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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Chad R. Allred, Scott M. Smith and William R. Swinyard

To classify internet users into holiday shopper and non‐shopper segments, and to profile the demographic, psychographic, and computer use characteristics of each segment.

10784

Abstract

Purpose

To classify internet users into holiday shopper and non‐shopper segments, and to profile the demographic, psychographic, and computer use characteristics of each segment.

Design/methodology/approach

Self‐report data come from a national US sample of online internet users. Segments are customer revealed using traditional cluster analysis. Lifestyle measures are reduced to higher order measures using factor analysis. Profiles are analyzed via descriptive statistics, graphs, and radar charts.

Findings

Six important segments are identified in the data. Three of the segments characterize customers who resist online shopping, even though they engage in other online activities. Security fears and technological incompetence typically inhibit these users from engaging in electronic exchange. Some internet users simply choose not to shop online. Three of the segments describe active e‐shoppers who are driven by a unique desire to socialize, minimize inconvenience, and maximize value.

Research limitations/implications

Data come from self‐report questionnaires administered and collected electronically through the internet. Focus is placed on holiday gift buying. Since, holiday shopping is very important to e‐retailers, results are managerially interesting, but might not be indicative of other shopping periods.

Practical implications

To be successful, e‐retailers must understand those things that motivate and inhibit customer online shopping. Marketing activities targeted at reticent e‐shoppers should focus on benefits, guarantee safeguards and facilitate technical literacy. Service, value, and online ambiance should be carefully tailored to meet the desires and expectations of each customer type.

Originality/value

The study is a replication and extension of earlier online studies which are summarized in the reviewed literature.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 34 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

William R. Swinyard and Cheng Peng Sim

While several studies have examined the roles of husbands and wives in making decisions about products, few have examined the impact of children. This article reports the…

1461

Abstract

While several studies have examined the roles of husbands and wives in making decisions about products, few have examined the impact of children. This article reports the results of a 1985 study of the influence of children on families. The study examines children's influence in each of four stages of the purchase decision, for 25 products, and by age of the children. For child‐centered (e.g., toys, children's clothing, food) and child‐used products or services (e.g., vacations, restaurant choices, outside entertainment), the study shows that children are perceived as influential by most households. Older children are perceived as more influential than younger children for nearly all the products studied. The study concludes that “family” decision making is quite different from “husband‐wife” decision making.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

William R. Swinyard and Leow Ger Ghee

ATM cardholders and nonholders in the Republic of Singapore have been researched. Cardholders and nonholders are contrasted in their demographic, attitudinal and social…

Abstract

ATM cardholders and nonholders in the Republic of Singapore have been researched. Cardholders and nonholders are contrasted in their demographic, attitudinal and social characteristics and in their experience with technical products. The findings indicate considerable differences between cardholders and nonholders on most measures. Further, the profile of ATM cardholders appears to be consistent with Rogers' (1983) generalisation of the early adopters of innovations.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

William R. Swinyard

During the past decade significant changes have been occurring in the US retail market. Among the principal changes are those in competition, consumers, technology and the…

5593

Abstract

During the past decade significant changes have been occurring in the US retail market. Among the principal changes are those in competition, consumers, technology and the economy. Changes in these areas are reflected in trends in retail practice. Reviews the underlying changes that have been occurring along with their corresponding retailing trends, which include micromarketing, globalization, new retail formats, quick response and ethnic retailing.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Foo Nin Ho and Mark Patrick Gallagher

The purpose of this project was to explore and identify factors that influence a consumer to purchase wine during an afternoon of product sampling (wine tasting). A panel…

Abstract

The purpose of this project was to explore and identify factors that influence a consumer to purchase wine during an afternoon of product sampling (wine tasting). A panel of consumers was recruited for an afternoon of wine tasting at vineyards in Napa, California. Several potential hedonistic, utilitarian and logistical factors (i.e. winery facilities, quality of the wine and order in which the winery was visited) were measured using a journal log that was maintained by participants following the tasting experience for a period of one‐month. The conclusions drawn from this study were that group size, confidence in one's ability to purchase wine and overall assessment of a vineyard's wine portfolio were more important than the hedonistic factors in terms of inducing a sale immediately following a taste.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Shwu‐Ing Wu

States that the level of consumer involvement in a product category is a major variable relevant to advertising strategy. Suggests product category is often segmented by…

7325

Abstract

States that the level of consumer involvement in a product category is a major variable relevant to advertising strategy. Suggests product category is often segmented by the level of consumer involvement; however, consumers are rarely segmented. Points out that different involvement clusters have different responses to advertising effectiveness for the same product. Presents a case study segmenting a market using the consumer involvement degree, exploring the characteristics in order to determine the relationship between advertising effectiveness and the level of consumer involvement. Shows results suggesting that a high degree of consumer involvement directed a high advertising effect and is therefore an important indication for advertising strategy.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

John H. Antil

Models of the new product adoption process have traditionally assumed that consumers move directly from product trial to adoption. Such an assumption essentially equates…

Abstract

Models of the new product adoption process have traditionally assumed that consumers move directly from product trial to adoption. Such an assumption essentially equates product purchase with adoption. Is it advisable for the manager to assume that consumers who purchase a new product for the first time are adopters of the innovation? This article argues that viewing the adoption process in this manner not only may be misleading, but could be incorrect. It is proposed that the addition of two variables — direct product experience and product evaluation—between trial and adoption will more accurately reflect the consumer's new product decision process. Empirical results from an energy‐related innovation provide support for the suggested modifications.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

C. Whan Park, Henry Assael and Seoil Chaiy

A high level of product involvement is typically assumed to accompany higher information search, a fewer number of acceptable alternatives, and a higher number of choice…

Abstract

A high level of product involvement is typically assumed to accompany higher information search, a fewer number of acceptable alternatives, and a higher number of choice criteria than does low level of product involvement. Inferring the level of product involvement from these behavioral or evaluative characteristics is, however, potentially misleading. Two factors are identified as mediating the relationship between the high level of involvement and these characteristics: (1) product trial, and (2) the consumer learning stage. The results of the present study support this view. Even for high involving products, considerable variations exist in these characteristics, depending on product trialability and consumer learning stage. Several strategic marketing implications stemming from these results are offered.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

Gordon C. Bruner and Richard J. Pomazal

Since 1910, when John Dewey first introduced the five‐stage decision process, it has been a widely accepted concept and still serves as the central pillar of a popular…

4342

Abstract

Since 1910, when John Dewey first introduced the five‐stage decision process, it has been a widely accepted concept and still serves as the central pillar of a popular consumer behavior model. These stages are Problem Recognition, Information Search, Alternative Evaluation, Choice, and Outcomes. The importance of these stages is attested to by the considerable attention devoted to most of them in numerous textbooks and journal articles. Such attention, however, has not come to the Problem Recognition stage. While some texts provide hypothetical descriptions of this “trigger” of the decision process, theoretical discussion and empirical support are surprisingly lacking. Journal literature fares even worse, with articles on the topic almost non‐existent. Lack of information on the topic is even more ironic when one considers that a purchase cannot occur unless a problem is recognized! The purpose of this article is to provide a detailed explanation of the Problem Recognition process. The results of the few empirical studies that have been done will be examined. In addition, a proposed model of the Problem Recognition process is presented. The implications of this material will be discussed as it relates to marketing.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Rishi Chakravarty and Nripendra Narayan Sarma

The hierarchies of effects models have been perpetually updated across different time period. Ever since the evolution of the primary customer path indicated through the…

1482

Abstract

Purpose

The hierarchies of effects models have been perpetually updated across different time period. Ever since the evolution of the primary customer path indicated through the Attention, Interest, Desire, Action model in the 1900s, the hierarchical frameworks have witnessed a significant transformation in context to the present age of Web connectivity. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to understand the transformation in the hierarchy of effects models in the age of connectivity.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is conceptual in nature and an attempt to provide an overall view of the shifting dimension in the customer path as indicated in the various hierarchies of effects models since evolution up to the age of digitalisation.

Findings

It is observed that in the age of connectivity customer loyalty is expressed in terms of brand advocacy rather than repurchase, and that the customer path has been redefined. This seems pertinent because of the swift exchange of information that occurs among the online customer communities.

Originality/value

This paper identifies a need to provide a contemporary outlook to the customer path in the age of internet connectivity.

Details

Vilakshan - XIMB Journal of Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0973-1954

Keywords

1 – 10 of 34