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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Sophie Ghvanidze, Natalia Velikova, Tim Dodd and Wilna Oldewage-Theron

Over the last few decades, consumers’ concerns for healthier lifestyles and the environment have become the driving forces for forming food-buying intentions. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the last few decades, consumers’ concerns for healthier lifestyles and the environment have become the driving forces for forming food-buying intentions. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of product attributes regarding nutrition and health benefits of products, the environmental impact of production and social responsibility of producers on consumers’ food and wine choices.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical analysis is based on an online survey conducted in the USA, the UK and Germany, and incorporates a discrete choice experiment with visual shelf simulations.

Findings

Price and nutrition information are much more influential on consumers’ food choices than information about social responsibility of producers or the ecological impact of production. Product attributes emphasizing the ecological impact of production and social responsibility of food producers are specifically valued by consumers with high levels of environmental consciousness and by those concerned about goods production. Consumers who are health conscious regarding their lifestyle and diets derive high utility values from the nutritional information of the product.

Practical implications

The study contributes to an understanding of how to promote healthier food and wine choices and social and environmental responsibility of food and wine producers in various markets.

Originality/value

The study offers a comparison of product attributes concerning ecological, social, nutrition and health benefits of the product; as well the investigation of congruent interrelationships between the consumers’ values and related product attributes in three culturally distinct consumer groups.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Michelle Rasmussen and Larry Lockshin

As Australia embarks on the new millennium, marketers must understand the basis of consumer choice, both domestically and internationally. Generally, brands are becoming…

Abstract

As Australia embarks on the new millennium, marketers must understand the basis of consumer choice, both domestically and internationally. Generally, brands are becoming globalised (Boze and Patton, 1995), but the wine industry provides an interesting example of global branding in the context of a plethora of brand names. In Australia alone, over one thousand wine companies produce over 16,000 wine brands (Spawton, 1998). This array of wine product creates a complex marketplace, which causes consumers great difficulty when making a purchase decision (Greatorex and Mitchell, 1988). To combat this problem, wine companies have been using branding as a means of differentiating their product (Lockshin, 1997). The introduction of geographical indicators (registered names for specific regions of origin) has spurred on the use of regional branding as a branding tool. This research is being conducted to clarify the effect of regional branding on consumer choice behaviour. The results from the qualitative research stage highlighted the fact that a small number of consumers used regional branding as a cue in their choice decision. These consumers generally had higher perceived knowledge of wine, greatly enjoyed purchasing wine and spent a longer time in the wine retail outlet than other consumer groups. A quantitative study will now be conducted to clarify which consumer groups use regional branding as part of the choice process and to determine the importance of a company's brand and price used in consumers' choice process. As wine is not the only product branded by its region of origin, this research will be beneficial to other product categories such as cheese, seafood and olive oil (Belk King, 1997).

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Eli Cohen

Most marketing researchers use rating scales to understand consumer preferences. These have a range of problems, which can be greatly ameliorated by the use of a new…

Abstract

Purpose

Most marketing researchers use rating scales to understand consumer preferences. These have a range of problems, which can be greatly ameliorated by the use of a new technique, best‐worst scaling (BWS). The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the BWS method by an empirical example, which demonstrates the steps to design and analyze a BW study.

Design/methodology/approach

A brief critique of ratings and rankings is presented. Then the basic concept of BWS is described, followed by how to use the BW method to explore how Australian and Israeli consumers choose wine in a retail store. The paper demonstrates the design of the questionnaire as well as the steps to analyze and present the results.

Findings

The BWS approach can be easily implemented for research in wine business especially for multicultural comparisons as it avoids scale confounds. After transformation of the best and worst scores of each respondent for each attribute, the data can be analyzed directly using various statistical methods and can be expressed as choice probabilities.

Research limitations/implications

The advantage of BWS is its ability to compare attributes using B−W and B/W scores. The BW method provides a better discrimination of the attributes analyzed.

Practical implications

The simplicity of the analysis and graphical presentation makes a significant contribution to practitioners as the B−W counts and probabilities of attributes are easy to obtain and understand.

Originality/value

This paper presents BWS method in a form that researchers and practitioners can use and adopt for research and market surveys. The paper presents an empirical example using BWS method to determine the importance of wine cues while consumers are choosing wine in a retail store.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Carla Ferreira, Lina Lourenço-Gomes, Lígia M. Costa Pinto and Ana Patrícia Silva

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the existence and influence of gender effects on wine choice, specifically whether women and men seek the same cues in wine labelling.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the existence and influence of gender effects on wine choice, specifically whether women and men seek the same cues in wine labelling.

Design/methodology/approach

Five focus groups, involving 45 regular wine consumers (22 women and 23 men) from four Portuguese wine regions of origin, were conducted. Sessions included two projective techniques. To gather more information, participants were asked to fill a short questionnaire, relating purchasing and consumption habits, knowledge and socioeconomic characteristics. Qualitative data were transcribed verbatim and content analysis was used.

Findings

Women frequently associate wine to the context of consumption; while men frequently associate wine to convivial and sensorial pleasure. Region of origin and prior knowledge experience seem to be the two main reasons for men to choose a wine; while, women seem to rely more on wine brand and previous experience. Front label information (region of origin, awards and region illustration) seems to be more important for women, while the back label descriptors (grape variety, world heritage site and wine history) are more relevant for men. The typography (font size) and information type were identified as negative aspects of the back label.

Practical implications

Understanding how men and women looking for information on a wine bottle can help marketers communicate with specific market segments. This paper provides insights to design marketing campaigns regarding product customization at the level of label information and design.

Originality/value

The present research contributes to current literature on wine consumer behaviour, exploring behavioural differences, perceptions and motivations by gender. In particular, the relevance of wine cues for choice decision is explored. The evidence of focus groups combined with projective techniques is complemented with data collected through a questionnaire.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Liz Thach, Steve Cuellar, Janeen Olsen and Tom Atkin

The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast wine sales in neighboring franchise law and non‐franchise law states in order to determine impact on wine price…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast wine sales in neighboring franchise law and non‐franchise law states in order to determine impact on wine price, consumer choice, consumer satisfaction, and stakeholder perception.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used qualitative interviews with 14 wineries, distributors, and retailers, statistical analysis of Nielsen Scantrack data, and an online survey of 401 wine consumers in Georgia and Florida, USA.

Findings

Results show statistical proof that Florida offers more wine selection and lower wine prices on matching brands than Georgia. Qualitative interviews indicate wineries, distributors, and retailers perceive differences in wine choice, price, and overall operating costs in these two states. However, there was no statistical difference between a sample of 401 consumers from Georgia and Florida when asked about their satisfaction level with wine choice and pricing within their state.

Research limitations/implications

For practical purposes, the research was limited to only two US states. It would be useful to duplicate this study in other states.

Practical implications

Practical implications include the need for new wineries desiring to enter franchise law states to carefully research regulations and distributors before making a commitment, as well as the social issue of less wine choice and higher prices for consumers in Georgia versus Florida.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study in the USA to focus on the impact of wine franchise laws on consumer choice and wine price. It yields useful information that contributes to the body of knowledge for wine and policy research.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Lara Agnoli, Diego Begalli and Roberta Capitello

This paper aims to offer an in‐depth analysis of Generation Y's choices concerning the consumption of wine and other alcoholic drinks by examining the consumption…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer an in‐depth analysis of Generation Y's choices concerning the consumption of wine and other alcoholic drinks by examining the consumption situations in a traditional wine‐producing country.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applied the multinomial logit model involving a sample of Generation Y alcohol consumers in a city in Northern Italy. Choice sets were constructed using the Bayesian efficient design, and each choice set included four consumption situations: at bars or pubs, at discos, at home and at restaurants or pizzerias.

Findings

Generation Y is aware of the different functions of alcoholic beverages in different consumption situations. Further, the type of company they keep influences their choice of beverage. Wine is the preferred drink in situations or occasions of conviviality or hospitality. However, this result only partly follows the traditional model of wine consumption. Segmentation elements are highlighted by considering gender and age.

Practical implications

The research identifies some advantages of wine over other types of alcoholic beverages and some weaknesses in the strategies of wine companies. Consequently, six marketing topics emerge in order to develop a constructive relationship with Generation Y in Italy.

Originality/value

This paper applies discrete choice models to consumption situations in order to analyse the variety of contexts, components and products compared with Generation Y's preferences. It analyses the role of consumption situations in driving behaviour choices towards alcoholic beverages.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

Ying Yu, Huihui Sun, Steve Goodman, Shangwu Chen and Huiqin Ma

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the purchasing behaviours of two Beijing wine consumer groups and evaluate the influence of different factors on their decision…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the purchasing behaviours of two Beijing wine consumer groups and evaluate the influence of different factors on their decision making process to provide information to better understand the Chinese wine market and assist with market entry and penetration.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire with 27 single choice or scoring questions and a set of 13 best–worst (BW) scaling questions is designed. Typical consumers in supermarkets and university students are invited to answer the questionnaire which uses a mix of nominal and rating scale responses as well as a BW choice experiment.

Findings

The results show that the consumers intend to pay low prices for daily use wines, but high prices for wines for gift purposes. Domestic brands constituted the highest proportion of the purchases, followed by French wines. The consumers are sensitive on price and country of wine origin; awards, medals, and vintage were of low influences in wine purchasing decisions. Typical consumers like supermarkets and boutique wine shops, while university students prefer the internet for on‐line sales. In the BW experiment, tasting the wine previously, the origin of the wine and brand name listed are the most influential factors in purchasing decisions.

Originality/value

The overall picture of wine preference of Beijing consumers is reported for the first time. It provides an understanding of the factors in wine purchasing decision making and their relative importance. The result could better facilitate wine promotion and penetration in this promising and unique market.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Simone Mueller and Cam Rungie

The purpose of this paper is to apply a very simple but powerful analysis of the variance‐covariance matrix of individual best‐worst scores to detect which attributes are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply a very simple but powerful analysis of the variance‐covariance matrix of individual best‐worst scores to detect which attributes are determining utility components and drive distinct consumer segments.

Design/methodology/approach

First an analysis of variance and covariance is used to find attributes which are perceived to have different importance by different consumers and which jointly drive consumer segments. Then we model consumer heterogeneity with Latent Clustering and identify utility dimensions of on‐premise wine purchase behaviour with a principal component analysis.

Findings

Four consumer segments were found on the UK on‐premise market, which differ in the relative strength of five wine choice utility dimensions: ease of trial, new experience, restaurant advice, low risk food matching and cognitive choice. These segments are characterised by sociodemographics as well as wine and dine behaviour variables.

Research limitations/implications

Attributes with high variance signal respondents’ disagreement on their importance and indicate the existence of distinctive consumer segments. Attributes jointly driving those segments can be identified by a high covariance. Principal component analysis condenses a small number of behavioural drivers which allow an effective interpretation and targeting of different consumer segments.

Practical implications

This paper's analysis opens new doors for marketing research to a more insightful interpretation of best‐worst data and attitude scales. This information gives marketing managers powerful advice on which attributes they have to focus in order to target different consumer segments.

Originality/value

This is the first study considering individual differences in BW scores to find post hoc segments based on revealed differences in attribute importance.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Laurence Carsana and Alain Jolibert

The purpose of this research is to understand the effects of expertise and brand schematicity on the perceived importance of choice criteria in the context of purchasing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to understand the effects of expertise and brand schematicity on the perceived importance of choice criteria in the context of purchasing red wine purchase.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via an online survey of 307 French wine consumers. The interaction effects of expertise and brand schematicity on the importance assigned to choice criteria were then investigated.

Findings

First, the results show that commercial brand is more important for brand-schematic consumers (novice and expert) than for brand-aschematic (novice and expert) consumers. Second, to make their choice, brand-schematic consumers place a greater reliance on quality cues than brand-aschematic consumers, whether they are novices or experts. Third, brand-aschematic novice consumers are only interested in two quality cues [Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) label and wine category], but French brand-schematic novice and brand-aschematic expert consumers look for five quality cues (AOC label, wine category, vintage, commercial brand and place of bottling). Fourth, brand-schematic expert consumers take into account all quality cues.

Practical implications

The individual characteristics of consumers, that is, level of expertise and schematicity, influence the importance assigned to the information contained on the label. Care should be taken when designing a wine label, especially when consumers make their purchases in supermarkets and have no opportunity to seek advice. To convince these customers, it is essential that the font and size of the label ensure that the AOC label, wine category, vintage, commercial brand and place of bottling can be easily read. Brand-schematic consumers are interested in many quality cues to make their choice, and therefore, such information should be available in supermarkets (e.g. flyers and posters). Managers should also focus on brand content strategy to influence and hit brand-aschematic consumers.

Originality/value

There has been little research on the effect of brand schematicity on the importance of choice criteria. The interaction of brand schematicity and degree of expertise regarding product category has not been previously studied in relation to wine selection. Brand schematicity may be used as a segmentation criterion by managers in communication campaigns and brand content strategies.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2019

Roberta Capitello, Claudia Bazzani and Diego Begalli

This study aims to focus on consumers’ preferences towards rosé wine and explore whether and how the consumption context may influence consumers’ choices.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on consumers’ preferences towards rosé wine and explore whether and how the consumption context may influence consumers’ choices.

Design/methodology/approach

Using social networks platform, the authors conducted a choice experiment, to evaluate Italian consumers’ preferences for a glass of rosé in two consumption contexts, restaurant and wine bar. Characteristics of the rosé wine also included price, origin and type of wine. The authors applied a latent class analysis to define rosé wine consumers’ segments and incorporated personality traits in the model.

Findings

The results define three rosé wine drinkers’ profiles: “Wine bar visitors”, “The unenthusiastic” and “Restaurant visitors”. Socio-demographic characteristics and personality traits significantly affect consumers’ membership to the different segments. Who prefers to drink a rosé glass at the wine bar is younger, more opened to new experiences and, therefore, more inclined towards more sophisticated choices. Consumers at the restaurants tend to be more extrovert and sensitive to price.

Practical implications

This study offers insight for practitioners of both wine and hospitality industries in the development of strategies for new products market placement and, at the same time, for academics who are interested in the understanding of behavioural reasoning of consumers’ wine purchase choices.

Originality/value

This research investigates the effect of consumption context on individuals’ preference formation for a less familiar wine, such as rosé in Italy. To the authors’ knowledge, no previous studies explored how personality traits may affect consumers’ wine consumption context choices.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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