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Article

Ching-Hsuan Yeh, Yi-Shun Wang, Shin-Jeng Lin, Timmy H. Tseng, Hsin-Hui Lin, Ying-Wei Shih and Yi-Hsuan Lai

Considering that users’ information privacy concerns may affect the development of e-commerce, the purpose of this paper is to explore what drives internet users…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering that users’ information privacy concerns may affect the development of e-commerce, the purpose of this paper is to explore what drives internet users’ willingness to provide personal information; further, the paper examines how extrinsic rewards moderate the relationship between users’ information privacy concerns and willingness to provide personal information.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 345 valid internet users in the context of electronic commerce were analyzed using the partial least squares approach.

Findings

The result showed that agreeableness, risk-taking propensity and experience of privacy invasion were three main antecedents of information privacy concerns among the seven individual factors. Additionally, information privacy concerns did not significantly affect users’ willingness to provide personal information in the privacy calculation mechanism; however, extrinsic rewards directly affected users’ disclosure intention. The authors found that extrinsic rewards had not moderated the relationship between users’ information privacy concerns and their willingness to provide personal information.

Originality/value

This study is an exploratory effort to develop and validate a model for explaining why internet users were willing to provide personal information. The results of this study are helpful to researchers in developing theories of information privacy concerns and to practitioners in promoting internet users’ willingness to provide personal information in an e-commerce context.

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Book part

Arief Rahman

Citizens are substantial stakeholders in every e-government system, thus their willingness to use and ability to access the system are critical. Unequal access and…

Abstract

Citizens are substantial stakeholders in every e-government system, thus their willingness to use and ability to access the system are critical. Unequal access and information and communication technology usage, which is known as digital divide, however has been identified as one of the major obstacles to the implementation of e-government system. As digital divide inhibits citizen’s acceptance to e-government, it should be overcome despite the lack of deep theoretical understanding on this issue. This research aimed to investigate the digital divide and its direct impact on e-government system success of local governments in Indonesia as well as indirect impact through the mediation role of trust. In order to get a comprehensive understanding of digital divide, this study introduced a new type of digital divide, the innovativeness divide.

The research problems were approached by applying two-stage sequential mixed method research approach comprising of both qualitative and quantitative studies. In the first phase, an initial research model was proposed based on a literature review. Semi-structured interview with 12 users of e-government systems was then conducted to explore and enhance this initial research model. Data collected in this phase were analyzed with a two-stage content analysis approach and the initial model was then amended based on the findings. As a result, a comprehensive research model with 16 hypotheses was proposed for examination in the second phase.

In the second phase, quantitative method was applied. A questionnaire was developed based on findings in the first phase. A pilot study was conducted to refine the questionnaire, which was then distributed in a national survey resulting in 237 useable responses. Data collected in this phase were analyzed using Partial Least Square based Structural Equation Modeling.

The results of quantitative analysis confirmed 13 hypotheses. All direct influences of the variables of digital divide on e-government system success were supported. The mediating effects of trust in e-government in the relationship between capability divide and e-government system success as well as in the relationship between innovativeness divide and e-government system success were supported, but was rejected in the relationship between access divide and e-government system success. Furthermore, the results supported the moderating effects of demographic variables of age, residential place, and education.

This research has both theoretical and practical contributions. The study contributes to the developments of literature on digital divide and e-government by providing a more comprehensive framework, and also to the implementation of e-government by local governments and the improvement of e-government Readiness Index of Indonesia.

Details

E-Services Adoption: Processes by Firms in Developing Nations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-325-9

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Article

A. Zorotheos and E. Kafeza

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the internet users' privacy concerns (concerns for information privacy, CFIP) and perceived privacy control (PPC) affect…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the internet users' privacy concerns (concerns for information privacy, CFIP) and perceived privacy control (PPC) affect their willingness to use internet web places in order to transact. A theoretical model is introduced that describes how users' CFIP and PPC may affect their willingness to transact through web places when personal information must be disclosed in order to accomplish the transaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The research model is empirically tested using data collected with a survey that include items for each of the constructs of the model. The survey is administrated to 190 internet users and resulted in 142 usable responses through questionnaires. In order to test the hypotheses, multidimensional regression analysis is used.

Findings

The findings indicate that both users' CFIP and users' PPC (some dimensions of them) have direct impact not only to users' trust toward the web site as expected but also to the willingness to transact through the internet when personal information needs to be disclosed.

Research limitations/implications

In this paper, an introductory analysis is conducted in order to preliminary test the validity and credibility of the research model. In this first approach, the multidimensional regression analysis is used. Currently, the paper deals with the use of structural equation modeling in order to better test the research model. The research could be conducted also online in order to investigate users' behavior under real circumstances.

Practical implications

The more users know about their personal information the less willing they are to make purchases through internet. Moreover, if web places improve their mechanisms and procedures that correct better the inaccuracies and the errors in the users' stored personal data then users' willingness to retrieve information from web sites improves too.

Originality/value

Existing studies constitute the basic theoretical framework but until now there is not a model that connects both users' CFIP and users' PPC with the willingness to transact through the internet and with users' trust upon the web sites.

Details

Direct Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-5933

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Article

Jari Juga, Jouni Juntunen and Timo Koivumäki

This study aims to explicate the behavioral factors that determine willingness to share personal health data for secondary uses.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explicate the behavioral factors that determine willingness to share personal health data for secondary uses.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model is developed and tested with structural equation modeling using survey data from Finland.

Findings

It is shown that attitude toward information sharing is the strongest factor contributing to the willingness to share personal health information (PHI). Trust and control serve as mediating factors between the attitude and willingness to share PHI.

Research limitations/implications

The measures of the model need further refinement to cover the various aspects of the behavioral concepts.

Practical implications

The model provides useful insights into the factors that affect the willingness for information sharing in health care and in other areas where personal information is distributed.

Social implications

Sharing of PHI for secondary purposes can offer social benefits through improvements in health-care performance.

Originality/value

A broad-scale empirical data gives a unique view of attitudes toward sharing of PHI in one national setting.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

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Article

Pouyan Esmaeilzadeh

Health information exchange (HIE) initiatives utilize sharing mechanisms through which health information is mostly transmitted without a patient's close supervision;…

Abstract

Purpose

Health information exchange (HIE) initiatives utilize sharing mechanisms through which health information is mostly transmitted without a patient's close supervision; thus, patient trust in the HIE is the core in this setting. Existing technology acceptance theories mainly consider cognitive beliefs resulting in adoption behavior. The study argues that existing theories should be expanded to cover not only cognitive beliefs but also the emotion provoked by the sharing nature of the technology. Based on the theory of reasoned action, the technology adoption literature, and the trust literature, we theoretically explain and empirically test the impact of perceived transparency of privacy policy on cognitive trust and emotional trust in HIEs. Moreover, the study analyzes the effects of cognitive trust and emotional trust on the intention to opt in to HIEs and willingness to disclose health information.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted using data from individuals who were aware of HIEs through experience with at least one provider participating in an HIE network. Data were collected from a wide range of adult population groups in the United States.

Findings

The structural equation modeling analysis results provide empirical support for the proposed model. The model highlights the strategic role of the perceived transparency of the privacy policy in building trust in HIEs. When patients know more about HIE security measures, sharing procedures, and privacy terms, they feel more in control, more assured, and less at risk. The results also show that patient trust in HIEs may take the forms of intention to opt in to an HIE and willingness to disclose health information exchanged through HIE networks.

Originality/value

The findings of this study should be of interest to both academics and practitioners. The research highlights the importance of developing and using a transparent privacy policy in the diffusion of HIEs. The findings provide a deep understanding of dimensions of HIE privacy policy that should be addressed by health-care organizations to exchange personal health information in a secure and private manner.

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Article

Cristian Morosan

Facial recognition systems represent a viable solution to today’s hotels’ security and service challenges. The purpose of this study was to build and empirically validate…

Abstract

Purpose

Facial recognition systems represent a viable solution to today’s hotels’ security and service challenges. The purpose of this study was to build and empirically validate a conceptual model that examined consumers’ willingness to create a profile based on biometric information disclosed via facial recognition systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 421 US general population consumers who stayed in hotels. The study used a confirmatory factor analysis to test the measurement model and a structural equation modeling approach to empirically validate the structural model.

Findings

It was found that the benefit of information disclosure was the strongest predictor of value of disclosure and that value of disclosure and privacy concerns influenced consumers’ willingness to disclose biometric information. In turn, consumers’ willingness to disclose biometric information and their desire to be loyal to hotels influenced consumers’ willingness to create a profile.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first study to examine profile creation and biometric information disclosure via facial recognition systems in hotels, a technology that is likely to disrupt the current authentication and service quality models in hotels. This study also advances the literature by expanding the scope of the privacy calculus by adding social rewards, and by elucidating the role of desires in service contexts.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Dane Peterson, David Meinert, John Criswell and Martin Crossland

This study aims to compare the effectiveness of third‐party seals with self‐reported privacy policy statements with regard to the willingness of potential e‐commerce…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to compare the effectiveness of third‐party seals with self‐reported privacy policy statements with regard to the willingness of potential e‐commerce customers to provide web sites with various types of personal information.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to 374 graduate business students at two Midwestern universities in the USA.

Findings

The results indicated that third‐party seals were not as effective as self‐reported privacy statements with a strong guarantee of security.

Research limitations/implications

This study did not provide any evidence to support the necessity for small enterprises to incur the added costs in terms of money and time required to obtain a third‐party seal. Rather the results suggest small enterprises may increase consumer trust more effectively through strong privacy policy statements.

Originality/value

This study provides useful information on the effectiveness of third‐party seals with self‐reported privacy policy statements with regard to the willingness of potential e‐commerce customers to provide web sites with various types of personal information.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article

Kai Li, Xiaowen Wang, Kunrong Li and Jianguo Che

As social network sites (SNS) have increasingly become one of the most important channels for communication, the related privacy issues gain more and more attention in…

Abstract

Purpose

As social network sites (SNS) have increasingly become one of the most important channels for communication, the related privacy issues gain more and more attention in both industry and academic research fields. This study aims to connect the antecedents of information privacy disclosure on SNS.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on exchange theory, this study tries to investigate the decision-making process for information privacy disclosure on SNS. Factors from both user’s and website’s perspectives are taken into account in the proposed model.

Findings

The results suggest that an individual’s perceived benefits will increase their willingness to disclose information privacy on SNS, but perceived risks decrease this kind of willingness. The authors also find social network size, personal innovativeness and incentive provision positively affect people’s perceived benefits.

Originality/value

Moreover, privacy invasion experience enhances perceived personal risks, but website reputation helps to reduce perceived risks.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

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Article

Peni Fukofuka, Neil Fargher and Zhe Wang

This purpose of this study is to further the study of escalation of commitment by considering the supportive role of accountants in providing reports that favour…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this study is to further the study of escalation of commitment by considering the supportive role of accountants in providing reports that favour continuation of unprofitable projects and whether this role is influenced by culture. Research on the escalation of commitment suggests that the decision to commit resources to a failing project is due to several factors that include sunk costs, personal responsibility and culture.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a between-subjects design to examine accountants’ willingness to provide a report that facilitates continuation of an unprofitable project. The manipulated independent variables are sunk cost (present or absent), the level of reporting responsibility (high or low) and culture (Pacific Islands or Australia).

Findings

Our results show that the presence of sunk cost is a motivation for accountants to provide reports that favour continuation of an unprofitable project. The results on cultural difference are also consistent with the contention that culture is influential in decision-making with respect to providing reports that favour continuation of an unprofitable project. We do not, however, find evidence consistent with a personal responsibility affect using the manipulation defined in this study.

Research limitations/implications

Consistent with this type of research, the results must be interpreted with respect to the specific design choices used in the experiment.

Practical implications

Continued research is needed to examine the impact of sunk costs and specific attributes of culture, such as the willingness to follow superiors, on the escalation of commitment to unprofitable projects. The mitigation of such effects through education of accountants to provide reports that do not favour continuation of unprofitable projects would, for example, be of interest to aid agencies and others investing in projects in developing economies in particular.

Originality/value

While previous research generally examines the decision-making role of managers in escalation of commitment to unprofitable projects, this study examines the supportive role that accountants play in facilitating managers’ escalation decisions. This issue is studied within a context examining the potential cultural impact of respect for authority.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

1 – 10 of over 29000