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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

Elisabeth Al‐Khalifa

In a period of staff shortages, womenteachers are under‐represented in schoolmanagement and experience inequalities ofpay and treatment. Management training andgovernment…

Abstract

In a period of staff shortages, women teachers are under‐represented in school management and experience inequalities of pay and treatment. Management training and government policy on staffing overlooks the possible contribution of women to management despite the considerable evidence available of how women are discriminated against directly and indirectly, preventing access into management. The development of management concepts in education is recent but this has re‐emphasised the masculine associations of school leadership. Lines of action for change have been indicated through past developments but the changed circumstances following the Education Reform Act 1988 have created new difficulties for women despite their potential as effective managers in a changing education climate.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Cara Aitchison, Fiona Jordan and Celia Brackenridge

Previous research has highlighted women’s unequal status in relation to management within a range of service sector industries. Leisure services, however, has remained an…

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4890

Abstract

Previous research has highlighted women’s unequal status in relation to management within a range of service sector industries. Leisure services, however, has remained an under‐researched sector in spite of its growing significance to the economy and its increasing importance as an employer of women. This paper reports selected results from recent research examining gender equity in leisure management. The research, examined gender equity in leisure management and within the professional institute itself. The results demonstrate that women experience both structural and cultural constraints in attempting to secure management careers in leisure but that they remain optimistic about the future. Analysis of the results indicates that this optimism may be misplaced in an industry where women are encouraged to accept large amounts of senior management responsibility for middle management salaries, where routes to promotion remain unclear, and where organisational culture is informed by the dominant “locker room culture” of male sport.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Bob Crew

The impact of video‐based distance learning technology will give women who are currently prevented from studying by time, money or geographical considerations, the chance…

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The impact of video‐based distance learning technology will give women who are currently prevented from studying by time, money or geographical considerations, the chance to undergo further training and progress up the management ladder, an opportunity to reverse the trend that allows management still to be seen as a masculine role. Henley Management College (in conjunction with Brunei University) offers a two‐ to four‐year distance learning MSc, in addition to its full‐time courses, having the aim of training women managers and getting them into positions of seniority. (Article includes a listing of opportunities for women in management education).

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 85 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Hilary Harris

Reviews the literature on the issues confronting femaleinternational managers. Considers first the changing role of management,international selection procedures and…

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Reviews the literature on the issues confronting female international managers. Considers first the changing role of management, international selection procedures and career development issues. Secondly, examines barriers to women in management within home country environments, showing how phenomena such as occupational segregation and perceptual differences can affect women′s opportunities for entry into international assignments. Specific factors operating at international level include host country cultural sanctions and dual career problems. Recent research evidence, however, questions the assumption that women are unsuited to international management by stressing women′s superior interpersonal skills and increased visibility as significant advantages. In addition, a new commitment to resolving dual‐career issues is apparent as a result of an increasing reluctance to move by potential male expatriates. Is the problem, therefore, more a case of home country corporate culture determining access to, and subsequent success in, international assignments for women?

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Women in Management Review, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Sharon Mavin and Patricia Bryans

Business/management schools may be currently using an exclusive approach to the study and development of management; by ignoring gender in this arena they are reinforcing…

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2363

Abstract

Business/management schools may be currently using an exclusive approach to the study and development of management; by ignoring gender in this arena they are reinforcing the notion that women in management are invisible. Previous research suggests that there is a masculine bias in management education, which disadvantages both female and male learners and which may discourage managers from capitalising on gender diversity in the workplace. Discusses experiences of women academics and students in a business/management school and is based on the premise that change in management education will facilitate change in organisations. Therefore, rather than reinforcing the premise that management knowledge contributes to the maginalisation of women in management, argues that business/management schools should move to an inclusive approach, where management incorporates the experience and abilities of both men and women. Concludes by suggesting a number of initiatives to place gender on the agenda in business/management schools.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Sharon Mavin and Patricia Bryans

Discusses universities role in resolving gender problems and of combating “impoverished” learning. Argues that gender should be central to management development and…

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Discusses universities role in resolving gender problems and of combating “impoverished” learning. Argues that gender should be central to management development and education and proposes that gender should be placed high on the agenda to challenge traditional sex role stereotypes in students’ organizations. Proposes that because of problematic areas in educational environment these may not be conducive to women’s development managerially. States that women academics have to get to these management positions to challenge the status quo, but that the movement up the ladder of management responsibility is very difficult. Goes on to highlight the various supporting arguments and discusses these at length. Gives an example in management educationof gender on the agenda and details out the occurrences and effects. Concludes that the initiatives discussed should be taken on board business/management schools should begin to place gender firmly on the agenda‐increasing awareness of gender issues through the process.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Anne Brockbank and Joanne Traves

Women in UK retail management are well represented at therecruitment stage and at middle‐management level, but in spite of theprovision of equal opportunities policies…

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1517

Abstract

Women in UK retail management are well represented at the recruitment stage and at middle‐management level, but in spite of the provision of equal opportunities policies, are not well represented at senior levels (the so‐called “glass ceiling” effect). Reports recent research findings about the experience of female managers in the UK retail industry. Researchers sought to explore possible reasons for women′s under‐representation at senior management levels, including: varying emphasis on commitment; equal opportunities practices; and factors influencing career progression. Questionnaires were distributed to a sample of 34 female managers awaiting promotion to the senior position of store/general manager and data yielded significant results. The majority of female managers in the sample were highly committed and ambitious for promotion; criteria for promotion may not always reflect equal opportunities policies; and results suggest that women are disadvantaged by different career planning, a lack of political awareness and support.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Deirdre Grondin

During the late 1970s and 1980sunprecedented numbers of women managersattempted to reach the top of corporatehierarchies. Evaluation of their progresssuggests that, in

Abstract

During the late 1970s and 1980s unprecedented numbers of women managers attempted to reach the top of corporate hierarchies. Evaluation of their progress suggests that, in spite of the proliferation of programmes and books aimed at women managers, women rarely attain executive level positions. Indeed, currently, there is evidence in the literature to suggest that they are “giving up the fight” and “dropping out of the race”. The research related to this “dropout” syndrome, the implications of this research, and the challenges it presents to management educators are considered.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Su Olsson

Women in management are marginalised by the continuing pervasiveness of heroic masculinism, the traditional and hierarchical form of management, which depicts executives…

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2236

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Women in management are marginalised by the continuing pervasiveness of heroic masculinism, the traditional and hierarchical form of management, which depicts executives as solitary (male) heroes engaged in unending trials of endurance. This theme of leadership as archetype is strengthened through official organisational myths and stories which function as vehicles of communication management to support organisational goals and to provide role models for aspiring executives. Calls have been made for new forms of writing and more women’s voices in women and management scholarship. Paradoxically, storytelling, which currently supports executive male norms, also provides a potential approach for women in management to break through the dominant masculinist appropriation of leadership. This paper examines women managers’ stories of gender within the context of organisational storytelling and heroic masculinism. These transformational narratives provide parallel but distinctive archetypes to heroic masculinity. At the same time, they present parodic inversions of the “slaying of monster” myths of traditional executive culture. These stories which women tell other women, create resilient images of women’s identities in management.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 15 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1995

Ruth Simpson

The MBA as the top management qualification has enjoyed aconsiderable increase in popularity. However, doubts exist about theaccessibility and success of the course for…

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818

Abstract

The MBA as the top management qualification has enjoyed a considerable increase in popularity. However, doubts exist about the accessibility and success of the course for women managers. Describes a research project which aimed to make a comparison of the potential returns of an MBA for men and women. Also aims to explore the barriers which exist for women in the labour market and how far the MBA overcomes these. Based on a sample of 128 male and 55 female students from part‐time courses, looks at management roles, management functions and salary levels. In addition identifies men′s formal and informal networks as a significant barrier. Concludes that the MBA is less successful for women than for men in terms of career advancement and salary levels.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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