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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Reece Allen, Erin Parrish, Nancy L. Cassill, William Oxenham and Michelle R. Jones

Companies are pursuing niche markets to combat competitive pressures from low-cost producers of textiles and apparel. These small, customer-need centered markets provide…

Abstract

Companies are pursuing niche markets to combat competitive pressures from low-cost producers of textiles and apparel. These small, customer-need centered markets provide economic competitiveness opportunities through increased market share and profitability (Parrish, 2003).

To further understand niche marketing strategies and expand the Parrish Niche Strategy Model (2003), competitive analyses are conducted using secondary data. The analyses covered companies in each sector (fiber/yarn, textile, apparel, and retail) of the supply chain.

The purpose of the analyses is to understand competitive positions and strategies of companies competing with niche products in the bottomweight market. This market is chosen because it represents a significant consumption market in the United States where domestic textile manufacturers still have a presence. The results indicate that growth rates are higher for downstream companies, although a larger number of upstream companies are privately held. Companies in all sectors of the supply chain are found to be utilizing supply chain and brand management strategies.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2005

Yiyun Cai and William Oxenham

High-speed airflow is widely used in many processes in the textile industry. Even though the interactions between fibers and airflows have attracted many researchers'…

Abstract

High-speed airflow is widely used in many processes in the textile industry. Even though the interactions between fibers and airflows have attracted many researchers' interest, there have been few published studies that focus on the computer modeling of fiber motion in airflow fields. This research was aimed at developing a model that can effectively simulate the interactions between fibers and airflows, thus providing a clearer understanding of the behavior of textile fibers in certain processing machines.

A three-dimensional model of the aerodynamic component of a rotor spinning machine was established. A commercial computation fluid dynamics (CFD) software package was used to compute the airflow field of this model and the results were analyzed to study the airflow field's characteristics. Resultant data were used as input for the fiber movement model by using a one-way coupling method. A mathematical model of fiber movement was developed, including numerical methods and visualization programs that were used to solve the model and illustrate fiber movements. The results obtained were studied and compared under different initial and boundary conditions.

This research successfully demonstrates the effectiveness of computer modeling for studying the fiber motion in high-speed airflow. It provides a better understanding of fiber behavior in airflow fields and its potential and prospect in the research of textile processes, in which airflow plays an important role, are very promising.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Matt Berdine, Erin Parrish, Nancy L. Cassill, William Oxenham and Michelle R. Jones

Due to the highly competitive nature of an increasingly global market, textile and apparel firms are being challenged to leverage and enhance their core competencies in…

Abstract

Due to the highly competitive nature of an increasingly global market, textile and apparel firms are being challenged to leverage and enhance their core competencies in order to maintain and potentially increase market share. A strategy being explored is increasing supply chain efficiencies with the goal of reducing costs and improving customer service levels. This research seeks to explore such supply chain strategies which are currently being used into addition to the product costing and outsourcing decision analysis. Executives within the fiber and yarn, textile, apparel and retail industries are quantitatively and qualitatively interviewed in order to examine these issues.

Results show that firms are using a blended sourcing strategy in order to minimize risk and leverage manufacturing capabilities. Quality, cost and reliability of delivery are all indicated as important in terms of sourcing criteria. The results provide insight into the decision process and a framework for increasing efficiency resulting in increased international competitiveness.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Minyoung Suh, Katherine E. Carroll, Edward Grant and William Oxenham

This research investigated the feasibility of using an inductively coupled antenna as the basis of applying a systems approach to smart clothing. In order to simulate…

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigated the feasibility of using an inductively coupled antenna as the basis of applying a systems approach to smart clothing. In order to simulate real-life situations, the impact of the distortions and relative displacement of different fabric layers (with affixed antennas) on the signal quality was assessed. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A spiral antenna was printed on different fabric substrates. Obstructive conditions of the inductively coupled fabric layers were investigated to find out how much influence these conditions had on transmission performance. Reflected signals and transmitted signals were observed, while fabric antennas were subjected to displacement (distance and dislocation) or deformation (stretching and bending). The threshold of physical obstacles was estimated based on statistical analyses.

Findings

The limits of physical conditions that enable proper wireless transmission were estimated up to ∼2 cm for both distance and dislocation, and ∼0.24 K for bending deformation. The antenna performance remained within an acceptable level of 20 percent transmission up to 10 percent fabric stretch. Based on well-established performance metrics used in clothing environment on the body, which employs 2-5 cm of ease, the results imply that the inductively coupled antennas may be suitable for use in smart clothing.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates that the use of inductively coupled antennas on multiple clothing layers could offer the basis of a new “wireless” system approach to smart clothing. This would not only result in performance benefits, but would also significantly improve the aesthetics of smart clothing which should result in new markets for such products.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Erin D. Parrish, Nancy L. Cassill and William Oxenham

To examine how companies in the maturity stage of the product life cycle can implement and maintain a successful niche market strategy to increase competitiveness in the…

Abstract

Purpose

To examine how companies in the maturity stage of the product life cycle can implement and maintain a successful niche market strategy to increase competitiveness in the face of new competition, with particular reference to the global textile industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Responsible executives in eight firms in the textile and apparel/clothing sector in the USA were interviewed face‐to‐face or by telephone, or completed an online questionnaire. The sample contains leaders in the industry.

Findings

Research results suggest that niche marketing is an effective strategy for countering price competition in a mature industry and can use a niche market strategy. They identify key success factors, the most important factor of which was found to be a thorough understanding of the targeted consumers. It is concluded that the marketing mix plays a more important part than is generally suggested in the literature, by communicating non‐price product attributes to the niche market.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample limits generalization beyond the companies that participated in the study and comparable firms in the US textile and apparel/clothing industry.

Practical implications

This research study shows, within its limitations, that niche marketing is a promising global competitive strategy for mature industries. The study proposes practical guidelines for putting it into practice.

Originality/value

This study generally confirms the literature, but comes to some original further conclusions.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Erin D. Parrish, Nancy L. Cassill and William Oxenham

The purpose of this study is to examine how the textile and apparel industry can utilize a niche market strategy in order to compete with lower priced imports.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how the textile and apparel industry can utilize a niche market strategy in order to compete with lower priced imports.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design used for this study was an in‐depth case study method. The sample consisted of selected companies from the fiber, textile, apparel, and auxiliary sectors who are considered leaders in the US textile and apparel industry.

Findings

Results indicated that firms can approach a niche strategy from either a market or a product perspective. Findings also indicated variables that are used by firms for both approaches. The most important factor in which a firm needs to focus is understanding the consumer.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the limited sample size of US textile and apparel firms, the results can only be generalized to those companies that participated in the study and not the entire textile and apparel industry.

Practical implications

This research study showed that a niche strategy is a promising global competitive strategy for the textile and apparel industry that can be used to compete with lower priced imports.

Originality/value

This study clarifies not only how a niche market/product is defined by the industry, but also how firms can implement and maintain a successful niche strategy.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Erin Dodd Parrish, Nancy L. Cassill and William Oxenham

With the present transient status of many countries’ economies, the international textile industry faces considerable challenges. There are many uncertainties surrounding…

Abstract

With the present transient status of many countries’ economies, the international textile industry faces considerable challenges. There are many uncertainties surrounding the global textile market, exacerbated by the foreboding that in 2005, quotas will be eliminated, resulting in “free” trade flows. There is no doubt that manufacturers who have created niche markets will be better positioned to compete in the global marketplace and achieve higher margins for products while yielding greater profitability. This paper is an introduction of a larger study that will examine how niche market definitions are being recast, owing to changing global patterns. This paper addresses what role niche markets will play in 2005. Specific objectives are: to give a broad overview of various trade theories, including classical, neo‐classical, post‐neo‐classical, and modern, in order to determine what, theoretically, the future holds for the US textile and apparel industry. Specifically, focus will be given to the issue of specialization as a result of trade; to explain how the specialization advocated by trade economists relates to niche markets in the US textile and apparel industry; to illustrate how traditional marketing methods differ from niche marketing; and to examine what role niche markets will play in the US textile and apparel industry in 2005. The results of this research study will aid in the formulation of a business strategy that can by utilized to capitalize on niche markets and will provide a research framework for global textile researchers.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Abstract

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

David Pickton

Abstract

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1943

“BEFORE the leaves of Autumn fall” we were assured by Mr. Churchill that there might be heavy fighting. They have not fallen yet, although with September, beautiful as it…

Abstract

“BEFORE the leaves of Autumn fall” we were assured by Mr. Churchill that there might be heavy fighting. They have not fallen yet, although with September, beautiful as it often is, we know the Summer is over and our minds must be occupied most immediately with the war. Libraries may seem to some, even librarians, secondary in this maelstrom but, even if they are, that secondariness is really so important that at this month everyone looks to his own work to see in what ways it may be geared up more fully for its own special contribution. Immediate planning concerns such matters as winter service hours, staffing, the growing wear and tear on stocks, the inadequacy of new book supply, the growing shabbiness of our buildings and our continuing inability to carry on the extension work which was so prominent a feature of many libraries. Frankly, in most towns we are giving a book service, not doing the library work, personal and bibliographical, which every librarian desires to give. To do what is within our limits to the best advantage is, then, the immediate problem.

Details

New Library World, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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