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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Paul J. Woodfield, Deborah Shepherd and Christine Woods

This paper aims to investigate how family winegrowing businesses can be sustained across generations.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how family winegrowing businesses can be sustained across generations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors engaged a multi-level case study approach. In total, 27 semi-structured interviews were conducted with three winegrowing firms in New Zealand. All family members (both senior and next generation) employed in each business were interviewed alongside non-family employees.

Findings

Three key dimensions – knowledge sharing, entrepreneurial characteristics and leadership attributes – were identified that can support successful successions in family winegrowing businesses.

Originality/value

The authors have generated a theory that enables academicians and practitioners to understand how family winegrowing businesses can be successfully sustained across generations. The authors argue that knowledge is a central feature in family firms where previous research combines knowledge with entrepreneurial orientation or the resources and capabilities of a firm.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 24 October 2018

Mariusz Maciejczak and Jakub Mikiciuk

The purpose of this paper is to identify factors resulting from climate change that could impact the cost-effectiveness and development of viticulture in Poland. Climate…

1739

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify factors resulting from climate change that could impact the cost-effectiveness and development of viticulture in Poland. Climate change is a crucial challenge for the global wine industry. It has the potential to shift the centre of gravity of viticulture from well-developed regions to new ones, including Poland.

Design/methodology/approach

Two main methods of data collection were applied: computer assisted telephone interviewing and computer assisted personal interview. A structured questionnaire was drafted, piloted and sent to farms randomly selected to represent wine producers from different wine regions of Poland. The linear probability model was used to determine the factors influencing cost-effectiveness in viticulture production. Data were calculated by using SAS software.

Findings

Current and future climate change factors could influence the cost-effectiveness and growth of viticulture in Poland. The exploitation of these opportunities will require the development and implementation of new policies and practices at the farm level, which could also promote innovation in the sector. Furthermore, wine growers according to the increased risk of the unfavourable abiotic and biotic production conditions would be forced to undertake the adaptation strategies to limit the risk of lowering the cost-effectiveness.

Originality/value

This study identifies viticulture and winemaking opportunities for new regions such as Poland. The challenges involved in managing this transition are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Coralie Haller, Isabelle Hess-Misslin and Jean-Paul Mereaux

Several studies in management science have called for a better understanding of the experience economy approach to develop wine tourism. Few studies, however, have…

Abstract

Purpose

Several studies in management science have called for a better understanding of the experience economy approach to develop wine tourism. Few studies, however, have analysed experiential dimensions in the context of French wine-growing regions. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the difference between what wine tourism providers consider relevant in their market offer and what customers expect from their wine tourism experience. A new categorisation of wine tourists’ expectations based on Pine and Gilmore’s (1998) four realms model and Quadri-Felliti and Fiore’s model (2012) are developed.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methodology, qualitatively analysing 17 semi-structural interviews with the main wine tourism stakeholders in the Alsace region in north-east France and quantitatively analysing 233 questionnaires on wine tourists’ expectations and behaviours are adopted.

Findings

The study reveals a difference between experiential offers predicated on an educational approach and the explicit expectations of wine tourists (combining aesthetics, conviviality and authenticity, whose central focus is an encounter with the winemaker). Overall, the findings point to a need for greater inclusion of the experiential aspect in the offer designed for wine tourists.

Originality/value

The study identifies a gap between the educational dimension that professionals tend to promote in their offers and the real expectations of wine tourists who express more interest in the aesthetic dimension provided by an attractive visit environment and an enjoyable experience. At the heart of the authentic experience for wine tourists is meeting the winegrower, making authenticity a major factor.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Sharon L. Forbes and Tracy‐Anne De Silva

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the use of formal environmental management systems (EMSs) in wineries. It reports on the implementation of EMSs amongst New Zealand…

1065

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the use of formal environmental management systems (EMSs) in wineries. It reports on the implementation of EMSs amongst New Zealand wineries and explores whether environmental, social, economic and marketing benefits can be gained through the implementation of one or more EMSs.

Design/methodology/approach

Wineries which had implemented the Sustainable Winegrowing New Zealand (SWNZ) programme were surveyed in order to evaluate their environmental performance and the benefits they received from implementing the SWNZ programme and any additional EMSs.

Findings

This study found that New Zealand wineries experienced improved environmental performance when implementing an EMS but disappointingly achieved few social, economic or marketing benefits. Further, almost half of the SWNZ programme wineries surveyed had also implemented additional EMSs, suggesting that wineries find the SWNZ programme is not sufficiently effective in meeting their environmental needs. Supporting this, the findings suggest that wineries with multiple EMSs have better environmental performance than those with a single EMS.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that NZ winegrowers need to make some improvements or additions to their SWNZ programme in order for it to more fully deliver benefits for wineries and reduce the need for implementation of additional EMSs.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to examine the environmental, social, economic and marketing benefits arising from implementation of one or more EMSs in wineries.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

The Deutscher Verband für Schweisstechnik (German Welding Society) made a very judicious and much appreciated choice of venue for its Third International Conference on…

Abstract

The Deutscher Verband für Schweisstechnik (German Welding Society) made a very judicious and much appreciated choice of venue for its Third International Conference on 18–20 February, 1986, on Interconnection Technology in Electronics. Fellbach, less than 10 km from the Schlossplatz in Stuttgart, and whose past profile was shaped almost entirely by winegrowing, has become since the opening in 1976 of the Schwabenlandhalle a town renowned equally for its significance as a conference centre. With the vine‐crowned Kappelberg hill dominating the town and commanding views to the Neckar Valley, Swabian hospitality and friendliness at its best, and a most impressive congress hall with excellent facilities in picturesque snow‐clad surroundings, the ingredients for providing a conference venue conducive to an optimum interchange of technological information were certainly present.

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Terrance Weatherbee and Donna Sears

This paper aims to examine how wineries used history in their marketing communications to overcome the liability of newness in a settled field that valorizes duration and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how wineries used history in their marketing communications to overcome the liability of newness in a settled field that valorizes duration and longevity.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple-case study investigated the treatment of history in marketing by young wineries in a new wine region. Data included interviews, site visits and marketing communications.

Findings

Wineries worked to communicate stakeholder legitimacy and authenticity by constructing organizational histories through bricolage, communicating history in symbolic, material and practice forms.

Research limitations/implications

Young organizations can communicate field legitimacy and projections of organizational and product authenticity through constructed histories. Results may not be generalizable to other jurisdictions as wine marketing is normatively subject to government regulation. The importance of history in marketing communications also varies across sectors.

Practical implications

Young businesses in sectors where tradition, place and longevity are venerated can establish authenticity and legitimacy through the marketization of history by following practices that demonstrate adherence to tradition and making thoughtful choices in the construction of the symbolic and material aspects of their organizations.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that new/young organizations can use bricolage to create their own marketized histories as proxies for age.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

Silvia Novaes Zilber, Daniel Friel and Luis Felipe Machado do Nascimento

The purpose of this paper is to be a teaching case about organic wine in Argentina, in a sustainable perspective, showing the advantages that this country has related to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to be a teaching case about organic wine in Argentina, in a sustainable perspective, showing the advantages that this country has related to others in terms of organic and biodynamic production of wine. It shows also the potential of this kind of production, and its limitations, using for that the case of Bodega Colomé, owned by Donald Hess, a global wine producer.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses case study methodology; this is an adequate approach, as Argentina has some specific characteristics (geography, labor and other conditions) that makes it unique. The information about Bodega Colomé was obtained from secondary data such as academic articles, specialized magazine articles, web sites about wine production, and an interview conducted with the General Manager of Bodega Colomé, Caspar Eugster, in July, 2009.

Findings

Organic and biodynamic wine production are discussed as an alternative to the traditional production in developing countries, specifically in Argentina, where a series of factors – geographic characteristics (altitude), lands and technology used in a sustainability logic, labor conditions, tradition, history, brand and nature characteristics – allow a competitive advantage to develop. Donald Hess, president of Bodega Colomé, bets in the direction of investment maintenance in organic wines, given the favorable conditions cited, adding brand value, but this kind of production is impossible for less expensive wines as producing wines organically is labor intensive.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this case is its uniqueness and its findings cannot be applied to the universe of companies in Argentina, the country studied; but it encourages future research and more investigation about the subject. The main implication of this case is the possibility of generating some discussion about the theme: do the wine producers of developing countries, such as Argentina, Chile and Brazil produce organic wine (added into the company's sustainability actions) for export, or should they dedicate themselves to the production of traditional wines for internal market?

Practical implications

This case study is relevant for groups of students or professionals interested in discussing the strategies of wine production and marketing. The case may also be used by policy formulators of the winegrowing industry.

Originality/value

The organic and biodynamic production of wine is a recent subject and there are few studies about this theme. Mainly, the role of Latin American players is not very clear and this paper contributes to the discussion about the opportunity of organic and biodynamic wine production as a possible source of competitive advantage to Latin American wine producers in the global market.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Daniel J. Flint and Susan L. Golicic

Sustainability is becoming increasingly important in supply chains, particularly in those that function in highly competitive industries. The purpose of this paper is to…

8863

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability is becoming increasingly important in supply chains, particularly in those that function in highly competitive industries. The purpose of this paper is to understand more deeply the role sustainability plays within supply chains based on a qualitative study conducted in the New Zealand wine industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This research followed a grounded theory methodology which used in‐depth interviews with managers from wineries, retailers, and restaurants; observations of operations; and interpretation of field documents/artifacts.

Findings

The findings show that managers within the New Zealand wine supply chains are trying to find ways to leverage sustainability‐related competencies for competitive advantage in what is now a highly competitive industry. Within this context, the emergent theme of searching for advantage through sustainability involves: pursuing and leveraging sustainability; telling a story that involves sustainability; managing supply chain relationships around sustainability; and experimenting with sustainability initiatives.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to the context and participants of the study. As a qualitative inquiry, findings are exploratory. The research implications, however, involve deeper studies into how wine industry firms in other nations and regions of the world are treating sustainability and searching for competitive advantages. Further validation of the models that emerge can be accomplished through future research, which would draw on aggregate data.

Originality/value

The approach and context within which sustainability is explored is unique. By seeking deep insights from managers on the cutting edge of sustainability initiatives, we are able to get close to strategic thinking and explore the impact on distribution relationships.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 39 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 November 2020

Elena Settimini

A vital testimony of human presence landscape is recognised and protected by international, national and local documents as an identity resource and one of the factors…

Abstract

Purpose

A vital testimony of human presence landscape is recognised and protected by international, national and local documents as an identity resource and one of the factors that contribute to the identity building processes (UNESCO, 1994; European Landscape Convention, 2000). The validation of landscape as cultural heritage presents not only new challenges but also opportunities for the heritage sector. In fact, a landscape plays a dual role: as part of the cultural heritage, which has to be preserved for its values, and as a “living” site, where individuals and groups live and work. This implies that the acknowledgement of its cultural significance should not be exclusively determined on the basis of discipline-driven frameworks and benchmarks but should rather be the result of a shared awareness within local communities.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the analysis of the vineyard landscape of Langhe-Roero and Monferrato (Italy), the author discusses how the selection of a World Heritage site driven by “outstanding universal values” risks presenting a top-down approach to heritage processes.

Findings

In this article, the author explores how people living in this cultural landscape articulate their understandings of heritage values, and she addresses issues concerning their participation in decision-making processes, questioning whose values and meanings do the “outstanding universal value” legitimise or not.

Originality/value

What the author argues is that the World Heritage listing's focus on extraordinary values risks constructing heritage around a consensus that privileges only some actors, whose voices and stories enliven the prestige of the wine production of this cultural landscape, omitting other values, memories and practices from the identity and meaning making processes. Does the identification and representation processes validated through World Heritage status capture how a landscape is understood by individuals and groups living within it? If not, how do these differences affect people's engagement? A further point of discussion is whether individuals and groups want to be engaged in decision-making processes and on which terms.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 December 2020

George S. Day and Karissa Kruse

When the Covid-19 pandemic struck some organizations were more vigilant and better prepared to absorb the shock and are emerging stronger. This article describes the best…

Abstract

Purpose

When the Covid-19 pandemic struck some organizations were more vigilant and better prepared to absorb the shock and are emerging stronger. This article describes the best practices of these vigilant organizations that enabled them to be more adept at anticipating whatever surprises are coming next.

Design/methodology/approach

The article describes the four ways that vigilant firms are distinguished from their under-performing vulnerable rivals.

Findings

Vigilant firms practice: A strong commitment to processes that promote vigilance. 10;9;They invest in foresight activities. They deploy flexible and adaptive strategy-making processes. They coordinate and share information across organizational silos.

Practical implications

Vigilance is rewarded when an organization is able to move faster than rivals once the ambiguities shrouding the weak signals of potential threats or nascent opportunities are clarified.

Originality/value

The practices of the vigilant organizations enable them to be more adept at anticipating whatever surprises are coming next, a crucial capability in the current and post-covid era.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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