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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

William Wells, Bradley Campbell, Yudu Li and Stryker Swindle

Social scientific research is having a substantial impact on eyewitness identification procedural reforms. Police agencies in the USA have changed their eyewitness…

Abstract

Purpose

Social scientific research is having a substantial impact on eyewitness identification procedural reforms. Police agencies in the USA have changed their eyewitness practices based on the results of social scientific research. The purpose of this paper is to contribute new knowledge by using a unique set of data to describe detailed aspects of eyewitness identification procedures conducted as part of robbery investigations in Houston, TX.

Design/methodology/approach

Robbery investigators completed surveys following identification procedures conducted during a six-month period of time. The sample includes 975 identification procedures. The analysis describes important features of identification procedures and places results in the context of existing research.

Findings

Results show that photo spreads were the most frequently used lineup procedure and selection outcomes were similar to recent field studies conducted in the USA. Results also show that the type of procedure, presence of a weapon, cross-race identifications, and viewing opportunity were significantly correlated with selection outcomes.

Originality/value

Police are reforming their eyewitness identification procedures based on findings from social science research. The study measures and describe the characteristics of a large sample eyewitness procedures conducted by investigators in the field.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Patricia Sorce, Philip R. Tyler and Lynette M. Loomis

Examines an attempt to define segments within the Older Americanmarket based on lifestyle variations. Identifies four clusters withsignificant marketing potential…

Abstract

Examines an attempt to define segments within the Older American market based on lifestyle variations. Identifies four clusters with significant marketing potential: Self‐Reliants, Active Retirees, Family Oriented, and Young and Secures. Concludes that lifestyle variables should be used to segment the market, the difficulties in using them indicating a need for a standardized lifestyle inventory for the Older American market.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

David P. Stowell, Tim Moore and Jeff Schumacher

Are hedge funds heroes or villains? Management of Blockbuster, Time Warner, Six Flags, Knight-Ridder, and Bally Total Fitness might prefer the “villain” appellation, but…

Abstract

Are hedge funds heroes or villains? Management of Blockbuster, Time Warner, Six Flags, Knight-Ridder, and Bally Total Fitness might prefer the “villain” appellation, but Enron, WorldCom, Tyco, and HealthSouth shareholders might view management as the real villains and hedge funds as vehicles to oust incompetent corporate managers before they run companies into the ground or steal them through fraudulent transactions. Could the pressure exerted by activist hedge funds on targeted companies result in increased share prices, management accountability, and better communication with shareholders? Or does it distract management from its primary goal of enhancing long-term shareholder value?

To determine the benefits and disadvantages of activist hedge fund activity from the perspective of corporate management and shareholders; to examine if a hedge fund's suggested corporate restructuring could create greater shareholder value; and to explain the changing roles and perspectives of hedge funds.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Donald Nelson, William H. Wells, Kevin J. Perry and Donald Hanson

This paper examines the implementation of best practices for fund directors as outlined by the Investment Company Institute (ICI) in the summer of 1999. Following a series…

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Abstract

This paper examines the implementation of best practices for fund directors as outlined by the Investment Company Institute (ICI) in the summer of 1999. Following a series of well publicised scandals across the financial services industry, the issue of corporate governance within mutual funds is both timely and practical. The purpose of the study is to measure the consistency of implementation of the 15 best practices within fund families. The data indicate that mutual funds, in general, currently follow the guidelines proposed by the ICI. This suggests that most funds are undertaking efforts to protect investors and separate the interests of management from those of investors. These findings also have implications for proposed federal legislation. If mutual funds have already adopted procedures designed to protect investors, additional regulation is redundant.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1946

By the beginning of the war, Germany's over‐all self‐sufficiency in food had reached a level of approximately 83 per cent., on the peace‐time basis of 2,200—2,400 calories…

Abstract

By the beginning of the war, Germany's over‐all self‐sufficiency in food had reached a level of approximately 83 per cent., on the peace‐time basis of 2,200—2,400 calories per person per day. In respect to some types of food, however, the situation was not satisfactory. For example, before the war she produced approximately 73 per cent. of fish requirements, 12 per cent. of corn, 50 per cent. of legumes, and 60 per cent. of fat within her own boundaries. The country could be fed at a reduced level by the produce raised within its own boundaries if food were perfectly controlled and evenly distributed. However, in practice, individual provinces were much less favourably situated in this respect. Western Germany, an area of relatively small and diversified farms, was critically dependent on the eastern provinces for its flour, grain, and potato supplies. It is clear that all German civilians could be fed at a uniform level of adequacy during a war only by control of the country's food supply at the national level and by the continued operation of the new transportation network of the country. For this reason the bombing of rail and inland water transportation facilities became such a serious threat to national uniformity in food distribution. Of the many kinds of centralised food processing industries known in the United States, only a few played an important role in the food supply of German civilians. The principal examples of these were grain milling, sugar production and refining, and the large bakeries of urban areas. The damage or destruction of these facilities, incidental to air attack on other industrial targets, seriously decreased their production capacity. Bombing destroyed the mills for processing 9 per cent. of the German rye output and 35 per cent. of the wheat output. Of the sugar refineries four plants producing 300,000 tons annually, were destroyed. This represents a 38 per cent. decrease in production of sugar. Similarly bombing of chemical plants was largely responsible for the decrease in the supply for fertiliser nitrogen. In 1939, 718,000 tons of fertiliser nitrogen were available, but by 1945 this had decreased to 140,000 tons. The significance of this destruction of facilities vital to the feeding of a country already on a border‐line diet is ominous. Reliable estimates indicate that aerial bombings destroyed 35 per cent. of Germany's total (approximately 460,000 square metres) cold storage capacity. The increased use of cold storage intensified their dependence on transportation and on the continuity of the power supply. Aerial attack, as a result, not only decreased usable cold storage space, but also seriously interfered with the operation of the remaining space by impeding shipments and interrupting sources of power. It was the constantly reiterated opinion of all food officials that the bomb destruction of the transportation network was the largest single factor contributing to the disruption of the food supply. Bulk shipments which had been carried on inland waterways were seriously impeded by the bombing of canals. Aerial attack against railway lines, bridges and terminal facilities caused widespread interruptions in service and destroyed rolling stock, freight en route and handling facilities at terminals. It is not possible at this time to state exactly in what measure the curtailment of the national diet contributed to the ultimate defeat of Germany. The evidence available indicates, however, that it was an important factor. There is in any case no doubt that strategic bombing is the major element contributing to the present shortage of food in Germany. It was not apparent that the Germans considered the vitamin and mineral content of food in determining the ration allowances of the people. Immediately with the beginning of the war, all the principal foods were rationed, so that the lack of recognition of the importance of the vitamin and mineral content of this ration actually was an additional point of vulnerability for the German diet. With a food economy so vulnerable it is not surprising to have found that the basic food rationing programme was abandoned early in 1945 when the destruction of transport and communications by the strategic air offensive attained major proportions. This necessitated falling back on the inadequate system of regional self‐supply. The destruction of large food stocks, processing plants and cold storage plants by bombing also contributed to the general deterioration of the German food supply. There is ample evidence for the conclusion that as a result of the strategic air offensive the nutritional demands for the continued health of the German people could not be met.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Our fifth annual survey of the business leaders to keep an eye on the next year.

Abstract

Our fifth annual survey of the business leaders to keep an eye on the next year.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

William E. Warren, C.L. Abercrombie and Robert L. Berl

Reviews the findings of a study investigating the adoption of aservice innovation and the relative importance to consumers in makingthe adoption decision. Suggests…

Abstract

Reviews the findings of a study investigating the adoption of a service innovation and the relative importance to consumers in making the adoption decision. Suggests managerial implications and recommendations as a result of the study. Identifies other service industries to which the implications could be relevant. Includes an appendix describing the methodology of the study.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Shwu‐Ing Wu

States that the level of consumer involvement in a product category is a major variable relevant to advertising strategy. Suggests product category is often segmented by…

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Abstract

States that the level of consumer involvement in a product category is a major variable relevant to advertising strategy. Suggests product category is often segmented by the level of consumer involvement; however, consumers are rarely segmented. Points out that different involvement clusters have different responses to advertising effectiveness for the same product. Presents a case study segmenting a market using the consumer involvement degree, exploring the characteristics in order to determine the relationship between advertising effectiveness and the level of consumer involvement. Shows results suggesting that a high degree of consumer involvement directed a high advertising effect and is therefore an important indication for advertising strategy.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Carrie de Silva

The purpose of this paper is to consider perennial issues in the education of chartered surveyors and to use the debates and experiences of the past to inform the present…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider perennial issues in the education of chartered surveyors and to use the debates and experiences of the past to inform the present and future, particularly the question of the balance between academic and practical training.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary and secondary sources were used to establish a history of the growth of the profession and the development of formal education and assessment from the 19th century and to consider current issues with reference to wider theories of education.

Findings

The profession grew from vocational roots and did not enjoy the centuries of status of, say, the law. The 19th century saw an increasing technicalisation and professionalisation of surveying, with developments in various strands of the discipline, from the rural land agents to construction and public housing specialists. The muted reception from the universities in recognising the discipline is instructive. Looking at the relationship between classroom education and apprenticeship and what is needed in the preliminary education and assessment of surveyors holds contemporary lessons as increasing university fees has prompted renewed review of the most economical ways of training, while maintaining rigour.

Originality/value

There have been histories of surveying and of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, but this paper relates the past to the present. Its value is in highlighting the tension between the practical and academic, allowing current debates to benefit from earlier discussions and longitudinal experience of different models of education. This paves the way for a wider consideration of experiential learning theory to be applied to a fundamental review of surveying education.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Bristol Lane Voss

The stories and lore that surround companies often are mistaken for fact and, even if true, can take on more importance than what actually was relevant in making the…

Abstract

The stories and lore that surround companies often are mistaken for fact and, even if true, can take on more importance than what actually was relevant in making the companies great.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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