparel consumers in the USA. In the second stage, a conjoint survey was used to estimate the relative importance of the ethical and product attributes that were identified in the focus groups and the trade-offs made within this attribute set.

Findings

Seven themes of ethical issues related to wool apparel consumption emerged during the focus groups: animal welfare, workers’ rights, environmental impact, extrinsic attributes, natural wool, country of origin (COO) and fair trade. In the conjoint analysis respondents identified COO as having the highest relative importance, followed by price, brand, ethical attributes and style. A cluster analysis of survey responses suggested there were two clusters that differed in the importance they attached to ethical labelling issues in wool apparel. The first cluster, did not place a great deal of importance on the ethical labelling issues included in the study, however, the second smaller cluster, ethical issues, specifically the humane treatment of sheep, were considered most important.

Originality/value

The study identified wool apparel attributes that were valued by American consumers. That product attributes were more important than ethical attributes suggests a focus on ethical credentials alone may not be effective in wool marketing. Wool apparel was more likely to be purchased by American consumers if they were made in the USA, reasonably priced, made by an independent brand, from humanely produced wool and in a comfortable style.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000