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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Lawrence S. Lockshin and W. Timothy Rhodus

This research compared wine quality evaluations by wine consumers and wine wholesalers for the same Chardonnay wine at three price levels and four different oak levels…

Abstract

This research compared wine quality evaluations by wine consumers and wine wholesalers for the same Chardonnay wine at three price levels and four different oak levels. Consumers judged wines mainly by price, regardless of the oak level. Wholesale sales people ignored the prices and judged the wines by the oak level. Wholesalers predicted that consumers would respond based on the wholeaslers' quality judgments, and were unable to accurately predict the consumers' responses. Better targeting of consumers and better training of the wholesale representatives is recommended.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 5 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Janeen E. Olsen, Karen J. Thompson and T.K. Clarke

Wine marketers realise that to increase the overall size of the wine consuming population they must make wine more approachable and easier to understand. As it now stands…

Abstract

Wine marketers realise that to increase the overall size of the wine consuming population they must make wine more approachable and easier to understand. As it now stands, many consumers lack confidence in their ability to select a wine for either their own consumption or to share with others. Therefore, understanding the role played by consumer self‐confidence is especially relevant to marketers of wine, and the need to accurately measure the construct is important to scholarly research. Recently, the development of a scale to measure consumer self‐confidence has appeared in the consumer behaviour literature (Bearden, Hardesty and Rose, 2001). This study first adapts this consumer self‐confidence scale for use in wine‐related research. Next, the impact of six distinct dimensions of consumer self‐confidence on three different wine purchase situations is demonstrated. Results show the scale has the potential to inform both researchers and marketers about consumers' self‐confidence related to wine purchases.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Joseph Fattorini

Whilst the phenomenon of the “wine snob” has been recognized for some years, particularly in the public imagination, the active use of wine “snobbery” to promote sales by…

Abstract

Whilst the phenomenon of the “wine snob” has been recognized for some years, particularly in the public imagination, the active use of wine “snobbery” to promote sales by retailers, particularly high street chains, has been avoided. This article discusses an apparent change in this policy, where the branding strategies of the major high street chains have developed the concept of “consumer as professional” in an effort to symbolically include some consumers in the mystique of the wine trade. This has been achieved by encouraging a process of consumer education, involving trade examinations, and using the symbols of wine production to merchandise wine in shops at the fine wine end of the market. The result of this strategy is to create a small but loyal group of highly knowledgeable (invariably affluent) customers, at the expense of excluding other, less knowledgeable, consumer groups who are targeted by less heavily branded shops.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

A.L. Spawton

Who is the wine consumer? Who cares? The wine industry globally isa multibillion dollar industry, yet research into the behaviour of thetypical wine consumer is limited…

Abstract

Who is the wine consumer? Who cares? The wine industry globally is a multibillion dollar industry, yet research into the behaviour of the typical wine consumer is limited. This article is a partial review of the literature and by deduction from current trends endeavours to provide the wine maker with a broad profile of who drinks wine and what they might be drinking in the future.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Irene Tzimitra‐Kalogianni, Afroditi Papadaki‐Klavdianou, Anastasia Alexaki and Efthimia Tsakiridou

Attempts to identify consumer perceptions about wine and wine attributes in Greece. In addition, a brief presentation of the development of wine routes in Greece is…

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Abstract

Attempts to identify consumer perceptions about wine and wine attributes in Greece. In addition, a brief presentation of the development of wine routes in Greece is considered. According to the results, wine emerges as a staple kind of drink in everyday meals, and seems to be more preferable compared to other alcoholic drinks. Furthermore, taste, clarity, appelation of origin, aroma and label are the most important wine attributes expressed by Greek consumers. Taking into account that Greece is one of the most important wine producing countries in the EU, an effective wine promotion policy needs to be organised. In the light of the interdependence between the new activities introduced by regional wine enterprises and the consumer level of information about “typical wines”, further market research could improve wine promotion both in Greek and the European markets.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 101 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

A.L. Spawton

Who is the wine consumer? Who cares? The wine industry globally is a multibillion dollar industry, yet research into the behaviour of the typical wine consumer is limited…

Abstract

Who is the wine consumer? Who cares? The wine industry globally is a multibillion dollar industry, yet research into the behaviour of the typical wine consumer is limited. This article is a partial review of the literature and by deduction from current trends endeavours to provide the wine maker with a broad profile of who drinks wine and what they might be drinking in the future.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Maurício Bonatto Machado de Castilhos, Marília Gonçalves Cattelan, Ana Carolina Conti‐Silva and Vanildo Luiz Del Bianchi

This paper aims to evaluate the consumer acceptance of Bordô and Isabel wines from innovative winemaking in order to increase red wine consumption by consumers to obtain…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the consumer acceptance of Bordô and Isabel wines from innovative winemaking in order to increase red wine consumption by consumers to obtain nutritional benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

All wines were produced by a standard procedure of vinification. Pre‐drying treatment aimed at drying the grapes up to 22°Brix and static pomace wines presented the constant contact between the must and pomace. Sensory acceptance was carried out by 80 consumers who evaluated eight samples (six experimental wines and two commercial wines) concerning the attributes: appearance, aroma, body, flavor and overall acceptance.

Findings

Experimental wines presented higher acceptance when compared to commercial wines and cluster analysis shows the splitting of consumer preferences, highlighting the higher acceptance of traditional Bordô wine and static pomace samples in all sensory attributes. Pre‐drying process enhances the concentration of coloured compounds, to highlight the appearance acceptance of these samples.

Research limitations/implications

Although this paper has limited the consumer acceptance of red table wines, the innovative treatments will be applied in Vitis vinifera red wines.

Practical implications

The wide acceptance of static pomace and pre‐drying wines has promoted further information about innovative winemaking that can be applied in Brazilian and worldwide wineries.

Social implications

The innovative treatments can change sensorial features of wines and therefore influence the choice of consumers as well as enhancing the nutritional benefits of red wines.

Originality/value

The pre‐drying and static pomace winemaking are the novelty of this study and the wide acceptance of the sensory attributes concerning these treatments indicates the potential for application in wineries.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2016

Jennifer Smith Maguire and Dunfu Zhang

Previous research suggests that constructions of legitimacy play a central role in the development of markets, yet little attention has been given to how that legitimacy…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research suggests that constructions of legitimacy play a central role in the development of markets, yet little attention has been given to how that legitimacy is constructed through the material practices of market actors. This paper aims to address this gap via an examination of cultural intermediaries in the fine wine market of Shanghai.

Methodology/approach

An interpretive thematic analysis was carried out on data from 13 semi-structured interviews with fine wine intermediaries based primarily in Shanghai (5 wine writers/educators; 5 sommeliers/retailers; 3 brand representatives).

Findings

The dimensions of the legitimation of wine were examined, identifying three key themes: the legitimacy of intermediaries as experts; the legitimacy of a particular mode of wine consumption; the legitimacy of the intermediaries as exemplars for not-yet-legitimate consumers. These findings suggest that cultural intermediaries’ personal, consuming preferences and practices are significant to the formation of a new market, and that they must negotiate potential tensions between interactions with legitimate, not-yet-legitimate and illegitimate consumers.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations with regard to generalizability are discussed with regard to potential future research.

Social implications

The focus on cultural intermediaries and dimensions of legitimation can be used to examine the case of other emerging markets to anticipate the pathways to institutionalizing new forms of taste and consumption practices.

Originality/value

The paper offers an empirical insight into the market dynamics of distinction in the Shanghai wine market and conceptual insight into the importance of cultural intermediaries as exemplar consumers.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-495-2

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Matthew Barber, Billy Sung, Sean Lee and Isaac Cheah

The consumption of wine is influenced by seemingly contradictory antecedents such as perceived authenticity and novelty. This paper aims to explore the influence novelty…

Abstract

Purpose

The consumption of wine is influenced by seemingly contradictory antecedents such as perceived authenticity and novelty. This paper aims to explore the influence novelty and authenticity have on wine consumption, in the context of the moderating variables of regionality (i.e. single and multi-region wines) and price (low and high). The research attempts to further understand wine consumption by establishing a conceptual model built on existing wine literature.

Design/methodology/approach

To address the hypotheses and research questions, a panel of 658 consumers who regularly purchased wines produced by the Australian wine industry were recruited. These participants completed a self-administered questionnaire containing stimuli to measure perceived authenticity, perceived novelty, perceived quality, attitudes and purchase intent towards a wine manipulated to have a low vs high price level, as well as single vs multi-regional label. To examine these variables, the study conducted a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to confirm the dimensionality of the constructs and structural equation modeling with both path and multi-group analyses to investigate the hypothesised relationships.

Findings

The findings revealed that both authenticity and novelty simultaneously influence perceived quality. Additionally, it was acknowledged that there is no significant difference in wine consumption between single and multi-regional wines; reinforcing current trends of collaboration within the wine industry. Finally, the results also showed that price does moderate wine consumption; revealing ideal prices for wine with particular regional branding strategies.

Originality/value

The current research is the first to show that authenticity and novelty simultaneously and positively influence consumer’s perceived quality of Australian wine. The findings are also the first to show that consumer evaluation of single and multi-origin wines was positive and yielded no significant difference, suggesting that branding wines with multi-origins or multi-region do not change consumers’ perception.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Mehmet Haluk Koksal

The purpose of this study is to segment Lebanese wine customers based on their level of involvement with wine. It also profiles them on the basis of wine drinking…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to segment Lebanese wine customers based on their level of involvement with wine. It also profiles them on the basis of wine drinking motivations, wine attributes and information sources, wine consumption and purchasing behaviour and socio-demographic characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

The data in the study was collected from the main supermarkets, hypermarkets and special liquor outlets as well as upscale restaurants serving alcohol in the Lebanese capital, Beirut, through a structured questionnaire. Out of 700 people approached, only 498 surveys were collected. After splitting consumers into three different segments: high, moderate and low involvement, the study clearly profiles the groups by employing principal component analysis, ANOVA and chi-square analysis.

Findings

After splitting consumers into three different groups based on involvement with wine; high, moderate and low, the study clearly identified the differences between groups regarding wine attributes, information sources, purchasing and consumption and socio-demographic characteristics.

Originality/value

Although there are plenty of studies on the examination of wine consumers in the literature from diverse countries, this is the first study investigating wine consumers based on wine involvement in a Middle Eastern country, Lebanon.

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