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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Ilenia Bregoli, Martin Hingley, Giacomo Del Chiappa and Valeria Sodano

The aim of this article is to analyse how wine and tourism operators understand the concept of a wine route, to determine the impact that definition can have on the extent…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article is to analyse how wine and tourism operators understand the concept of a wine route, to determine the impact that definition can have on the extent to which stakeholders working within distinct, but related sectors (namely wine production, tourism, food and hospitality) collaborate with each other and share knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

By adopting the theoretical lens of “boundary objects” (understood as tangible or intangible entities that allow the sharing of meaning to different groups and facilitate collaboration), this article uses a qualitative approach, based on semi-structured interviews of 20 informants working in three different wine routes in Italy. Analysis of data is carried out to highlight the similarities and differences between the wine and tourism (including identified associated service) industries.

Findings

Wine routes can be considered boundary objects that, if clearly defined by local stakeholders, can facilitate knowledge sharing and collaboration. Problems in collaboration could be explained by an initial mis-definition by stakeholders of what a wine route and its remit are.

Research limitations/implications

As the theoretical lens of “boundary objects” was applied for the first time to wine routes and tourism, further research is necessary to validate its application.

Practical implications

It is suggested that managers of wine routes involve all stakeholders in discussions to achieve a common understanding on what a wine route is, and its role in the promotion of “place” (geographical context of the wine route). Only if this is done successfully, is it possible to achieve collaboration.

Originality/value

This article uses the concept of “boundary objects” (a concept traditionally applied to the study of innovation) to the analysis of wine routes and provides further theoretical and managerial insights concerning networking between wine and tourism sectors, taking a supply-side perspective.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2022

Diana Cunha, Elisabeth Kastenholz and Carla Silva

This paper focuses on the wine tourist market in the central region of Portugal, and it aims to analyze the wine tourist’s demographic and travel behavior and preferences…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper focuses on the wine tourist market in the central region of Portugal, and it aims to analyze the wine tourist’s demographic and travel behavior and preferences profile, based on their level of wine involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents results from an exploratory study with a quantitative design, including a total of 1,029 survey responses from visitors of three wine routes. A K-mean cluster analysis was carried out, and the emerging groups of wine tourists were statistically compared (ANOVA or Chi-squared test).

Findings

Participants present a demographic profile of the wine route visitor similar to that found in other studies, with an average involvement with wine. There were three clusters of wine tourists, with different levels of involvement with wine: less wine-involved; medium wine-involved; and highly wine-involved. Significant differences between the three mentioned categories are visible for gender, age and attractions visited and expenses, suggesting the possibility of a differentiated market approach. Additionally, most respondents report high interest in a variety of attractions that are not exclusively wine-related. This finding supports the conceptualization of (particularly rural) wine tourism as “terroir tourism.”

Research limitations/implications

The pandemic context in which data collection was undertaken led to a smaller sample than expected, which was also more domestic than would have been in “non-COVID” times.

Practical implications

This study provides relevant insights about visitors of wine routes in Central Portugal, which may resonate in other wine tourism destinations. Implications for both theory and practice are also discussed.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills an identified need to study the wine tourism market in the Central Region of Portugal and expands our understanding about wine tourists’ profiles, behavior and interests, adding with empirical findings to the debate on heterogeneity in the wine tourist market, the role of wine involvement and of terroir.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Tomás López‐Guzmán, Juan Rodríguez‐García, Sandra Sánchez‐Cañizares and María José Luján‐García

Wine is a key element in the development and promotion of tourism and it offers the opportunity to generate wealth in a given geographical area. The purpose of this paper…

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Abstract

Purpose

Wine is a key element in the development and promotion of tourism and it offers the opportunity to generate wealth in a given geographical area. The purpose of this paper is to analyse, from the perspective of the offer, how a specific area (namely Jerez in Spain, the Sherry region) is structured in order to develop wine‐based tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology employed for this study consisted of a combination of surveys, interviews and field observations with the suppliers in the traditional wine‐producing region, el Marco de Jerez, or the Sherry region, in the south of Spain.

Findings

The results of the study reflect the level of education of employees, the seasonal nature of tourism, the improvements in its promotion and the need for greater support from local government.

Practical implications

The results suggest that there is scope for developing wine tourism products to attract tourists and which could be used to promote the Sherry region as a centre for wine tourism.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first studies to be carried out an important destination for wine tourism in Spain. This paper also reveals the results of a study on the offer of wine tourism and makes it possible for these results to be compared with those obtained in other areas.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2022

Ana Laura Hernández, Silverio Alarcón and Lino Meraz Ruiz

This paper aims to offer an experiential segmentation based on the analysis of comments from wine tourists from different Mexican wine regions, using netnography as a data…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer an experiential segmentation based on the analysis of comments from wine tourists from different Mexican wine regions, using netnography as a data collection and analysis tool.

Design/methodology/approach

The netnography methodology was applied in three steps: first, collecting consumer opinions (TripAdvisor 1,240 opinions, 2017–2019) from their visits to 20 wineries in four Mexican wine regions. Second, organizing of the data by classifying the various experiences. Third, by the application of multiple correspondence and cluster analysis to consolidate four segments taking as reference the 4Es Model.

Findings

The results show that of the four Mexican wine regions, Baja California is divided between the aesthetic and wine focus segments, Coahuila is more associated to the educational segment, while tourist who visit Queretaro tend to relate to the activities of the entertainment segment.

Research limitations/implications

The scarce literature that exists regarding wine tourism in Mexico made certain comparisons and relationships to the results difficult to establish.

Practical implications

The results provide stakeholders (wineries, state tourism departments, wine tourism marketers and wine tourism researchers) a segmentation proposal focused on tourist experiences to improve marketing programs and wine tourism offerings.

Originality/value

The use of netnography as a tool for wine tourism research in Mexico is one that has not been previously explored. In addition, this study considers different Mexican wine regions, which allows for comparisons and relationships between them that can contribute to greater market differentiation.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Liz Sharples

This paper examines the development of Wine Tourism in the country of Chile. In particular it looks at the different approaches that are being adopted by both private and…

Abstract

This paper examines the development of Wine Tourism in the country of Chile. In particular it looks at the different approaches that are being adopted by both private and public organisations in Chile, in order to promote the country to the ‘Wine Tourist’, as both an attractive holiday destination and, as a provider of quality wines. Chile has much to offer the tourist. A unique landscape, a wide range of climates, and an interesting culture and history which together provide a wealth of differing holiday opportunities. Although wine can be a prime motivator for tourists visiting the country, for example, embarking on wine tours with specialist international travel companies, such as Arblaster and Clarke (http://arblaster&clarke.ww‐c.co.uk), wine can also be a secondary activity that can be enjoyed as just part of a holiday. For example, tourists might take an opportunity to ‘sign up’ for a half day tour to a winery provided by a local company or simply ‘drop in’ to a winery in order to taste and possibly buy some wine when travelling through a wine growing area.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2018

Maria Giovanna Brandano, Linda Osti and Manuela Pulina

The purpose of this paper is to assess the “motivation-satisfaction-loyalty” framework. Through a structural equation model (SEM), it is possible to disentangle…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the “motivation-satisfaction-loyalty” framework. Through a structural equation model (SEM), it is possible to disentangle attitudinal and behavioral loyalty as a multifaceted latent variable.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical analysis is based on data collected in wineries located in two important wine destinations: Trentino and South Tyrol (Italy). Notably, the motivation–satisfaction relationship is confirmed, and the SEM has also assessed the importance of winery services in affecting loyalty, expressed in terms of “visit other cellars,” “repeat a wine vacation” and “recommend wine routes.”

Findings

Destination managers should consider the wine-related “relaxation” as the main push motivation, while the interactions experience are important pull motivations to drive wine tourists’ satisfaction. Nevertheless, the findings reveal that more proactive policies are needed to enhance local wines loyalty.

Originality/value

The novelty of this study is to explore loyalty. In this respect, a multifaceted latent variable is expressed as follows: “buy local wines,” “visit other cellars,” “repeat a wine vacation” as behavioral attitudinal stated loyalty and “recommend wine routes” as attitudinal stated loyalty.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Joice Lavandoski, Patrícia Pinto, João Albino Silva and Alfonso Vargas-Sánchez

This study aims to propose that the institutional environment exerts pressure on the behavior of wineries toward wine tourism development (WTD) and the effect of this…

1054

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose that the institutional environment exerts pressure on the behavior of wineries toward wine tourism development (WTD) and the effect of this influence confers legitimacy to the business of wine tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling through partial least squares was applied to estimate and validate a model using data from a quantitative survey in the universe of 62 wineries with a wine tourism component along the Alentejo Wine Route in Portugal. The proposed model is based on institutional theory through an inter-organizational perspective of wineries.

Findings

The results show that WTD coexists with a highly institutionalized environment, exerting distinctive mechanisms of external pressure together with the search for social legitimacy through actions and practices on the part of the involved wineries. However, the relationship between legitimacy and organizational performance in wineries with wine tourism is not validated.

Research limitations/implications

The specific sample of the Alentejo wine companies does not allow the results to be generalized. Future studies should replicate the proposed research model using other geographic areas.

Practical implications

The results are particularly interesting for managers of wineries and should be considered in the decision-making and strategic processes regarding wine tourism.

Originality/value

The use of institutional theory in the wine tourism context is novel and original. This study fills a research gap by conducting an empirical investigation of wine tourism based on institutional theory, which allows the identification of exogenous factors that can influence and impose restrictions on the organizational behavior of winery companies toward wine tourism.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Edith Szivas

The article examines the development of wine tourism in Hungary, with a specific interest in the recent developments. Wine tourism in Hungary is in its infancy, but recent…

Abstract

The article examines the development of wine tourism in Hungary, with a specific interest in the recent developments. Wine tourism in Hungary is in its infancy, but recent years have seen considerable developments. The creation of wine routes and the “1999 — Year of Grastronomy and Wine” initiative are discussed in detail. It is argued that wine tourism can offer considerable benefits both for the wine and the tourism industry for a number of reasons. Firstly, wine tourism might contribute to the dispersal of tourist flows from the established tourist centres. Secondly, it can enhance the image of the destination and thirdly, it can create an awareness of the importance of the quality issues. It is concluded that the next step in promoting and developing wine tourism must go beyond the initial marketing efforts and that appropriate market research and development policies are needed for the long‐term development of a successful wine tourism industry in Hungary.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Martin H. Kunc

The number of wine tourists in Chile is still small even though investment in infrastructure, like cellars and wine routes, has been made in the last five years. A…

2080

Abstract

Purpose

The number of wine tourists in Chile is still small even though investment in infrastructure, like cellars and wine routes, has been made in the last five years. A question is important to be answered at this point: is there a market for wine tourism in Chile, did the industry overestimate its potential? The lack of historical data impedes an evaluation of these questions. The purpose of this paper is to forecast the size of the local wine tourists market in Chile and provide with recommendations to its development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper consists of the application of a diffusion model to forecast development paths for Chilean wine tourism market. The model is populated with information obtained through surveys to those demographic segments identified as more closely involved with wine tourism based in Charters and Ali‐Knight.

Findings

Chilean wine industry has been developing its infrastructure in wine tourism for a number of years, but the number of wine tourists is still very low. Behavioral factors like local consumers' behavior, especially the high level of forgetting (an average wine visitor will perform only one visit to a winery) that reduces the effect of word‐of‐mouth, hinders the development of wine tourists. Wineries should aim to maintain a constant level of awareness among wine tourists in order to obtain repeated visits and encourage word‐of‐mouth as suggested in Dodd.

Research limitations/implications

Forecasting models depend on the variables employed. Consequently the results are affected by the certainty of the values of the variables, as well as their level of exactness. Even though surveys are employed to obtain the values of the variables for the model, there are no historical data to validate the results.

Originality/value

The paper presents a forecasting model to identify the development of wine tourism instead of only reporting actual or past results. Therefore, the paper adopts a forward‐looking perspective for analyzing wine tourism market size differently than previous approaches (see Mitchell and Hall for a review). The model also supports policy recommendations.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Johan Bruwer and Karin Alant

The purpose of this paper is to use the experiential view of consumption to better understand the nature of the motivations of the wine tourist in a congested wine region…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use the experiential view of consumption to better understand the nature of the motivations of the wine tourist in a congested wine region environment. It also aims to determine the impact of travel antecedents such as the perceived characteristics of the wine region, information sources utilised, and previous knowledge of the region and its products on the destination decision‐making process and ultimately the visitation motivations.

Design/methodology/approach

Information is obtained from a random sample of 304 respondents from 12 wineries representing all size groups situated on the Paarl Wine Route (PWR) in South Africa. Data are collected through the use of a self‐administered, highly structured questionnaire, self‐completed by respondents at each of the winery cellar door venues.

Findings

The most important characteristic of the entire winescape is the region's scenic beauty. Other high impact characteristics are the friendly people and their hospitality, overall ambience and the diversity of wine estates. These factors point to hedonic behaviour in a highly social context and primarily a search for enjoyment/pleasure, mainly by first‐time visitors. The dynamic of first‐time and repeat visitation plays a key role in visitors' wine tourism behaviour. The decision to engage in wine tourism is generally impulsive, even spurious, the visit duration short and the motivations guiding the visitors' behaviour predominantly hedonic in nature.

Research limitations/implications

The impact of the natural landscape underlines the premise that an experiential research approach can yield valuable insights and sheds new light on the fact that a memorable experience for a wine tourist does not only evolve inside the winery's cellar door. In the process it exposits what could be unique selling points for marketing differently positioned wine regions.

Originality/value

This study is of value to academic researchers, travel and accommodation providers and wine industry practitioners alike as it highlights important aspects of wine tourism behaviour with regard to the actual (underlying) motivations that drive them to visit cellar doors in a wine region.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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