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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Leon C. Prieto

This article seeks to depict the pivotal role Hugo Munsterberg, the great pioneer in industrial psychology, played in the lives of his students, some of whom were…

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Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to depict the pivotal role Hugo Munsterberg, the great pioneer in industrial psychology, played in the lives of his students, some of whom were feminists regardless of his own chauvinistic opinions. The article aims to examine the contributions made by Mary Calkins, Ethel Puffer, and William Marston, all former students of Munsterberg, who went on to make valuable contributions in psychology, women's issues, the polygraph, and the creation of the first and most famous comic book super heroine.

Design/methodology/approach

Synthesizing articles from history journals, writings about the figures of interest, published works by the figures themselves and other resources, this paper illustrates how Hugo Munsterberg impacted the scholarly careers of Calkins, Puffer, and Marston who all made valuable contributions to academia and popular culture.

Findings

This paper concludes that Munsterberg's influence was evident in the works of Calkins, Puffer, and Marston in areas as diverse as the psychology of beauty to the detection of deception. Despite his own chauvinistic views Munsterberg had an amicable and productive relationship with the aforementioned students, which sometimes extended beyond a professional relationship. Consequently, they initiated a research agenda that was greatly influenced by Dr Munsterberg.

Originality/value

This article highlights Dr Hugo Munsterberg's influence on Calkins, Puffer, and Marston, who made valuable contributions in women's issues, as well as the development of DISC theory, and the super‐heroine Wonder Woman.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Kathy L. Kaplan

Highlights the main features of qualitative research conducted with32 successful women consultants in organization development. The formatis multifaceted, including…

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1180

Abstract

Highlights the main features of qualitative research conducted with 32 successful women consultants in organization development. The format is multifaceted, including tables, poems, and text, to reflect the commitment to the deep feminine in the research process and results. Part One discusses the conceptualization of the study, grounded in the women′s voices perspective and four research questions, the findings and a case example. In‐depth interviews explored the women′s responses to the changes they experienced, the challenges they encountered, the contributions they made, and the lessons they learned over the past 15 to 20 years as second‐generation women OD consultants. The data analysis revealed four overarching themes contained in the distillation of the study: women doing the work of consulting as part of their inner journey in the context of oppression, helped and hindered with their relationships with both men and women. Part Two examines implications in terms of two voices in OD, problems with women′s invisibility, a fuller understanding of authenticity, and healing for women and the field.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2018

Andrew F. Herrmann

The purpose of this paper is to examine the rituals and communicative practices that simultaneously create community, out-groups and perceptions of stigma at a local comic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the rituals and communicative practices that simultaneously create community, out-groups and perceptions of stigma at a local comic book retail organization through autoethnography. As such this piece explores personal identity, comic book culture and how this comic book shop acts as important third place as defined by Oldenburg.

Design/methodology/approach

Autoethnography allows for the simultaneous research into self, organizations and culture. As a layered account, this autoethnography uses narrative vignettes to examine a local comic book retail organization from the first person perspective of a collector, a cultural participant and geek insider.

Findings

The term geek, once brandished as an insult to stigmatize, is now a sense of personal and cultural pride among members. Various rituals including the “white whale” moment and the specialized argot use help maintain community in the comic book shop creating a third place as categorized by Oldenburg. However, these shared communication practices and shared meanings reinforce the hegemonic masculinity of the store, leading the author to wonder if it can maintain its viability going forward.

Originality/value

This autoethnography was performed at a local comic book shop, connecting communicative and ritual practices to organizational culture, hegemonic masculinity, geek culture and personal identity. It also argues that one need not be an embedded organizational insider to perform organizational autoethnography.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Scott M. Waring, Carol LaVallee and Tammara Purdin

The purpose of this paper is to outline the SOURCES framework for teaching with primary sources and document why it is imperative that students utilize a variety of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the SOURCES framework for teaching with primary sources and document why it is imperative that students utilize a variety of sources, as they become aware of the power of history and become more proficient at discussing, expressing, and persuasively defending opinions about various issues and topics from history. The focus of the inquiry investigations outlined is on the agentic power of women throughout the American history.

Design/methodology/approach

To initiate and cultivate historical thinking practices and working with primary sources with students at various levels of expertise, it is important to properly scaffold the learning process and allow opportunities for students to successfully build historical thinking skills. The lessons shared will demonstrate how teachers can enable students to interact with children’s literature, other resources, and to examine primary and secondary sources to think critically and historically.

Findings

Through the use of the SOURCES Framework, students are given the opportunity to learn about historical agents in an authentic manner and can find ways to serve as their own agents of change.

Social implications

Students need to understand that civic participation is a necessity of our American democracy and that women from the past and today have been and are continuing to encourage the legacy of civic participation. These women deserve to be heard and should be learned about in our social studies classroom today. Framing an inquiry about the agentic powers of women, using the SOURCES Framework, will encourage authentic inquiry, corroboration with different sources before making assertions, and the construction of evidence-based narratives. Ultimately, this will also inspire students to be their own advocates in their world around them and become active members in our greater society.

Originality/value

This is an original piece that documents how students can think historically, utilize sources, and think about their own agentic abilities. The SOURCES Framework has been utilized in a variety of ways and has been tested in grades K-16.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Marie-Cécile Cervellon and Stephen Brown

Abstract

Details

Revolutionary Nostalgia: Retromania, Neo-Burlesque and Consumer Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-343-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Leela Cubillo and Marie Brown

The under‐representation of women in positions of senior management within educational institutions continues to be a matter of some concern, particularly as the teaching…

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10275

Abstract

The under‐representation of women in positions of senior management within educational institutions continues to be a matter of some concern, particularly as the teaching force is largely dominated, nationally and internationally, by women. Studies on gender and leadership have revealed a number of barriers to women seeking educational leadership and management positions. This paper is based on narratives drawn from women aspiring to leadership and management in different educational contexts, from very different parts of the world. The study examines the “glass ceilings” and “glass walls”; that is, horizontal and vertical barriers faced by each of the women within their cultures and environments.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

Robert M. Blackburn

Looks at the historical positioning of housework as unpaid and questions the correctness of this idea. States that there is a fundamental theoretical error in defining…

Abstract

Looks at the historical positioning of housework as unpaid and questions the correctness of this idea. States that there is a fundamental theoretical error in defining housework as unpaid as market concepts are being applied to non‐market work. Continues to distinguish between the two markets considering the features of both, outlining the gender differences and the recent changes in the twentieth century.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 19 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Joe Curnow and Tanner Vea

This paper aims to trace how emotion shapes the sense that is made of politics and how politicization can remake and re-mark emotion, giving it new meaning in context…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to trace how emotion shapes the sense that is made of politics and how politicization can remake and re-mark emotion, giving it new meaning in context. This paper brings together theories of politicization and emotional configurations in learning to interrogate the role emotion plays in the learning of social justice activists.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on sociocultural learning perspectives, the paper traces politicization processes across the youth climate movement (using video-based interaction analysis) and the animal rights movement (using ethnographic interviews and participant observation).

Findings

Emotional configurations significantly impacted activists’ politicization in terms of what was learned conceptually, the kinds of practices – including emotional practices – that were taken up collectively, the epistemologies that framed social justice work, and the identities that were made salient in collective action. In turn, politicization reshaped how social justice activists made sense of emotion in the course of activist practice.

Social implications

This study is valuable for theorizing social justice learning, so social movement facilitators and educators might design spaces where learning about gender, racialization, colonialism and/or human/more-than-human relations can thrive. By attending to emotional configurations, this study can help facilitate a design that supports and sustains learning for justice.

Originality/value

Emotion remains under-theorized and under-analyzed in the learning sciences, despite indications that emotion enables and constrains particular learning opportunities. This paper proposes new ways of understanding emotion and politicization as co-constitutive processes for learning scientists interested in politics and social justice.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 121 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Steven Gerrard

Up until the turn of the millennium, there had been very little positive representation of women and women in action characters in the action film genre. Two notable…

Abstract

Up until the turn of the millennium, there had been very little positive representation of women and women in action characters in the action film genre. Two notable exceptions were Ellen Ripley in the Alien movies and Sarah Connor in the Terminator franchise. Whilst this has certainly changed over the last 20 years, one action/horror/science fiction heroine remains neglected: Project Alice in the six Resident Evil films. Portrayed by Milla Jovovich, and loosely based on the platform game character, Project Alice is strong, driven, motivated and tough. This chapter will, through detailed analysis of character, her physical presence through the clothing she wears, psychogeographical aspects, her use of weapons and narrative arc, clearly demonstrate the importance of Project Alice to the horror genre.

Details

Gender and Contemporary Horror in Film
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-898-7

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Abstract

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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