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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Wilson Ng and Richard Thorpe

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature and process of leadership in a mid‐sized, family‐controlled bank in Singapore in order to understand how it grew and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature and process of leadership in a mid‐sized, family‐controlled bank in Singapore in order to understand how it grew and developed under family control.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on distributed leadership as a theoretical framework in exploring how a major corporate acquisition was conceived and undertaken to advance the bank's growth and development. Data were obtained through structured interviews with managers based on a three‐part discussion protocol following a pre‐interview questionnaire.

Findings

An “extended” system of leadership involving different levels of managers is developed that successfully completed the acquisition and produced significant growth from the combined businesses.

Research limitations/implications

Based on a single case, the paper does not claim that the observed phenomena are typical of mid‐sized family‐controlled businesses (FCBs). However, for scholars, the paper suggests how studying leadership practice in such FCBs may produce insights that challenge the popular view of an all‐powerful family leader by substituting a more nuanced perspective of a collaborative leadership system that facilitates entrepreneurial activity down the firm.

Practical implications

For managers, the study suggests how deeply developed collaboration among different levels of managers may produce competitive advantage for FCBs that seek further growth and development.

Social implications

It is suggested how further research of the growth processes of mid‐sized FCBs may maximize the value of entrepreneurial opportunities for their “extended” family of stakeholders, specifically for their customers with whom FCBs typically enjoy close relations.

Originality/value

The paper fills an empirical gap in the literature on competitive, mid‐sized FCBs by articulating a process in which a unique competency is developed for their ongoing survival as a family‐controlled enterprise.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Keith Wood

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the papers in the current issue and invite comments from the readers of the journal.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the papers in the current issue and invite comments from the readers of the journal.

Design/methodology/approach

This editorial review is intended to stimulate a discussion about the effect of iterative models of professional development, the meaning of student-centred learning, valid evidence of teachers’ learning through collaborative professional development, teachers’ responses to top-down innovation and the cultural script of teaching, all of which are focal in the texts published in Issue 6.3 of the journal.

Findings

The boundaries between lesson and learning studies, top-down and bottom-up innovations, teacher learning and teacher participation and cultural scripts are far from distinct and for good reasons.

Originality/value

This editorial review provides an overview of the insights and issues identified by the authors in this issue of the journal.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Wilson Ng

Where there has been little in‐depth understanding of sovereign wealth funds, the purpose of this paper is to describe the complex nature of one of the world's largest…

Abstract

Purpose

Where there has been little in‐depth understanding of sovereign wealth funds, the purpose of this paper is to describe the complex nature of one of the world's largest sovereign wealth funds, Temasek Holdings (“Temasek”), whose “active” investment strategy has been emulated by a number of other funds.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws mainly on public data in developing a case history of Temasek.

Findings

Based on this data, the paper suggests how the firm's underlying strategy seems to be about pursuing the national interests of its sovereign shareholder in both a commercial and non‐commercial manner.

Research limitations/implications

Consistent with a case‐based approach, the paper presents a single example of a sovereign wealth fund.

Practical implications

The aggressive manner in which Temasek has built up its international portfolio coupled with the mixed impact of its “active” investment strategy raise a number of issues about the nature of an important sovereign wealth fund.

Originality/value

The value of the paper is in its cogent, insightful picture of the development of a sovereign wealth fund that was a pioneer of this phenomenon.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Astrid K. Chludek

In contrast to common literature that suggests that trade credit is an extremely expensive source of financing with annual interest rates exceeding 40 percent, this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

In contrast to common literature that suggests that trade credit is an extremely expensive source of financing with annual interest rates exceeding 40 percent, this paper seeks to argue that the average interest rate of trade credit does not exceed the cost of alternative funds, thereby explaining why trade credit constitutes a substantial part of the optimal financing mix of large, liquid, and capital market listed firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Besides providing a formula for estimating a firm's actual trade credit interest rate, this paper is mainly based on a descriptive analysis of trade credit use as well as on survey results of a broad range of prior studies.

Findings

The paper finds that highly liquid firms use substantial amounts of trade credit, thus indicating that trade credit use per se cannot be as expensive as literature supposes. In line, estimated average interest rates are about 4 to 6 percent.

Originality/value

By arguing that actual cost of trade credit use is far from being as high as literature supposes, this paper provides important implications for optimal short‐term financing strategies as well as for the assessment of trade credit use in credit worthiness analyses.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Cinzia Dessi, Wilson Ng, Michela Floris and Stefano Cabras

The purpose of this paper is to explore the “perceptive concordance” – the proximity of perceptions of the business- between key managers and customers of two small…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the “perceptive concordance” – the proximity of perceptions of the business- between key managers and customers of two small family-owned and managed businesses (“FBs”) and two larger non-FBs in Cagliari, Italy as a preliminary basis for understanding how small retail businesses that are typically family owned have continued to compete and thrive in many Western European cities.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors asked how small FBs have been able to compete in an advanced European economy despite apparent competitive disadvantages relative to large superstores selling the same products. In addressing this question the authors drew on a qualitative research methodology in which the authors interviewed senior managers and surveyed customers of the four businesses and applied an original statistical model to assess the degree of their perceptive concordance with over 100 customers of each business.

Findings

The study's findings suggest a significant difference between key managers and customers of the sampled FBs and non-FBs in the perceptive concordance of the respective businesses held by those managers and customers.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the research in this study the authors have developed a number of scholarly and managerial implications in the way that both FBs and non-FBs may retain old customers and gain new ones by anticipating and not merely responding to their product and service preferences.

Originality/value

This paper extends the literature on customer relations management (“CRM”) in FBs by explaining how small High Street FBs in competitive retail businesses have continued to thrive in Western Europe where owner-managers have developed and successfully leveraged their tacit knowledge of the requirements of repeat customers.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2016

Jan de Leede and Paddy Heuver

New Ways of Working seems to change the leadership agenda. Activity-based working and home-based work lead to different behaviors of employees. Supervising styles will…

Abstract

New Ways of Working seems to change the leadership agenda. Activity-based working and home-based work lead to different behaviors of employees. Supervising styles will change from command-and-control toward goal-setting-and-trust. This chapter describes the trend and provides new data on the actual use and effectiveness of these new supervision styles. It appears to be a mix of different leadership styles, such as leading by vision, setting targets and control on output, providing trust.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Iain Clacher

Abstract

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Claire Seaman, Stuart Graham and Richard Ben

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Pasi Pohjolainen, Markus Vinnari and Pekka Jokinen

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the barriers perceived by consumers to lowering their meat consumption levels and adopting a plant-based diet, which means a diet…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the barriers perceived by consumers to lowering their meat consumption levels and adopting a plant-based diet, which means a diet that includes mainly non-meat foods, yet it can contain both vegetarian and meat meals.

Design/methodology/approach

The prevalence of different barriers for following a plant-based diet is addressed, as well as consumer profiles considering socio-demographics, values and meat consumption frequencies. The data were collected in 2010 by a survey questionnaire, sent to 4,000 randomly selected Finns (response rate=47.3, n=1,890).

Findings

Different types of barriers are perceived to hinder the adoption of a plant-based diet, including meat enjoyment, eating routines, health conceptions and difficulties in preparing vegetarian foods. These barriers are strongly correlated, indicating that consumers may not make qualitative difference between different barriers. Furthermore, there are distinct socio-demographic, value and especially meat consumption frequency elements that strengthen the barrier perception, these being male gender, young age, rural residence, household type of families with children, low education, absence of a vegetarian family member or friend, valuation of traditions and wealth and high meat consumption frequency.

Social implications

High meat consumption is related to many environmental and public health problems. The results call for multifaceted policy implications that should concentrate on different barriers and certain socio-demographic, value and meat eating groups. Importantly, focus should be not only on the group with the strongest barrier perception but also on those particularly willing to make changes in their meat consumption patterns. One practical implication could be to increase the availability of vegetarian foods in public cafeterias or school canteens, as a decrease in meat consumption frequency is strongly correlated with the alleviation of the barrier perception.

Originality/value

Information about differences in socio-demographics, values and meat consumption frequencies between consumers provide opportunities for focussing policy actions to aid the adoption of a plant-based diet.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Anthony Worsley and Emma Lea

Aims to investigate the relationships between consumers' food concerns and their personal values and demographic characteristics.

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to investigate the relationships between consumers' food concerns and their personal values and demographic characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was administered in a cross sectional random population survey conducted among a sample of 1,000 adults in South Australia. The questionnaire elicited information about respondents' concerns about 20 food and health issues, the perceived importance of 23 values items derived from the Schwartz values inventory, and their demographic characteristics.

Findings

Principal components analyses derived four food concerns factors and six personal values factors. Respondents' safety concerns scores were positively associated with devout‐tradition, order‐discipline, and moderate‐independent values. Their disease concerns score was positively linked to beauty‐nature, devout‐tradition, and order‐discipline. Multiple regression and chi‐square automatic interaction detection (CHAID) analyses showed that individual values items were strong predictors of consumers; specific concerns such as food and heart disease, and, genetic modification of foods.

Research limitations/implications

The research was based on a cross sectional study. More refined indices of food concerns and personal values should be used in replications of this preliminary study.

Practical implications

The findings support the use of psychographic market segmentation approaches in communication programs about food and health issues.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that personal values, may be stronger predictors of consumers' concerns about food and health issues than demographics. They also show that measurement level of values and concerns influence the observed strength of their relationships.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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