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Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Sandy Bond, William N. Kinnard, Elaine M. Worzala and Steven D. Kapplin

While numerous studies have been carried out in the US to determine the character and scope of the effects of contaminated, threatened or “stigmatized” properties on the…

Abstract

While numerous studies have been carried out in the US to determine the character and scope of the effects of contaminated, threatened or “stigmatized” properties on the terms and availability of debt financing, little appears in the published literature dealing with the attitudes, policies and requirements of equity investors. Hence, the extent of opposition from both institutional lenders and equity investors toward contaminated property is still uncertain. This paper summarises the results of parallel studies undertaken within New Zealand (NZ) and the USA to answer the question of how those who lend on, and invest in, property affected or impacted by contamination perceive the risks associated with this type of investment and evaluate its impacts. Of particular interest are the perceived effects of on‐site contamination on property investment and its financing.

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Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

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Abstract

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Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

William N. Kinnard, Margarita M. Lenk and Elaine M. Worzala

Documents evidence of a loss of independence in the commercial appraisal industry in the USA. Utilizes a survey methodology to elicit the reactions of commercial…

Abstract

Documents evidence of a loss of independence in the commercial appraisal industry in the USA. Utilizes a survey methodology to elicit the reactions of commercial appraisers to controlled scenarios of client pressure. This methodology was borrowed from established behavioural research that tested independent auditors for related independence agency issues. Results indicate significant valuation effects related to the amount of business a client brings to the appraisal firm, but no significant effect related to the size of the client‐requested value adjustment, or to the interaction of the amount of client business and the size of the requested value adjustment. Suggests that changes in fee structures and institutional reforms may be necessary to resolve the loss of independence.

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Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Kerry D. Vandell

This paper aims to trace the evolution of the theory and practice of valuation of real estate interests. Using a historical perspective, especially in the context of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to trace the evolution of the theory and practice of valuation of real estate interests. Using a historical perspective, especially in the context of recent events, it identifies an emerging unification of thought and application that has important implications for the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies and synthesizes the contributory literature to the philosophical underpinnings of value theory and practice as applied to real estate. From pre‐history to the present, it traces classical concepts and the way these are related to the recent innovations in economic and financial valuation theory.

Findings

Recent contributions to value theory hold the promise of unifying and transforming the practice of real estate appraisal to one that is state‐of‐the‐art in terms of its contemporary relevance. However, numerous issues remain as obstacles, including insufficient recognition of the “real” nature (as opposed to “capital” nature) of real estate; a lag in educational standards to bring the profession up to date; an excessive reliance on models and data rather than judgment and common sense; and “silo‐ization” of specialties. Promising directions for future research are identified.

Originality/value

The task of valuation of interests in real property has taken on an increasingly important role, as the market for real estate has grown and become more liquid and complete. This paper provides a perspective on where it has come from and where it must go in the future in terms necessary changes in theory and practice to remain viable and relevant.

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Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

David Wyman, Maury Seldin and Elaine Worzala

The purpose of this exploratory paper is to examine the efficient market theories and to argue that a new paradigm or an expanded paradigm is needed for the valuation of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this exploratory paper is to examine the efficient market theories and to argue that a new paradigm or an expanded paradigm is needed for the valuation of real estate. This may actually not be a new paradigm but it may be necessary to go back in time to make the valuation models that are used more realistic and to try to include the realities that there are many diverse actors in the real estate marketplace and their actions are important and should not be assumed away. Behavior matters and the models for pricing real estate need to take this into account.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines some of the emerging models in other disciplines and works to relate them to the real estate marketplace in general but, more importantly, to help to explain the most recent bust of the global real estate markets.

Findings

The paper finds that there is a need to consider an alternative paradigm for the valuation of real estate and complexity theory as well as the adaptive system models that specifically take into account that the various actors in a real estate marketplace could be used to help better explain the emergent nature of real estate values.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to one's knowledge that argues for a shift in thinking to include complexity economics and agent‐based modeling as potential solutions to gain a better understanding of how real estate markets react.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 29 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Moses Munyami Kinatta, Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, John C. Munene, Isaac Nkote and Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga

This study examines the relationship between investor cognitive bias, investor intuitive attributes and investment decision quality in commercial real estate in Uganda.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the relationship between investor cognitive bias, investor intuitive attributes and investment decision quality in commercial real estate in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional research survey was used in this study, and data were collected from 200 investors of commercial real estate in Uganda using a structured questionnaire. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses derived under this study.

Findings

The results indicate that investor cognitive bias and investor intuitive attributes are positive and significant determinants of investment decision quality in commercial real estate. In addition, the two components of Investor cognitive bias (framing variation and cognitive heuristics) are positive and significant determinants of investment decision quality, whereas mental accounting is a negative and significant determinant of investment decision quality. For investor intuitive attributes, confidence degree and loss aversion are positive and significant determinants of investment decision quality, whereas herding behavior is a negative and significant determinant of investment decision quality in commercial real estate in Uganda.

Practical implications

For practitioners in commercial real estate sector should emphasize independent evaluation of investment opportunities (framing variation), simplify information regarding investments (Cognitive heuristics), believe in own abilities (Confidence degree), be risk averse (loss aversion) and avoid making decisions based on subjective visual mind (mental accounting) and group think/herding in order to make quality investment decisions. For policymakers, the study has illuminated factors such as provision of reliable information that ought to be taken into account when promulgating policies for regulation of the commercial real estate sector. This will help investors to come up with investment decisions which are plausible.

Originality/value

Few studies have focused on investor cognitive bias and investor intuitive attributes on investment decision quality in commercial real estate. This study is the first to examine the relationship, especially in the commercial real estate sector in a developing country like Uganda.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Rotimi Boluwatife Abidoye, Wei Huang, Abdul-Rasheed Amidu and Ashad Ali Javad

This study updates and extends the current work on the issue of accuracy of property valuation. The paper investigates the factors that contribute to property valuation…

Abstract

Purpose

This study updates and extends the current work on the issue of accuracy of property valuation. The paper investigates the factors that contribute to property valuation inaccuracy and examines different strategies to achieve greater accuracy in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

An online questionnaire was designed and administered on the Australian Property Institute (API) registered valuers, attempting to examine their perceptions on the current state of valuation accuracy in Australia. The variables/statements from responses are ranked overall and compared for differences by the characteristics of respondents.

Findings

Using mean rating point, the survey ranked three factors; inexperience valuers, the selection, interpretation and use of comparable evidence in property valuation exercise and the complexity of the subject property in terms of design, age, material specification and state of repairs as the most significant factors currently affecting valuation inaccuracy. The results of a Chi-square test did not, however, show a significant statistical relationship between respondents' profile and the perception on the comparative importance of the factors identified. Except for valuers' age and inexperience valuers and valuers' educational qualification and inexperience valuers and the selection, interpretation and use of comparable evidence in property valuation exercise. Also, the three highly ranked strategies for reducing the level of inaccuracy are: developing a global mindset, use of advanced methodology and training valuers on market forecasting skills.

Practical implications

In order for valuers to provide state-of-the-art service to the public and to remain relevant, there is a need to accurately and reliably estimate valuation figures. Hence, the strategies highlighted in this study could be considered in a bid to reduce property valuation inaccuracy in practice.

Originality/value

This study provides an updated overview of the issue of property valuation inaccuracy in the Australia valuation practice and examines the strategies to reduce it.

Details

Property Management, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Brano Glumac, Qi Han, Jos Smeets and Wim Schaefer

A brownfield site is well described by various definitions and the idea to redevelop it is supported by identifying numerous benefits for the society. Further, the…

Abstract

Purpose

A brownfield site is well described by various definitions and the idea to redevelop it is supported by identifying numerous benefits for the society. Further, the existing literature covers a broad range of different aspects of the brownfield redevelopment thus elaborating different features. At present, there is no overview of the brownfield features from the real estate development perspective focusing on the physical, legal and financial aspects of a site and property. This paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

At first, this paper contributes with the literature survey after which the features were structured according to the real estate development perspective. Additionally, the authors distinguish different expert groups and show the importance of keeping apart their aggregated opinions. Fuzzy Delphi technique is considered as an excellent method to gather such diverse panel data since it supports expert diversity in its procedure and calculation. Additionally, this method captures the uncertainty due to the human factor in valuation and thus improves the validity of the features quantification.

Findings

The survey was among the experts grouped by the specific goals and tasks. This paper presents the findings how the different expert groups value the brownfield features relevant for development potential and what they are.

Originality/value

The paper aims to contribute to the complex decision‐making process in brownfield redevelopment by identifying, structuring and rating the most relevant features of development potential. The authors introduced the method that highlights the importance of rigorous procedure for the panel data collection and advances the weighting of the features. This is of particular importance for the field of the real estate development appraisal since the present features or variables influence the future marketability and cost of a development. Missing these features seriously endangers the appraisal. A similar threat can influence any econometric model recently extensively used in policymaking.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

David Lorenz and Thomas Lützkendorf

The purpose of this paper is to explain the rationale for integrating sustainability issues into property valuation theory and practice and to provide initial suggestions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the rationale for integrating sustainability issues into property valuation theory and practice and to provide initial suggestions for valuers on how to account for sustainability issues within valuation reports.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors emphasise the key role of valuation professionals and of the valuation process itself in achieving a broader market penetration of sustainable construction. It is explained that, on the one hand, property valuation represents the major mechanism to align economic return with environmental and social performance of property assets, and thus to express and communicate the advantages and benefits of sustainable buildings. On the other hand, it is explained that gradual changes in market participants' perceptions in favour of sustainable buildings must be reflected within the property valuation and associated risk assessment process (otherwise valuers would produce misleading price estimates). The authors identify both the financial benefits and risk reduction potential of sustainable design as well as valuation input parameters that would allow these benefits to be reflected in property price estimates.

Findings

The authors show that the main reasons for immediately and rigorously integrating sustainability issues into property valuation are as follows: more sustainable patterns of behaviour are urgently necessary to sustain the viability of the Earth's ecosystems; a huge untapped market potential exists for sustainable property investment products and consulting services; sustainable buildings clearly outperform their conventional competitors in all relevant areas (i.e. environmentally, socially and financially); neglecting the benefits of sustainable design leads to distorted price estimates; and reflecting sustainability issues in property price estimates is already possible and the validity of this decision depends solely on the valuer's capability and sophistication to explain and justify his/her assumptions within the valuation report. However, it is also shown that efforts need to be undertaken to improve the description of property assets in transaction databases in order to provide the informational databases necessary to empirically underpin a valuer's decision to assign a “valuation bonus” to a sustainable building or a “valuation reduction” to an unsustainable/conventional one.

Originality/value

The paper postulates that valuation reports should be extended to include the following additional elements: a clear description of the availability of certain sustainability‐related property characteristics and attributes; a statement of the valuer's opinion about the benefits of these characteristics and attributes; and a statement of the valuer's opinion about the impact of these benefits and/or risks on property value.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

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