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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1944

William S. Murray

IT is particularly appropriate to discuss Indium at a meeting of the Institute of the Aeronautical Sciences for it is in the aviation industry that Indium has received its…

Abstract

IT is particularly appropriate to discuss Indium at a meeting of the Institute of the Aeronautical Sciences for it is in the aviation industry that Indium has received its greatest acclaim and has contributed so materially to the perfection of vital war machines. Indium in aviation is a reality and has long since passed the experimental stage and has become a vital factor in both power plants and airscrews.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 16 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1944

Alexander Klemin

IT was very gratifying to see that in spile of the pressure of the times and the difficulties of travel, the Twelfth Annual Meeting of the Institute was as well attended…

Abstract

IT was very gratifying to see that in spile of the pressure of the times and the difficulties of travel, the Twelfth Annual Meeting of the Institute was as well attended as ever with as wide a representation as in previous years. Nor was there any lack of excellent papers, although, of course, it was perfectly clear that some of the very best development work in aerodynamics, power plant, and similar fields could not be discussed because of military restrictions. Note‐worthy was the perfectly tremendous attendance at the rotating wing aircraft session at which, after some excellent papers, films were shown of the Piasecki, Sikorsky and Bell helicopters. This session was so. crowded that the audience had to be moved to another hall where standing in the aisles could be avoided. This is another confirmation of the importance which is attached to helicopter development by American aeronautical engineers.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1962

R.D. MACLEOD

William Blackwood, the founder of the firm of the name, saw service in Edinburgh, Glasgow, and London before opening in 1804 as a bookseller at 64 South Bridge, Edinburgh…

Abstract

William Blackwood, the founder of the firm of the name, saw service in Edinburgh, Glasgow, and London before opening in 1804 as a bookseller at 64 South Bridge, Edinburgh. Blackwood continued in his bookselling capacity for a number of years, and his shop became a haunt of the literati, rivalling Constable's in reputation and in popularity. His first success as a publisher was in 1811, when he brought out Kerr's Voyages, an ambitious item, and followed shortly after by The Life of Knox by McCrie. About this time he became agent in Edinburgh for John Murray, and the two firms did some useful collaborating. Blackwood was responsible for suggesting alterations in The Black Dwarf, which drew from Scott that vigorous letter addressed to James Ballantyne which reads: “Dear James,—I have received Blackwood's impudent letter. G ‐ d ‐ his soul, tell him and his coadjutor that I belong to the Black Hussars of Literature, who neither give nor receive criticism. I'll be cursed but this is the most impudent proposal that was ever made”. Regarding this story Messrs. Blackwood say: “This gives a slightly wrong impression. Scott was still incognito. William Blackwood was within his rights. He was always most loyal to Scott.” There has been some controversy as to the exact style of this letter, and it has been alleged that Lockhart did not print it in the same terms as Sir Walter wrote it. Blackwood came into the limelight as a publisher when he started the Edinburgh Monthly Magazine in 1817, which was to be a sort of Tory counterblast to the Whiggish Edinburgh Review. He appointed as editors James Cleghorn and Thomas Pringle, who later said that they realised very soon that Blackwood was much too overbearing a man to serve in harness, and after a time they retired to edit Constable's Scots Magazine, which came out under the new name of The Edinburgh Magazine and Literary Miscellany. [Messrs. Blackwood report as follows: “No. They were sacked—for incompetence and general dulness. (See the Chaldee Manuscript.) They were in office for six months only.”] Blackwood changed the name of The Edinburgh Magazine to Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, and became his own editor, with able henchmen in John Wilson, Christopher North, John Gibson Lockhart, and James Hogg as contributors. It was a swashbuckling magazine, sometimes foul in attack, as when it told John Keats to get “back to the shop, back to plaster, pills, and ointment boxes”. Lockhart had a vigour of invective such as was quite in keeping with the age of Leigh Hunt, an age of hard‐hitting. The history of Blackwood in those days is largely the history of the magazine, though Blackwood was at the same time doing useful publishing work. He lost the Murray connexion, however, owing to the scandalous nature of some of the contributions published in Maga; these but expressed the spirit of the times. John Murray was scared of Blackwood's Scottish independence! Among the book publications of Blackwood at the period we find Schlegel's History of Literature, and his firm, as we know, became publisher for John Galt, George Eliot, D. M. Moir, Lockhart, Aytoun, Christopher North, Pollok, Hogg, De Quincey, Michael Scott, Alison, Bulwer Lytton, Andrew Lang, Charles Lever, Saintsbury, Charles Whibley, John Buchan, Joseph Conrad, Neil Munro—a distinguished gallery. In 1942 the firm presented to the National Library of Scotland all the letters that had been addressed to the firm from its foundation from 1804 to the end of 1900, and these have now been indexed and arranged, and have been on display at the National Library where they have served to indicate the considerable service the firm has given to authorship. The collection is valuable and wide‐ranging.

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Library Review, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Book part
Publication date: 23 December 2010

Noel W. Thompson

Joseph Dorfman in his introduction to the 1966 edition of Ravenstone's A Few Doubts on the Subjects of Population and Political Economy argued that Ravenstone was Rev…

Abstract

Joseph Dorfman in his introduction to the 1966 edition of Ravenstone's A Few Doubts on the Subjects of Population and Political Economy argued that Ravenstone was Rev. Edward Edwards, a major contributor on political economy to the Quarterly Review and Blackwood's Magazine. The case Dorfman made was circumstantial but nonetheless a strong one. First there was the fact that ‘articles in these Tory organs [were] roughly speaking in accordance with the views of “Ravenstone”’ (Dorfman, 1966). Both Ravenstone and Edwards were, for example, strongly critical of Malthusian population theory and its implications. Furthermore, on the basis of a reading of the 1821 work, Dorfman opined that Ravenstone was a trained theologian, something consistent with Edwards' clerical status, and that both had a predilection for historical reflection. Dorfman also believed he had found evidence in the files of John Murray, the publisher of the Quarterly Review, to substantiate his identification. Thus he cites a letter from Murray to William Gifford, a member of the publishing house, dated 3 November 1820, which makes reference to a manuscript sent to Murray shortly before A Few Doubts was published by another house. Moreover, Murray's correspondence files show that Edwards thought highly of Henry Brougham, and there is a copy of A Few Doubts in the Goldsmiths' Library in London, which is inscribed from the author to him (Dorfman, 1966, p. 20).

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English, Irish and Subversives among the Dismal Scientists
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-061-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1906

EVERY librarian in his inmost heart dislikes newspapers. He regards them as bad literature; attractors of undesirable readers; a drain upon the limited resources of the…

Abstract

EVERY librarian in his inmost heart dislikes newspapers. He regards them as bad literature; attractors of undesirable readers; a drain upon the limited resources of the library; and a target against which the detractors of public libraries are constantly battering. From the standpoint of the librarian, newspapers are the most expensive and least productive articles stocked by a library, and their lavish provision is, perhaps, the most costly method of purchasing waste‐paper ever devised. Pressure of circumstances and local conditions combine, however, to muzzle the average librarian, and the consequence is that a perfectly honest and outspoken discussion of the newspaper question is very rarely seen. In these circumstances, an attempt to marshal the arguments for and against the newspaper, together with some account of a successful practical experiment at limitation, may prove interesting to readers of this magazine.

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New Library World, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1906

IT is fitting that a new series of this magazine should be introduced by some reflections on the whole question of book selection, both for the general public and libraries.

Abstract

IT is fitting that a new series of this magazine should be introduced by some reflections on the whole question of book selection, both for the general public and libraries.

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New Library World, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Ronald H. Fritze

The Oxford English Dictionary (hereafter referred to as the OED) is one of the most well‐known and respected reference works in the world. Its imposing bulk has even led…

Abstract

The Oxford English Dictionary (hereafter referred to as the OED) is one of the most well‐known and respected reference works in the world. Its imposing bulk has even led some people to believe incorrectly that it actually lists every word in the English language. Of course, a good number of words were omitted from the distinguished dictionary because they were considered vulgar or because they were American words, categories that were actually somewhat synonymous to certain less tolerant Englishmen of the late nineteenth century.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Lorna Collins, Barbara Murray and Ken McCracken

This paper is a conversation piece which highlights the ways in which succession planning in large company might be handled. The discussion focuses on Christopher Oughtred…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a conversation piece which highlights the ways in which succession planning in large company might be handled. The discussion focuses on Christopher Oughtred the former Chairman of William Jackson Food Group, one of the largest family businesses in the UK. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a conversation with a panel of leading family business experts and a family business owner. The paper presents latest thoughts on family business research, insights into a real family business succession project and reflections from a former Chairman on the succession process.

Findings

Findings highlight possible stages and requirements of a successful transition and succession plan. Also suggestions for areas of further research are presented.

Originality/value

The conversation recorded in this paper represents a rare opportunity to obtain reflections and insights on a succession process and how it was managed in a large family business. The conversation also highlights the kinds of challenges often experienced by family businesses during transition and succession. As a case study this is an exemplar of how succession might be planned.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Peter Hoare

The Librarians of Glasgow University since 1641 are identified, andtheir periods of office summarised and assessed as far as informationallows. The terms of appointment in…

Abstract

The Librarians of Glasgow University since 1641 are identified, and their periods of office summarised and assessed as far as information allows. The terms of appointment in early years and pattern of town and university alternating nominations are outlined, and the gradual development of the post into that of a professional librarian in the twentieth century is illustrated.

Details

Library Review, vol. 40 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

William C. Murray, Statia Elliot, Keith Simmonds, Donnalea Madeley and Martin Taller

This paper aims to explore the challenges encountered by the hospitality and tourism industry in managing the labour challenges it faces presently and will face in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the challenges encountered by the hospitality and tourism industry in managing the labour challenges it faces presently and will face in the coming years. Although there are several issues at play, there are actions that industry members can take both internally and by advocating externally for change.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on insights from three industry members and two academics to explore key areas in which action can be taken to address labour demand challenges in the hospitality and tourism workforce. The identified action items combine these various types of expertise to provide a holistic frame of action.

Findings

The Canadian hospitality and tourism industry is facing an ever-increasing labour demand shortage. Industry members can confront this on multiple fronts, from front-line employee satisfaction to more regional and national advocacy efforts. A combination of activities is recommended.

Practical implications

Hospitality and tourism industry members can take numerous actions from this analysis, including developing stronger organization cultures that align with employee needs, exerting effort in balancing wage gap issues and maintaining pressure on government partners to provide support for establishing hospitality and tourism, so that it is viewed as a valuable career path.

Originality/value

This paper increases knowledge in the hospitality and tourism field by combining the current human resource management theory with observations from industry experts on the needs that exist now and are predicted in the coming years.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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