Search results

1 – 10 of 61
Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Wim J L Elving

Abstract

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Ursa Golob, Natasa Verk, Anne Ellerup-Nielsen, Christa Thomsen, Wim J.L. Elving and Klement Podnar

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the third special issue on corporate social responsibility communication (CSRCom). In this editorial, the authors take the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the third special issue on corporate social responsibility communication (CSRCom). In this editorial, the authors take the opportunity to share the latest knowledge, research and insights on CSRCom as presented at the third International CSR Communication Conference held in Ljubljana 17-19 September 2015.

Design/methodology/approach

Many efforts have been made to map the research field of CSRCom. Two major ontological streams seem to stand out in CSRCom research: functionalism vs constructivism. In this editorial, the authors describe each of them, address the factors which contributed to their implementation within the CSRCom field and provide a rationale for bridging the two approaches.

Findings

The papers selected for the issue demonstrate that recent studies of CSRCom are anchored both in functionalism and constructivism but that the attention towards using CSRCom in organisational processes of collaboration and networking is growing. This growth is aligned to the changes in the wider social environment. In this editorial, the authors are bridging both approaches and relating them to the most recent developments in CSR and CSRCom.

Originality/value

This paper concludes that a growing body of empirical studies contributes to an increased understanding of how both functionalistic and constitutive perspectives are relevant and provide key insights for communication managers. It also accentuates the idea that the ability to expand the understanding of CSRCom from that of a means to an end to one, according to which communication represents an important end/goal in itself, that can play a crucial role in dealing with the growing complexity of CSR processes.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 3 October 2019

Renate Dam, Wim J. L. Elving and Roel van Veen

This chapter explores how various organizations are engaging millennials in the energy transition. In the climate accord from Paris, almost all countries in the world…

Abstract

This chapter explores how various organizations are engaging millennials in the energy transition. In the climate accord from Paris, almost all countries in the world agreed upon reducing greenhouse gasses, so climate change will be limited. In order to do so, we do need to cut down on our use of fossil fuels and we do need to alter our behaviour. In this chapter, we study how organizations are engaging with young people, often referred to as millennials on this subject. Millennials are seen as digital natives, and they grew up with digital communication. Do organizations engage millennials in this energy transition and engage them in a way that millennials do communicate? Our study showed that, with a few exceptions, organizations do not use interactive media and elements that millennials use, and in this, do not engage millennials to join in the energy transition. We give some suggestions on how organizations can engage millennials to a larger extent.

Details

Big Ideas in Public Relations Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-508-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Wim J.L. Elving, Ursa Golob, Klement Podnar, Anne Ellerup - Nielsen and Christa Thomson

This editorial is an introduction to the special issue on CSR Communication attached to the second CSR Communication Conference held in Aarhus (Denmark) in September 2013…

Abstract

Purpose

This editorial is an introduction to the special issue on CSR Communication attached to the second CSR Communication Conference held in Aarhus (Denmark) in September 2013. The purpose of this paper is to critically evaluate the role of CSR communication and the development of theory and practice of CSR Communication in recent years.

Design/methodology/approach

The editorial sets up a research agenda for the future, the premises outlined about the role of CSR communication being based on Habermas’ (1984) idea of instrumental/strategic and communicative action.

Findings

The theoretically based research shows that there are different framings of CSR. In the first framing, the business discourse is trying to institutionalize CSR and sustainability by pursuing CSR purely as a business case. In the second framing, alternative CSR discourses are challenging the business discourse, communication being oriented towards shared understanding.

Originality/value

The above findings are original insofar as they have implications for CSR communication scholars and practitioners. It is, for example, important that they acknowledge that two kinds of framings exist, and that they are interdependent. Hence, they should not fall into the trap of a critical discourse of suspicion where CSR communication is constantly criticized as a tool to serve business interests. In the context of strategic and/or communicative action, CSR communication occurs in different forms and for different purposes – either as informative, persuasive, aspirational and participatory type of CSR communication.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

John M.T. Balmer, Shaun M. Powell and Wim J.L. Elving

Abstract

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Shaun Powell, Wim J.L. Elving, Chris Dodd and Julia Sloan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and measure employees' perception of actual and desired corporate ethical values as a component of corporate identity within a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and measure employees' perception of actual and desired corporate ethical values as a component of corporate identity within a major UK financial institution, against a comparison with their employees' own individual ethical values.

Design/methodology/approach

The multi‐method case study uses a mix of secondary data analysis, key interviews and 245 employee questionnaires. The financial institution is selected as it is identified as being in the process of instigating what may be termed a “monolithic” corporate branding strategy while using a “top down” communication approach across its various operations in the UK.

Findings

The paper shows that employees' perceive managements' ideal identity to be significantly different to the operational reality that “is” the company, especially in relation to ethical values. These gaps also vary between major divisions within the organisation, as well as between differing staffing levels, adding empirical support to existing theories that corporate identity and corporate brand management will need to take into account many sub‐cultures within any large organisation, as well as the individual values of its employees, and that a top down communication programme that fails to take this into consideration will face many difficulties.

Originality/value

This empirical based case study research focuses upon a comparison between internal perceptions of actual and ideal corporate values as part of the corporate identity, in comparison to employees' own individual values has been largely overlooked within the corporate identity and branding literatures to date.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 11 October 2017

Wim J.L. Elving and Rosa May Postma

In this study, the strategies of companies regarding social media and stakeholder dialogue and engagement are central. Based on insights from previous studies, it showed…

Abstract

In this study, the strategies of companies regarding social media and stakeholder dialogue and engagement are central. Based on insights from previous studies, it showed that organizations used little opportunities for stakeholder dialogue on social media. Since dialogue is a condition to create engagement, it is of importance for a follow-up study. Therefore, 10 respondents from leading European companies were interviewed and asked about strategies regarding stakeholder dialogue and related topics. From the results, we can conclude that engaging in dialogue with stakeholders on social media is still underdeveloped. Organizations are not only missing opportunities but also take risk not pursuing the opportunities social media offer.

Details

How Strategic Communication Shapes Value and Innovation in Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-716-4

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Wim J.L. Elving

Abstract

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Abstract

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

1 – 10 of 61