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1 – 10 of 35
Article
Publication date: 20 April 2020

Wouter Robijn, Martin C. Euwema, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Jana Deprez

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between engaging leadership and open conflict norms in teams, with work engagement. A mediating role of basic needs…

2212

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between engaging leadership and open conflict norms in teams, with work engagement. A mediating role of basic needs satisfaction between these relations is proposed based on self-determination theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling was used with 133 employees who rated their leader, their team and their own basic need satisfaction and engagement to analyze the direct and indirect effects simultaneously.

Findings

The analysis confirmed that both engaging leadership and open conflict norms had an indirect effect on work engagement through basic needs satisfaction. Furthermore, engaging leadership was positively related with open conflict norms.

Research limitations/implications

The current study adds to the validation of engaging leadership as it confirms that engaging leaders strengthen work engagement through basic need satisfaction. Furthermore, it shows that not only the leader is important, but the team can impact their well-being through the creation of other social resources as open conflict norms.

Originality/value

This paper provides evidence that not only leaders are important to increase work engagement through basic needs satisfaction but also other social resources, such as conflict management. This offers a brand new perspective and opportunities on how to increase work engagement using social resources as conflict management.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Vivi Gusrini Rahmadani, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Jeroen Stouten

The current study investigates the mediating role of job resources (JRs) (i.e. person-–ob fit, value congruence, alignment, job control, use of skills, participation in…

1747

Abstract

Purpose

The current study investigates the mediating role of job resources (JRs) (i.e. person-–ob fit, value congruence, alignment, job control, use of skills, participation in decision-making, coworker support and performance feedback) and basic psychological need satisfaction at work (i.e. autonomy, relatedness, competence and meaningfulness) in the relationship between engaging leadership (EL) (i.e. inspiring, strengthening, empowering and connecting) and work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation analysis was used to test the mediation hypotheses, using a two-wave longitudinal design and an Indonesian sample of 412 employees from an agribusiness state-owned company.

Findings

The results show that EL at baseline 2017 (T1) predicts T1–T2 increase in work engagement (WE) directly, as well as indirectly through T1 JRs, and T1–T2 increase in basic psychological need satisfaction.

Originality/value

This research extends the job demands-resources (JD-R) model by showing the important role of ELfor fostering WE through increasing JRs and satisfying basic psychological needs at work.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 41 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Paraskevas Petrou, Machteld Van den Heuvel and Wilmar Schaufeli

The purpose of this paper is to examine the main and interaction effects of self-rated promotion and prevention regulatory focus on self-rated work performance, emotional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the main and interaction effects of self-rated promotion and prevention regulatory focus on self-rated work performance, emotional exhaustion and sickness absence for managers and non-managers separately. The authors expected that promotion focus relates positively to performance and negatively to sickness absence, while prevention focus relates positively to exhaustion and sickness absence, both for managers and non-managers. Furthermore, the authors expected that promotion focus relates positively to performance but also to exhaustion and sickness absence when prevention focus is high, only for managers (i.e. a manager’s dual regulatory focus can be an effective but also exhausting leadership strategy).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested the hypotheses via moderated regression analyses among two independent groups, managers (n=241) and non-managers (n=415).

Findings

Promotion focus was positively related to managers’ and non-managers’ performance and negatively to non-managers’ sickness absence, while prevention focus did not have any main effects. As expected, managers’ promotion focus was positively related to managers’ sickness absence when managers’ prevention focus was high (i.e. dual regulatory focus). Furthermore, managers’ promotion focus negatively related to managers’ performance when managers’ prevention was high, failing to support the hypothesis.

Practical implications

Promotion focus should be enhanced by organizations among leaders and employees. The authors also cautiously discuss the possibility of interventions comparing a promotion focus with dual-focus training.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to the literature by examining the joint (rather than main) effects of promotion and prevention focus on work behavior and the authors address these links among managers and non-managers.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Lotta K. Harju, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Jari J. Hakanen

The purpose of this paper is to examine cross-level effects of team-level servant leadership on job boredom and the mediating role of job crafting. Cross-level moderating effects…

4032

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine cross-level effects of team-level servant leadership on job boredom and the mediating role of job crafting. Cross-level moderating effects of team-level servant leadership were also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

This longitudinal study employed a multilevel design in a sample of 237 employees, clustered into 47 teams. Servant leadership was aggregated to the team-level to examine the effects of shared perceptions of leadership at T1 on individual-level outcome, namely job boredom, at T2. In addition, mediation analysis was used to test whether team-level servant leadership at T1 can protect followers from job boredom at T2 by fostering job crafting at T2. Cross-level moderating effects of team-level servant leadership at T1 on the relation between job crafting at T2 and job boredom at T2 were also modeled.

Findings

Job crafting at T2 mediated the cross-level effect of team-level servant leadership at T1 on job boredom at T2.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that team-level servant leadership predicts less job boredom by boosting job crafting.

Originality/value

This study is the first to assess the effects of servant leadership on job boredom and the mediating role of job crafting. This paper examines job boredom in a multilevel design, thus extending knowledge on its contextual components.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 January 2023

Chin Ann Chong, Lee Peng Ng and I-Chi Chen

This study evaluates the moderating role of work-based social supports (i.e. supervisor support and co-worker support) in the relationship between job insecurity and job burnout…

3241

Abstract

Purpose

This study evaluates the moderating role of work-based social supports (i.e. supervisor support and co-worker support) in the relationship between job insecurity and job burnout among hospitality employees in Malaysia. Besides, the direct effect between job insecurity and job burnout is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The cross-sectional data of this study were based on a total of 220 self-administered questionnaires that have been completed by hospitality employees from three different states in Malaysia. Respondents were recruited based on a snowball sampling approach. The data were collected during the COVID-19 pandemic, which was from October 2020 to January 2021.

Findings

Partial least square-structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was performed via SmartPLS software. The finding confirmed that job insecurity significantly intensifies employees' job burnout. Supervisor support and co-worker support were found to moderate the link between job insecurity and burnout. As anticipated, the relationship between job insecurity and job burnout increased when supervisor support is low. But high co-worker support was found to strengthen the impact of job insecurity on job burnout instead of the reverse.

Originality/value

This study supplements the existing literature by clarifying which sources of work-based social support (i.e. co-worker support or supervisor) is more salient in alleviating the adverse impact of job insecurity on job burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic among hospitality employees in Malaysia.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Ilona van Beek, Toon W. Taris, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Veerle Brenninkmeijer

The present study aims to investigate the motivational correlates of two types of heavy work investment: workaholism and work engagement. Building on Higgins's regulatory focus…

2169

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to investigate the motivational correlates of two types of heavy work investment: workaholism and work engagement. Building on Higgins's regulatory focus theory, the paper examines which work goals workaholic and engaged employees pursue and which strategies they use to achieve these goals. Furthermore, the paper examines how workaholism and work engagement relate to three different work outcomes: job satisfaction, turnover intention, and job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a cross-sectional survey study among 680 Dutch employees in the banking industry were analysed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The analyses revealed that workaholism was primarily and positively associated with having a prevention focus, whereas work engagement was primarily and positively associated with having a promotion focus. Furthermore, workaholism was negatively related to job satisfaction and job performance, and positively related to turnover intention, whereas work engagement was positively associated with job satisfaction and job performance, and negatively associated with turnover intention. Both forms of heavy work investment almost fully mediated the associations between the regulatory foci and the three work outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The conclusions rely on self-report data, a relatively homogeneous sample, and a cross-sectional design. This may have biased our findings to some degree and does not allow inferring causal conclusions.

Practical implications

The findings show that workaholic and engaged employees have different work goals and use different strategies to pursue these goals. Moreover, both forms of heavy work investment are oppositely related to work outcomes. Organizations may develop policies to reduce workaholism and to promote work engagement by influencing their employees' regulatory foci.

Originality/value

The present study demonstrates that two types of heavy work investment can be distinguished, each with a unique motivational make-up and a unique pattern of work outcomes.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Qiao Hu and Wilmar B. Schaufeli

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of job insecurity (past job downsizing and anticipated job downsizing) and current remuneration – via wellbeing (burnout and work…

3382

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of job insecurity (past job downsizing and anticipated job downsizing) and current remuneration – via wellbeing (burnout and work engagement) – on organizational outcomes (organization commitment and low turnover intention) of Chinese family‐owned business.

Design/methodology/approach

The Job Demands‐Resources (JD‐R) model is used as a conceptual framework and data from 585 workers of three Chinese family‐style factories were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results confirm the hypothesized model indicating that in accordance with the JD‐R model: job resources (i.e. job downsizing and current remuneration) are associated with organizational outcomes through wellbeing (burnout and work engagement) and; anticipated job downsizing fully mediates the relation of past job downsizing with wellbeing.

Originality/value

The current study examined the effects of job insecurity (i.e. downsizing) and current remuneration on organization outcomes of workers in Chinese family‐owned business using a questionnaire survey. To date, studies using the JD‐R model focused on other work characteristics but overlooked the potential role of job insecurity and current remuneration. The study demonstrated the importance of anticipated and past downsizing and current remuneration for employee wellbeing and organization outcomes.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Qiao Hu, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Toon W. Taris

This study aims to investigate the relation between job demands and job resources on the one hand and employee well‐being (burnout and work engagement) on the other. It was…

2395

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relation between job demands and job resources on the one hand and employee well‐being (burnout and work engagement) on the other. It was assumed that this relation is mediated by an equity‐based cognitive evaluation process.

Design/methodology/approach

This mediation hypothesis was tested using the Job‐Demands Resources model in two Chinese samples of blue collar workers (n=625) and nurses (n=1,381).

Findings

As expected, structural equation analysis revealed that equity mediated the relation of job demands and job resources with burnout and work engagement among nurses. However, mediation was only partly confirmed among blue collar workers. In addition, and as expected, among nurses equity was non‐linearly related with burnout.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional design of the present study precludes causal conclusions.

Originality/value

The study extended the JD‐R model with an equity‐based cognitive evaluation process.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Dina Guglielmi, Silvia Simbula, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Marco Depolo

This study aims to investigate school principals' well‐being by using the job demands‐resources (JD‐R) model as a theoretical framework. It aims at making a significant…

3342

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate school principals' well‐being by using the job demands‐resources (JD‐R) model as a theoretical framework. It aims at making a significant contribution to the development of this model by considering not only job demands and job resources, but also the role of personal resources and personal demands as predictors of work engagement and burnout. In particular, it was hypothesised that job demands may mediate the relationship between workaholism and burnout, whereas job resources may mediate the relationship between self‐efficacy and work engagement and burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey study was conducted. In total, 224 school principals (67 percent women) during training activities completed a questionnaire.

Findings

The results of SEM analyses largely supported the hypotheses by showing that personal variables operate as initiators of health impairment and motivational processes.

Research limitations/implications

The study lends support to the literature on individual resources that underlines the role that personal resources play in work engagement and burnout. It contributes to the JD‐R model by highlighting the role of personal demands (i.e. workaholism), which has an effect on the development of burnout in school principals.

Practical implications

The implications of these findings for interventions aimed at the promotion of school principals' well‐being are discussed.

Originality/value

This study advances the understanding of the role played by personal resources and personal demands in the job demands‐resources model. The value added is represented by the study of workaholism as personal demand, which in turn influences job demands and also the health impairment it triggers.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Corine van Wijhe, Maria Peeters, Wilmar Schaufeli and Marcel van den Hout

This study aims at disentangling the different underlying motivations that drive workaholic and engaged employees to work excessively hard. The Mood as Input (MAI) model serves as…

2990

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at disentangling the different underlying motivations that drive workaholic and engaged employees to work excessively hard. The Mood as Input (MAI) model serves as an explanatory framework. The MAI model assumes that, dependent on the stop rule used, a different mood state may lead to persistence. When individuals evaluate whether they still enjoy an activity (an enjoyment stop rule), a positive mood would signal enjoyment, resulting in persistence. On the other hand, when individuals evaluate whether they have done enough (an enough stop rule), a negative mood would signal discontentment, which would also result in persistence.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey study (n=173) was conducted to test the applicability of the MAI model to the work context.

Findings

It was hypothesized and found that workaholism is positively related to negative mood and using an enough stop rule to determine when to stop working. In addition, this study showed that work engagement is related to positive mood. The findings did not support the expectation that work engagement is related to using an enjoyment stop rule to determine when to stop working. In conclusion, the results indicate that both mood and stop rules may be useful for explaining the difference in motivation to work persistently between workaholism and work engagement.

Originality/value

The paper advances the understanding of reasons to work hard which are related to work engagement and workaholism. Knowledge about the reasons why employees work hard can help professionals to prevent workaholism, thereby stimulating healthy and enduring careers.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

1 – 10 of 35