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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

Marta L. Magnuson

The purpose of this paper is to understand how electronic grey literature is being incorporated into Women's Studies collections at academic libraries.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how electronic grey literature is being incorporated into Women's Studies collections at academic libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

The electronic grey literature holdings of four American academic libraries at universities with graduate Women's Studies programs were collected and analyzed. This included: databases; digital special collections; web sites; and online course guides that the library had created for Women's Studies courses.

Findings

Women's Studies International and GenderWatch were the two most popular databases, being available at three of the four libraries studied. The most popular web sites were University of Wisconsin – Women's Studies Librarian (www.library.wisc.edu/libraries/WomensStudies/) and WSSLinks: Women and Gender Studies web sites (http://libr.org/wss/wsslinks/index.html). Recommended web sites were overwhelmingly multidisciplinary in nature and covered a variety of topics related to Women's Studies such as business, art, health, music, and philosophy. The digital collections with women's grey literature all dealt with historical topics and were either about a specific group of people or a specific person or place that had a tie to the university where it was housed.

Originality/value

Grey literature is becoming an increasing popular topic in collection development and document preservation. However, there is little research on grey literature created by women. Specific databases and web sites that were found in the collections studied are mentioned so that other libraries may use the information to enhance their own collections.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Sarika Sawant

The purpose of this paper is to examine institutional repositories developed in India and Canada containing documents on women's studies.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine institutional repositories developed in India and Canada containing documents on women's studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology consisted of identification of institutional repositories containing documents on women's studies, development of a tool for evaluation, followed by actual evaluation/content analysis of identified repositories.

Findings

It was found that there were 22 institutional repositories in Canada and three in India containing documents on women's studies. The highest number of documents on women's studies were available in the IR of University of British Columbia, i.e. 9,778. About 56 per cent (14) of the repositories contained community on the women's studies.

Research limitations/implications

Those institutional repositories containing documents on women's studies developed in India and Canada were considered for the study.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies focused on issues on women's studies and repositories.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 29 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2008

Christine Min Wotipka and Francisco O. Ramirez

Starting in the 1960s, university systems around the world began to undergo a variety of drastic changes that would forever alter higher education. The spread of social…

Abstract

Starting in the 1960s, university systems around the world began to undergo a variety of drastic changes that would forever alter higher education. The spread of social movements were fueled by anti-war protests, demands for civil rights, and new forms of economic and political organization (Lipset, 1993). In terms of changes in universities, students demanded greater educational access and equal opportunities. A worldwide logic of inclusiveness increasingly affected national political and educational outcomes, including transformations in multiple dimensions of the status of women in the polity and in the educational system. This chapter focuses on the emergence and expansion of women's studies curricula in universities throughout the world, treating this unexpected development as a further manifestation of the globalization of a logic of inclusiveness.

Details

The Worldwide Transformation of Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1487-4

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Melba Jesudason

Over the last two decades, women's issues such as education, employment, pay equity, sexuality, lifestyle, housing, economics, environmental safety, health, child‐rearing…

Abstract

Over the last two decades, women's issues such as education, employment, pay equity, sexuality, lifestyle, housing, economics, environmental safety, health, child‐rearing practices, reproductive rights, military service, and criminal justice have become a major focus of public policy at every level. There has been equal interest about women of various ethnic backgrounds, women in other countries, and women's writing. There have been burgeoning social and political demands for research, scholarship, and activism on women‐related topics. To meet these demands, universities and colleges started interdisciplinary women's studies programs. Sheila Tobias, a leading scholar in the field of women's studies, defines it this way:

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2012

Hanan Ibrahim

Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Article
Publication date: 6 October 2022

Yonjoo Cho, Jieun You, Yuyeon Choi, Jiyoung Ha, Yoon Hee Kim, Jinsook Kim, Sang Hee Kang, Seunghee Lee, Romee Lee and Terri Kim

The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore how highly educated women respond to career chance events in a Korean context where traditional cultural values and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore how highly educated women respond to career chance events in a Korean context where traditional cultural values and male-dominated organizational culture coexist.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted 50 semi-structured interviews with highly educated women operationalized as women with doctoral degrees in and out of Korea. The authors used a collaborative research process with a team of ten Korean-born researchers who have built consensus on research themes through discussions on the collection and analysis of a large data set, thus reducing the researcher bias issue inherent in qualitative research.

Findings

In an analysis of the interview data collected, the authors report on three themes: before obtaining a doctoral degree, during and after their doctoral study and responses (coping strategies) to chance events in their careers. Highly educated women’s pursuing a doctoral degree was a way to maintain work–life balance in Korea where women are expected to take a primary caregiver role. After obtaining a doctoral degree, participants struggled with limited job opportunities in the male-dominated higher education. Women’s unplanned and unexpected chance events are intertwined with the male-dominated culture in Korea, and career interruptions as such a chance event, whether voluntary or involuntary, happened largely due to family reasons. In this context, highly educated women responded to chance events largely at individual and family levels and articulated the need for support at organizational and government levels.

Research limitations/implications

The study findings confirm the literature that women’s careers are limited by traditional family roles in non-Western countries where strong patriarchal culture is prevalent. Particularly, women’s career interruptions surfaced as a critical chance event that either disrupts or delays their careers largely because of family issues. Future research is called for to identify both individual and contextual factors that influence women’s decisions on voluntary and involuntary career interruptions as their responses to chance events.

Practical implications

Based on highly educated women’s coping strategies largely at individual and family levels, we suggest national human resource development policies put in place not to lose out on the opportunity to develop highly educated women with doctoral degrees as a quality workforce for a nation’s sustainable economic growth. Additionally, organizations need to be aligned with the government policies and programs for the provision of developmental programs for women in the workplace, beginning with highly educated women’s career planning, while creating organizational culture to promote gender equality as a long-term goal.

Originality/value

The participants’ voluntary career breaks helped them care for their children, be involved in their children’s education, reflect on work–life balance after having long hours of work for many years and move forward with personal satisfaction. Voluntary career breaks can be understood as highly educated women’s unique way of responding to chance events.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Cindy Faries

The one component of collection development most difficult for librarians is the evaluation of the collection. Various methods can be employed to evaluate the collection…

Abstract

The one component of collection development most difficult for librarians is the evaluation of the collection. Various methods can be employed to evaluate the collection including statistical analysis, list checking, user opinions, direct observation, and applying standards. All of these methods have strengths and weaknesses, and numerous opinions exist on the value of each method. However, almost all experts agree that libraries need to invest a great deal of time, staff, and budget for any evaluation to be considered valuable. The process becomes even more complex when evaluating interdisciplinary areas such as women's studies. Collection development issues for women's studies has been well covered in the literature, but very little exists on the evaluation of women's studies collections. This article will discuss one method for collection evaluation, the Research Libraries Group (RLG) Conspectus, and outline the process of using the Conspectus to evaluate the women's studies collection at the Pennsylvania State University Libraries. Given the importance of information needs for diversity materials and the number of librarians who select women's studies materials among their many other responsibilities, this information will be valuable for all librarians engaged in interdisciplinary collection development in both public and academic libraries.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Book part
Publication date: 23 October 2003

Heather Hartley

We are in the midst of a broad societal change in which women’s sexual problems are becoming increasingly medicalized, characterized as treatable medical conditions and…

Abstract

We are in the midst of a broad societal change in which women’s sexual problems are becoming increasingly medicalized, characterized as treatable medical conditions and defined and understood as a largely physiologically based disease, called “female sexual dysfunction” (FSD). When a condition is medicalized, a medical framework is used to understand it, and medical interventions are used to treat it. As part of this process, then, over the last several years, researchers and pharmaceutical companies have turned attention to developing medical treatments for FSD. As this medicalization continues to unfold with potentially important impacts, it is crucial that we understand the forces working to shape it.

Details

Gender Perspectives on Health and Medicine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-239-9

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Sarah D. Bair

This article describes a collaborative effort between a teacher educator, an inservice teacher, and a preservice teacher to develop a program for integrating women’s

Abstract

This article describes a collaborative effort between a teacher educator, an inservice teacher, and a preservice teacher to develop a program for integrating women’s history in an eighth-grade early American History course. Using the results of a survey given to social studies teachers within the local district, they designed a program intended to address primary barriers to the integration of women’s history in the curriculum. Teacher-identified barriers included a lack of quality resources and a lack of time as well as a need to conform to district curriculum and state standards and a lack of content knowledge in women’s history among teachers. In addition to a description of the project, the article provides a discussion of lessons learned through the process.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Book part
Publication date: 27 September 2019

Naejin Kwak and Francisco O. Ramirez

Despite the impressive record of advancing toward higher education, women are substantially underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields…

Abstract

Despite the impressive record of advancing toward higher education, women are substantially underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields compared to men. Less is known about the factors that explain gendered patterns of participation in STEM in countries with dissimilar national characteristics and educational systems. To fill this gap in the literature, this study first examines the historical trends of female representation in STEM fields cross-nationally. Then, this paper explores the relationship between women’s and men’s enrollments in STEM with various structural, national characteristics. Recognizing that the relationship may vary by subfields of STEM, the study further investigates the association separately for natural science and for engineering. Using time- and entity-fixed effects panel regression models pooled between 1970 and 2010, the study’s analyses built on earlier studies on gender segregation across fields of study and gender inequality in higher education. The findings suggest that the common assumption of tight, positive linkage between societal development and participation in STEM holds for only men at an aggregate level under the period covered. The authors find a negative association between national economic development and women’s participation in STEM, especially for engineering. On the other hand, they find positive associations between men’s enrollment in STEM as well as women’s enrollment in other fields of study with women’s participation in STEM. Taken together, the results suggest the significance of the diffusion of an inclusive logic in higher educational institutions.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2018
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-416-8

Keywords

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