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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

William Van Buskirk and Dennis McGrath

Research on organizational culture has provided much neededsubtlety in understanding organizational events. However, it has acognitive bias which leaves implicit the…

Abstract

Research on organizational culture has provided much needed subtlety in understanding organizational events. However, it has a cognitive bias which leaves implicit the treatment of emotional phenomena. Organizational stories can provide a window on affect in organizations if we view stories as symbolically embedded appraisals of wellbeing. Presents an illustrative case to demonstrate how such enquiry might proceed.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Susan M. Schor, William Van Buskirk and Dennis McGrath

Presents a case description of a non‐profit educational agency whoseorganizational culture is based on the feminist values of caring, voiceand self‐reflection. Grounded…

Abstract

Presents a case description of a non‐profit educational agency whose organizational culture is based on the feminist values of caring, voice and self‐reflection. Grounded theory analysis of intensive interviews, focus groups, observations and organizational documents reveals how these values are embodied in the organization′s management practices and change processes. The case strongly suggests that a commitment to feminist values can prove highly generative of a wide range of desirable organizational competences.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Balmatee Bidassie, William Gunnar, Leigh Starr, George Van Buskirk, Lisa Warner, Clifford Anckaitis and Angela Howard

During years 2014-2016, Veterans Health Administration National Surgery Office conducted a surgical flow improvement initiative (SFII) to assist low-performing surgery…

Abstract

Purpose

During years 2014-2016, Veterans Health Administration National Surgery Office conducted a surgical flow improvement initiative (SFII) to assist low-performing surgery programs to improve their operating room efficiency (ORE). The initiative was co-sponsored by VHA National Surgery Office and VHA Office of Systems Redesign and Improvement. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

An SFII algorithm, based on first-time-start (FTS), cancellation rate (CR), lag time (LT) and OR utilization, assigned an ORE performance Level (1-low to 4-high) to each VA Medical Center (VAMC). In total, 15 VAMCs with low-performance surgery programs participated in SFII to assess the current state of their surgical flow processes and used redesign methods to focus on improvement objectives.

Findings

At the end of the project, 14 VSAs, 40 RPIWs, 45 “90-day projects” and 73 Just-Do-It’s were completed with 65 percent (158/243) improvement actions and 86 percent sites improving/sustaining all four ORE metrics. There was a statistically significant difference in improvement across the three stages (baseline, improvement, sustain) for FTS (45.6-68.7 percent; F=44.74; p<0.000); CR (16.1-9.5 percent; F=34.46; p<0.000); LT (63.1-36.3 percent; F=92.00; p<0.000); OR utilization (43.4-57.7 percent; F=6.92; p<0.001) and VAMC level (1.7-3.65; F=80.11; p<0.000). The majority developed “fair to excellent” sustainment (91 percent) and spread (82 percent) plans. The projected annual estimated return-on-investment was $27,949,966.

Originality/value

The SFII successfully leveraged a small number of faculty, coaches, and industrial engineers to produce significant improvement in ORE across a large national integrated health care network. This strategy can serve healthcare leaders in managing complex healthcare issues in their facilities.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2016

Frederick Betz

Abstract

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Strategic Thinking
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-466-9

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

John Z. Ni, Steve A. Melnyk, William J. Ritchie and Barbara F. Flynn

The purpose of this paper is to focus on adoption of certified management standards, specifically public standards. Such standards play an increasingly important role in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on adoption of certified management standards, specifically public standards. Such standards play an increasingly important role in today’s business environment. However, to generate adoption benefits, they must be first widely accepted – a situation where they have become viewed as the de facto norms. For this state to occur early adopters play a critical role. Past research has argued that early adopters, in exchange for assuming more risk, are rewarded with higher economic returns. Yet, these findings are based on private, not public standards. With public standards, early adopters do not receive such benefits. There is evidence that public standards are becoming more important. This situation leads to a simple but important question addressed in this study – if early adopters assume the risks of embracing a new public standard without economic benefits, then what is their motivation? To resolve this question, this study draws on agency theory and prospect theory. The authors argue that early adopters embrace such standards because of their desire to minimize risk resulting from failure to support the goal at the heart of the public standards.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from the Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) Partners Cost Benefit Survey and analyzed through structural equation modeling.

Findings

Early adopters of public standards are not driven by economic benefits but rather by the need to minimize their exposure to the risks associated with failing to satisfy the goals associated with a public standard. In other words, they were motivated by the need to minimize costs. In the case of C-TPAT, these costs are those of failing to provide or improve network security.

Research limitations/implications

This study has shed new light on the standards adoption process by clarifying the specific motivations that drive early adoption of a public standard. In addition to identifying the loss aversion motives of early adopters and economic benefit motives of later adopters, the authors have also elaborated on the notion that standards have differing levels of precedence, particularly when comparing private with public standards.

Practical implications

In a world characterized by increasing demands for outcomes such as improved security and where governmental funding is falling, due to growing deficits and governments that are becoming more conservative, the authors expect the use of public standards to increase.

Originality/value

Different from prior research on private standard, the paper focuses on the organizations involved in the adoption and diffusion of a public standard, with special attention being devoted to the early adopters. The paper provides a theoretical explanation for the actions of early adopters of a public standard through the theoretical lens of prospect theory.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Norman Desmarais

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2016

Frederick Betz

Abstract

Details

Strategic Thinking
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-466-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1932

BEGINNING with our July issue, which is the first Number of Volume XXXV, we have decided to change the format of The Library World and enlarge the size of the page. It is…

Abstract

BEGINNING with our July issue, which is the first Number of Volume XXXV, we have decided to change the format of The Library World and enlarge the size of the page. It is hoped by this means to give increased reading matter and to be of greater service to the Profession. We are proud of the fact that The Library World has been published continuously since 1898, and that during this long record our policy has been one of continued progress.

Details

New Library World, vol. 34 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Wendelin M. Küpers

The purpose of this paper is to describe how a phenomenological approach can help to understand embodied dimensions and compare different and shared qualities, functions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how a phenomenological approach can help to understand embodied dimensions and compare different and shared qualities, functions and potential, as well as ambivalences and limitations of metaphors and stories in organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a phenomenological understanding and use of multiple discourses, the specific expressive and communicative nature, linkages to meaning, mediation and integration, as well as transformational, innovating and generating potentials of metaphors respectively, narratives are analysed conceptually and discussed. Accordingly similarities and differences, overlapping and conflicting patterns, thus correspondences and rapprochements of both metaphors and narratives are shown and illustrated.

Findings

The critical comparison of various, especially transformative functions, ambivalences and ambiguous uses of metaphorical and narrative sides and practices reveals their inherently dynamic inter‐relational nexus. The analysis shows how metaphors and stories/narratives can serve each other, as well as how they work together and contribute for transformation in organizations. In turn, this also offers new potential for understanding the practical opportunities and obstacles to the management of change.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in that besides using multiple discourse, it follows an advanced Merleau‐Pontyian phenomenological approach and thus considers embodied dimensions of metaphors and stories/narratives and its implication for organizations critically. Working out the intriguing relationship between metaphor and narrative offers significant new insight and avenues for the research of organizational inertia and change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

M.J. Meldrum

Although the marketing of high technology has attracted a number ofwriters over the 1980s and 1990s, there is, as yet, no shared agreementas to the critical issues…

Abstract

Although the marketing of high technology has attracted a number of writers over the 1980s and 1990s, there is, as yet, no shared agreement as to the critical issues marketing managers must address to be successful in this area. Based on observation and experience, suggests a framework of six emerging themes which regularly appear when examining marketing in the high‐technology arena and which are closely – related to the key characteristics of high‐tech products. Each of the themes identified has implications for the marketing task facing marketing managers of high‐tech products – they reinforce the need to address both internal and external marketing issues and the importance of further research to develop paradigms appropriate to successful commercial activities in high‐technology industries. Includes the “softer” problems of technology seduction and the usefulness of concepts such as the technology life cycle, and also covers the need to focus on credibility, standards, positioning and infrastructure, all of which impact on the way marketing managers will orchestrate the marketing mix. The themes in no way replace standard marketing approaches, but do provide a background for the formulation of marketing strategy and a basis for further development in this area.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 29 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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