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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 September 2019

Melvin Vooren, Carla Haelermans, Wim Groot and Henriette Maassen van den Brink

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a discrete choice experiment (DCE) on the competencies of potential information technology (IT)-retrainees. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a discrete choice experiment (DCE) on the competencies of potential information technology (IT)-retrainees. The results give insights in the monetary value and relative returns to both soft and hard skills.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply a DCE in which the authors propose seven pairs of hypothetical candidates to employers based in the municipality of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. These hypothetical candidates differ on six observable skill attributes and have different starting wages. The authors use the inference from the DCE to calculate the marginal rates of substitution (MRS). The MRS gives an indication of the monetary value of each skill attribute.

Findings

Employers prefer a candidate who possesses a degree in an exact field over a similar candidate from another discipline. Programming experience from previous jobs is the most highly valued characteristic for an IT-retrainee. Employers would pay a candidate with basic programming experience a 53 percent higher starting wage. The most high-valued soft skill is listening skills, for which employers are willing to pay a 46 percent higher wage. The results of this paper show that both hard and soft skills are important, but not all soft skills are equally important.

Originality/value

The results on the returns to skills provide guidelines to tailor IT training and retraining programs to the needs of the business environment. A key strength of this paper is that the authors have information on the preference orderings for different skills and kinds of experience.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2022

Muhammad Fauzan Ansyari, Wim Groot and Kristof De Witte

Professional development interventions (PDIs) are crucial for equipping teachers to use data effectively. Relying on previous studies reporting on such interventions, this…

Abstract

Purpose

Professional development interventions (PDIs) are crucial for equipping teachers to use data effectively. Relying on previous studies reporting on such interventions, this paper aims to identify and synthesise the goals, dimensions and conditions of PDIs for data use. This paper also examines the evidence of the effect of such interventions on student outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors employ a systematic literature review and meta-analysis to analyse teacher PDIs for data use.

Findings

The results suggest that conceptual, practical and continual goals are identified in data use PDIs. Supported by conceptual, practical or normative tools, facilitators employ a variety of techniques in facilitating teachers’ data use through data teams or professional learning communities. The facilitation techniques include assessing needs, using models or modelling, observing performance, providing feedback, providing built-in time for reflection and brokering. Further, the results highlight the influence of several conditions that contribute to the success of the interventions. Finally, the meta-analysis shows a significant positive effect of the interventions on student outcomes, with an effect size of 0.17.

Research limitations/implications

The authors' proposed framework should be empirically tested and validated through field studies in various contexts. Since the authors focussed on studies reporting data use PDIs for instructional purposes as well as providing the descriptions of the PDIs, the number of included studies was only 27 and represented only four countries. Of the 27, 10 studies were used for the meta-analysis and the results may be subject to publication bias. Seemingly, the result may be related to the authors' inclusion/exclusion criteria that only included peer-reviewed journal articles and excluded non-peer-reviewed studies such as theses or dissertations. This criterion potentially neglected some relevant studies.

Practical implications

Policymakers interested in developing a data use PDI should take into account the various goals of data use PDIs, depending on policymakers' interests. Building teachers’ understanding of data use can be addressed by the practical goals. This can be conducted within a short period of time through training or courses, either in-person or online. This is appropriate for an initiation strategy for data use within schools. However, targeting specific skills and dispositional attributes around data use should adopt practical and continual goals. These types of goals require a PDI with a sustained duration embedded in teachers’ classroom practices; therefore, political and practical support is necessary.

Social implications

The authors argue that the review findings contribute to knowledge and insights by presenting data use PDIs that support teacher learning, implementation and sustainability of data use practices.

Originality/value

This article provides a proposed framework for studying teacher PDIs for data use and sheds light on several goals, a variety of facilitation strategies and conditions and the effect of the interventions on student outcomes.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2019

Nga Le, Wim Groot, Sonila M. Tomini and Florian Tomini

The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of empirical evidence on the labour market effects of health insurance from the supply side.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of empirical evidence on the labour market effects of health insurance from the supply side.

Design/methodology/approach

The study covers the largest peer-reviewed and working paper databases for labour economics and health studies. These include Web of Science, Google Scholar, Pubmed and the most popular economics working paper sources such as NBER, ECONSTOR, IDEAS, IZA, SSRN, World Bank Working Paper Series. The authors follow the PRISMA 2009 protocol for systematic reviews.

Findings

The collection includes 63 studies. The outcomes of interest are the number of hours worked, the probability of employment, self-employment and the level of economic formalisation. The authors find that the current literature is vastly concentrated on the USA. Spousal coverage in the USA is associated with reduced labour supply of secondary earners. The effect of Medicaid in the USA on the labour supply of its recipients is ambiguous. The employment-coverage link is an important determinant of the labour supply of people with health problems and self-employment decisions. Universal coverage may create either an incentive or a disincentive to work depending on the design of the system. Finally, evidence on the relationship between health insurance and the level of economic formalisation in developing countries is fragmented and limited.

Practical implications

This study reviews the existing literature on the labour market effects of health insurance from the supply side. The authors find a large knowledge gap in emerging economies where health coverage is expanding. The authors also highlight important literature gaps that need to be filled in different themes of the topic.

Originality/value

This is the first systematic review on the topic which is becoming increasingly relevant for policy makers in developing countries where health coverage is expanding.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2017

Tetiana Stepurko, Milena Pavlova and Wim Groot

Informal payments in health care exist in many countries around the world. However, the prevalence of informal payments varies between countries. A distinction between…

Abstract

Informal payments in health care exist in many countries around the world. However, the prevalence of informal payments varies between countries. A distinction between illegal or unethical informal payments like bribes and corruption, and legal and ethical forms of informal payment like giving gifts is not always easy to make. Illegal and unethical practices include, for example, buying medical certificates, bid rigging during procurements, or selecting service-providers for a hospital based on personal connections. A conceptual global definition of informal payments in health care is not feasible because informality depends on local regulations, values, and traditions. In this chapter, we provide an up-to-date understanding of informal payments in health care (including corruption, fraud etc.) by distinguishing micro, meso, and macro levels of informal payments. We argue that informal payments that occur at these levels cannot be unified under one umbrella of corruption because the various forms of informal payments in health care differ in nature, scope, and damaging effects.

Details

The Handbook of Business and Corruption
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-445-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Wim Groot and H.M. van den Brink

Over the past years a number of studies have appeared on the incidence and returns to overeducation in the labor market. In these studies various definitions of…

1173

Abstract

Over the past years a number of studies have appeared on the incidence and returns to overeducation in the labor market. In these studies various definitions of educational mismatches have been used. In this paper we analyze the validity and reliability of three of these definitions. It is found that the definitions differ widely in the workers who are identified as over‐ or undereducated. Further, the methods yield different estimates of the returns to over‐ and undereducation.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 21 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Wim Groot and Henriëtte Maassen van den Brink

Using data for The Netherlands, this paper analyzes the relation between allocation, wages and job satisfaction. Five conclusions emerge from the empirical analysis…

18850

Abstract

Using data for The Netherlands, this paper analyzes the relation between allocation, wages and job satisfaction. Five conclusions emerge from the empirical analysis: satisfaction with the job content is the main factor explaining overall job satisfaction; the effects of individual and job characteristics on job satisfaction differ by the aspect of the job considered; the response to a general question on job satisfaction differs from the response to questions on satisfaction with different aspects of the job; it is relevant to consider the joint relation between wages and job satisfaction; and skill mismatches do not seem to affect job satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2017

Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Business and Corruption
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-445-7

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2017

Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Business and Corruption
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-445-7

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 January 2022

Teresa Rebelo, Paulo Renato Lourenço and Isabel Dórdio Dimas

186

Abstract

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2022

Joana Baleeiro Passos, Daisy Valle Enrique, Camila Costa Dutra and Carla Schwengber ten Caten

The innovation process demands an interaction between environment agents, knowledge generators and policies of incentive for innovation and not only development by…

Abstract

Purpose

The innovation process demands an interaction between environment agents, knowledge generators and policies of incentive for innovation and not only development by companies. Universities have gradually become the core of the knowledge production system and, therefore, their role regarding innovation has become more important and diversified. This study is aimed at identifying the mechanisms of university–industry (U–I) collaboration, as well as the operationalization steps of the U–I collaboration process.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is aimed at identifying, based on a systematic literature review, the mechanisms of university–industry (U–I) collaboration, as well as the operationalization steps of the U–I collaboration process.

Findings

The analysis of the 72 selected articles enabled identifying 15 mechanisms of U–I collaboration, proposing a new classification for such mechanisms and developing a framework presenting the operationalization steps of the interaction process.

Originality/value

In this paper, the authors screened nearly 1,500 papers and analyzed in detail 86 papers addressing U–I collaboration, mechanisms of U–I collaboration and operationalization steps of the U–I collaboration process. This paper provides a new classification for such mechanisms and developing a framework presenting the operationalization steps of the interaction process. This research contributes to both theory and practice by highlighting managerial aspects and stimulating academic research on such timely topic.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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