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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

David J. Pauleen and William Y.C. Wang

This viewpoint study aims to make the case that the field of knowledge management (KM) must respond to the significant changes that big data/analytics is bringing to…

Abstract

Purpose

This viewpoint study aims to make the case that the field of knowledge management (KM) must respond to the significant changes that big data/analytics is bringing to operationalizing the production of organizational data and information.

Design/methodology/approach

This study expresses the opinions of the guest editors of “Does Big Data Mean Big Knowledge? Knowledge Management Perspectives on Big Data and Analytics”.

Findings

A Big Data/Analytics-Knowledge Management (BDA-KM) model is proposed that illustrates the centrality of knowledge as the guiding principle in the use of big data/analytics in organizations.

Research limitations/implications

This is an opinion piece, and the proposed model still needs to be empirically verified.

Practical implications

It is suggested that academics and practitioners in KM must be capable of controlling the application of big data/analytics, and calls for further research investigating how KM can conceptually and operationally use and integrate big data/analytics to foster organizational knowledge for better decision-making and organizational value creation.

Originality/value

The BDA-KM model is one of the early models placing knowledge as the primary consideration in the successful organizational use of big data/analytics.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

H.K. Chan, William Y.C. Wang, Lee H.S. Luong and Felix T.S. Chan

Facing uncertain demand and supply, customers and suppliers are encouraged to make their supply chain more flexible and adaptive to the environment. The primary objective…

Abstract

Purpose

Facing uncertain demand and supply, customers and suppliers are encouraged to make their supply chain more flexible and adaptive to the environment. The primary objective of this paper is to gain an understanding of the issues surrounding flexibility and adaptability in supply chain management from an industrial practitioner.

Design/methodology/approach

A semi‐structured interview and follow up interviews were conducted with a logistics manager of a renowned international company.

Findings

The study supports that the aforementioned characteristics, flexibility and adaptability, are useful in practical supply chain applications. Some practical advice is also reported.

Originality/value

This paper bridges the gap between academic theoretical studies and the expectations from an industrial practitioner regarding flexibility and adaptability in supply chain management. A similar study could be extended to more industrial practitioners in order to collect more useful opinions from them.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Abstract

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Ravinder Kumar and Rajesh Kumar Singh

Globalization and liberalization of the world economy have leveled the field for all competitors across the globe. To face global competition successfully, SMEs have to…

Abstract

Purpose

Globalization and liberalization of the world economy have leveled the field for all competitors across the globe. To face global competition successfully, SMEs have to break their isolation in the value chain. To overcome the dynamic challenges of the market, supply chain management can be an important tool for SMEs. The purpose of this paper is to synthesize different issues related to the coordination and responsiveness of supply chain management in SMEs, through a review of the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 116 research papers, mainly from referred international journals, are reviewed to identify the thrust areas of research. On the basis of the review, gaps are identified and a research agenda is proposed.

Findings

It is observed from the review that SMEs have not been very proactive in implementing supply chain management. These organizations face a lot of problems in coordinating their operations with other members of the supply chain. They are localized in functioning. On export fronts SMEs face many constraints due to lack of resources and poor innovative capabilities. To face the challenges of open global market, SMEs have to manage their problems and supply chain risks effectively. Research gaps are identified in different areas of the supply chain such as coordination and responsiveness issues, service quality issues, and performance benchmarking for future directions of research.

Originality/value

This paper explores the major areas for research on coordination and responsiveness of SME supply chains. The findings of the paper will be highly useful for the researchers to decide the direction of their research.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2015

Chun Kit Lok

Smart card-based E-payment systems are receiving increasing attention as the number of implementations is witnessed on the rise globally. Understanding of user adoption…

Abstract

Smart card-based E-payment systems are receiving increasing attention as the number of implementations is witnessed on the rise globally. Understanding of user adoption behavior of E-payment systems that employ smart card technology becomes a research area that is of particular value and interest to both IS researchers and professionals. However, research interest focuses mostly on why a smart card-based E-payment system results in a failure or how the system could have grown into a success. This signals the fact that researchers have not had much opportunity to critically review a smart card-based E-payment system that has gained wide support and overcome the hurdle of critical mass adoption. The Octopus in Hong Kong has provided a rare opportunity for investigating smart card-based E-payment system because of its unprecedented success. This research seeks to thoroughly analyze the Octopus from technology adoption behavior perspectives.

Cultural impacts on adoption behavior are one of the key areas that this research posits to investigate. Since the present research is conducted in Hong Kong where a majority of population is Chinese ethnicity and yet is westernized in a number of aspects, assuming that users in Hong Kong are characterized by eastern or western culture is less useful. Explicit cultural characteristics at individual level are tapped into here instead of applying generalization of cultural beliefs to users to more accurately reflect cultural bias. In this vein, the technology acceptance model (TAM) is adapted, extended, and tested for its applicability cross-culturally in Hong Kong on the Octopus. Four cultural dimensions developed by Hofstede are included in this study, namely uncertainty avoidance, masculinity, individualism, and Confucian Dynamism (long-term orientation), to explore their influence on usage behavior through the mediation of perceived usefulness.

TAM is also integrated with the innovation diffusion theory (IDT) to borrow two constructs in relation to innovative characteristics, namely relative advantage and compatibility, in order to enhance the explanatory power of the proposed research model. Besides, the normative accountability of the research model is strengthened by embracing two social influences, namely subjective norm and image. As the last antecedent to perceived usefulness, prior experience serves to bring in the time variation factor to allow level of prior experience to exert both direct and moderating effects on perceived usefulness.

The resulting research model is analyzed by partial least squares (PLS)-based Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) approach. The research findings reveal that all cultural dimensions demonstrate direct effect on perceived usefulness though the influence of uncertainty avoidance is found marginally significant. Other constructs on innovative characteristics and social influences are validated to be significant as hypothesized. Prior experience does indeed significantly moderate the two influences that perceived usefulness receives from relative advantage and compatibility, respectively. The research model has demonstrated convincing explanatory power and so may be employed for further studies in other contexts. In particular, cultural effects play a key role in contributing to the uniqueness of the model, enabling it to be an effective tool to help critically understand increasingly internationalized IS system development and implementation efforts. This research also suggests several practical implications in view of the findings that could better inform managerial decisions for designing, implementing, or promoting smart card-based E-payment system.

Details

E-services Adoption: Processes by Firms in Developing Nations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-709-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Elizabeth P. Karam, William L. Gardner, Daniel P. Gullifor, Lori L. Tribble and Mingwei Li

Academic and practitioner attention to the constructs of authentic leadership and work engagement and their implications for organizations has grown dramatically over the…

Abstract

Academic and practitioner attention to the constructs of authentic leadership and work engagement and their implications for organizations has grown dramatically over the past decade. Consideration of the implications of these constructs for high-performance human resource practices (HPHRP) is limited, however. In this monograph, we present a conceptual model that integrates authentic leadership/followership theory with theory and research on HPHRP. Then, we apply this model to systematically consider the implications of skill-enhancing, motivation-enhancing, and opportunity-enhancing HR practices in combination with authentic leadership for authentic followership, follower work engagement, and follower performance. We contend that authentic leadership, through various influences processes, promotes HPHRP, and vice versa, to help foster enhanced work engagement. By cultivating greater work engagement, individuals are motivated to bring their best, most authentic selves to the workplace and are more likely to achieve higher levels of both well-being and performance.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

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Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2016

Marc Wouters, Susana Morales, Sven Grollmuss and Michael Scheer

The paper provides an overview of research published in the innovation and operations management (IOM) literature on 15 methods for cost management in new product…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper provides an overview of research published in the innovation and operations management (IOM) literature on 15 methods for cost management in new product development, and it provides a comparison to an earlier review of the management accounting (MA) literature (Wouters & Morales, 2014).

Methodology/approach

This structured literature search covers papers published in 23 journals in IOM in the period 1990–2014.

Findings

The search yielded a sample of 208 unique papers with 275 results (one paper could refer to multiple cost management methods). The top 3 methods are modular design, component commonality, and product platforms, with 115 results (42%) together. In the MA literature, these three methods accounted for 29%, but target costing was the most researched cost management method by far (26%). Simulation is the most frequently used research method in the IOM literature, whereas this was averagely used in the MA literature; qualitative studies were the most frequently used research method in the MA literature, whereas this was averagely used in the IOM literature. We found a lot of papers presenting practical approaches or decision models as a further development of a particular cost management method, which is a clear difference from the MA literature.

Research limitations/implications

This review focused on the same cost management methods, and future research could also consider other cost management methods which are likely to be more important in the IOM literature compared to the MA literature. Future research could also investigate innovative cost management practices in more detail through longitudinal case studies.

Originality/value

This review of research on methods for cost management published outside the MA literature provides an overview for MA researchers. It highlights key differences between both literatures in their research of the same cost management methods.

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Abdelkebir Sahid, Yassine Maleh and Mustapha Belaissaoui

Abstract

Details

Strategic Information System Agility: From Theory to Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-811-8

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2019

Bishal B.C., Weiwei Wang, Ayfer Gurun and William Cready

For this study, the authors document day-of-the-week trading patterns of individual investors using a unique data set of NYSE-listed firms and discuss their influence on…

Abstract

Purpose

For this study, the authors document day-of-the-week trading patterns of individual investors using a unique data set of NYSE-listed firms and discuss their influence on the Monday effect. It is found that Monday stock returns are generally lower than those of other weekdays and, on average, negative. Unlike previous researchers, the authors use actual trading data for individual investors rather than proxies to measure individual investor activity, such as the percentage of odd-lot trading. The results demonstrate that the trading activity of individual investors on Mondays is lower than previously documented. This finding contradicts the long-held belief that individual investors are most active on Mondays. In addition, the authors find that individual investors’ trading activity during the week broadly follows corporate announcement patterns. The least amount of firm-specific information is released on Friday, followed by Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Wednesday. Accordingly, individual investors trade the least number of shares on Friday, followed by Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Wednesday, strengthening the argument that individual investors trade on attention-grabbing stocks. Taken together, the authors’ findings challenge those of previous studies that hold individual investors responsible for the Monday effect. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use actual trading data for individual investors rather than proxies to measure individual investor activity, such as the percentage of odd-lot trading, to study the existence of Monday effect in stock prices.

Findings

The results show that the trading activity of individual investors on Mondays is lower than previously documented. This finding contradicts the long-held belief that individual investors are most active on Mondays. In addition, the authors find that individual investors’ trading activity during the week broadly follows corporate announcement patterns.

Research limitations/implications

The authors find that individual investors’ trading activity during the week broadly follows corporate announcement patterns. The least amount of firm-specific information is released on Friday, followed by Monday. Accordingly, individual investors trade the least number of shares on Friday, followed by Monday, strengthening the argument that individual investors trade on attention-grabbing stocks. Taken together, the authors’ findings challenge those of previous studies that hold individual investors responsible for the Monday effect.

Practical implications

Financial advisors.

Originality/value

The authors find that individual investors’ trading activity during the week broadly follows corporate announcement patterns. The authors challenge the commonly hold view that individuals often make trading decisions during weekends and thus trade on Mondays, and find that the least amount of firm-specific information is released on Friday, followed by Monday. Accordingly, individual investors trade the least number of shares on Friday, followed by Monday. Taken together, the authors’ findings challenge those of previous studies that hold individual investors responsible for the Monday effect.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 45 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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