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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

William Kernan, Jane Bogart and Mary E. Wheat

The purpose of this paper is to report the perceived impact of various health concerns on the academic performance of health sciences graduate students.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the perceived impact of various health concerns on the academic performance of health sciences graduate students.

Design/methodology/approach

The American College Health Association's National College Health Assessment (ACHA‐NCHA), a 58‐item anonymous survey, was distributed to all graduate health science students during a five‐week period in the spring semester.

Findings

Students (n=1,355) were most likely to report a negative perceived academic impact related to psychosocial concerns such as stress, depression/anxiety, and relationship problems. The students' most pressing felt concerns were upper respiratory infections, stress, concerns about troubled loved ones and sleep difficulties. Clinical graduate students (n=712) were significantly more likely to report negative academic impacts related to upper respiratory infections (p=0.001), concern about a troubled friend or family member (p=0.001), sleep difficulties (p=0.005), relationship difficulties (p=0.030), and internet use/computer games (p=0.015) than non‐clinical graduate students. However, the magnitude of those differences was small.

Practical implications

This paper adds to one's knowledge of student health concerns, which may help to address health‐related barriers to learning.

Originality/value

This paper presents findings that further explicate the reciprocal relationship between student health and learning by suggesting methodology to identify priority health issues among a graduate student population. Findings from this study of over 20 different health concerns indicate that the priority health concerns of graduate health science students are primarily psychological and psychosocial health issues.

Details

Health Education, vol. 111 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1983

John A. Meenaghan

Argues that the general area of commercial sponsorship activity, while attracting increasing interest from marketing practitioners as an important strategic option in…

Abstract

Argues that the general area of commercial sponsorship activity, while attracting increasing interest from marketing practitioners as an important strategic option in marketing communications, has not been the subject of sufficiently rigorous and comprehensive investigation by theoreticians. States the purpose is to establish and consolidate the available body of knowledge combining an overview of the standard conceptual approaches to marketing communication with an examination of the recent academic research in sponsorship, while maintaining a focus on current marketplace practice. Argues for a coherent and structured approach to the management of sponsorship expenditure through the application of a ‘management by objectives’ approach. Parameters are established in terms of a working definition of sponsorship, a review of its commercial development and an overview of current activity. Develops a commercially ration framework within which sponsorship activity may be undertaken. Views objective‐setting as the cornerstone of sponsorship management and outlines a classification of sponsorship objectives that subsumes current practice clarifies the range of potential benefits. Examines the criteria that govern rational sponsorship selection and proposes an evaluation strategy based on stated criteria. Methods of evaluating effects of marketing communications (sponsorship particularly) are examined and new evaluation techniques are advanced to facilitate the implementation of this rigorous scientific approach.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Abstract

Details

Delivering Victory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-603-5

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2020

Malayka Klimchak, A.K. Ward Bartlett and William MacKenzie

The purpose of this study is to explore factors that help to determine employee trust in and affective commitment toward the organization.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore factors that help to determine employee trust in and affective commitment toward the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were collected using surveys administered to employees of a company located in the southeastern United States. The final sample included 391 matched supervisor–subordinate dyads.

Findings

We found organizational signals of trustworthiness led to affective commitment through increased levels of employee trust. Employees and supervisors who perceived HR professionals to be competent, who felt organizational information distributions were of high quality and who felt the organization disclosed relevant information exhibited higher levels of trust in the organization. Employees showed higher affective commitment when they trusted the organization. We found that supervisor trust directly impacted subordinate affective commitment as well.

Originality/value

These findings help extend signaling theory from the attraction of employees to their retention and help researchers and practitioners alike to understand the organizational trust- and commitment-building process.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Teresa J. Domzal and Jerome B. Kernan

The necessity to assess television programming as programming (rather than merely as a vehicle to deliver advertising audiences) is discussed against the background of…

Abstract

The necessity to assess television programming as programming (rather than merely as a vehicle to deliver advertising audiences) is discussed against the background of commercial television's rapidly changing technology, a principal effect of which has been to fragment formerly “mass” audiences. Traditional ratings data (because they lack adequate quantitative detail, contain no qualitative information, and measure programs only after they are aired) are becoming an insufficient basis for making either programming or advertising decisions. As audiences become increasingly segmented, the necessity to understand them (exactly who they are and why they watch particular programs) becomes apparent‐whether for purposes of developing programs, scheduling them, or ascertaining whether they constitute an efficient vehicle within which to place advertising messages. Audience understanding can come only from a considerably expanded base of systematic research.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part
Publication date: 6 November 2015

David Norman Smith

Max Weber called the maxim “Time is Money” the surest, simplest expression of the spirit of capitalism. Coined in 1748 by Benjamin Franklin, this modern proverb now has a…

Abstract

Purpose

Max Weber called the maxim “Time is Money” the surest, simplest expression of the spirit of capitalism. Coined in 1748 by Benjamin Franklin, this modern proverb now has a life of its own. In this paper, I examine the worldwide diffusion and sociocultural history of this paradigmatic expression. The intent is to explore the ways in which ideas of time and money appear in sedimented form in popular sayings.

Methodology/approach

My approach is sociological in orientation and multidisciplinary in method. Drawing upon the works of Max Weber, Antonio Gramsci, Wolfgang Mieder, and Dean Wolfe Manders, I explore the global spread of Ben Franklin’s famed adage in three ways: (1) via evidence from the field of “paremiology” – that is, the study of proverbs; (2) via online searches for the phrase “Time is Money” in 30-plus languages; and (3) via evidence from sociological and historical research.

Findings

The conviction that “Time is Money” has won global assent on an ever-expanding basis for more than 250 years now. In recent years, this phrase has reverberated to the far corners of the world in literally dozens of languages – above all, in the languages of Eastern Europe and East Asia.

Originality/value

Methodologically, this study unites several different ways of exploring the globalization of the capitalist spirit. The main substantive implication is that, as capitalism goes global, so too does the capitalist spirit. Evidence from popular sayings gives us a new foothold for insight into questions of this kind.

Details

Globalization, Critique and Social Theory: Diagnoses and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-247-4

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 June 2005

Orit Kamir

Anatomy of a Murder, a beloved, highly influential, seemingly liberal 1959 classic law-film seems to appropriate some of the fading western genre’s features and social…

Abstract

Anatomy of a Murder, a beloved, highly influential, seemingly liberal 1959 classic law-film seems to appropriate some of the fading western genre’s features and social functions, intertwining the professional-plot western formula with a hero-lawyer variation on the classic western hero character, America’s 19th century archetypal True Man. In so doing, Anatomy revives the western genre’s honor code, embracing it into the hero-lawyer law-film. Concurrently, it accommodates the development of cinematic imagery of the emerging, professional elite groups, offering the public the notion of the professional super-lawyer, integrating legal professionalism with natural justice. In the course of establishing its Herculean lawyer, the film constitutes its female protagonist as a potential threat, subjecting her to a cinematic judgment of her sexual character and reinforcing the honor-based notion of woman’s sexual-guilt.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-327-3

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Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2005

Abstract

Details

Beyond Small Numbers
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-562-9

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Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2015

Eda Sayin and Zeynep Gürhan-Canlı

We propose that brands with strong associations and dedicated customers may be vulnerable if customers perceive them as exploiting their relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

We propose that brands with strong associations and dedicated customers may be vulnerable if customers perceive them as exploiting their relationship.

Methodology/approach

We start by reviewing the literature on brand meaning, brand attachment, brand relationships, and brand transgressions. The extant literature implies that as a result of their willingness to sustain their brand relationship, highly attached consumers will either discount negative information about a brand or attribute the responsibility for the negative information to some external factors. We propose, on the other hand, that when negative information dilutes the reason for brand attachment, the norm of the consumer–brand relationship is violated (brand transgression). Then we argue that highly attached consumers of that brand will react more negatively (when compared to consumers not feeling highly attached) toward the brand.

Findings

We introduce a typology of brand transgressions against the (1) expressive, (2) exclusive, (3) expert, and (4) empathic nature of brands. We discuss the possible effects of attachment levels on consumers’ reactions after such brand transgressions. Additionally, we articulate the moderating effects of four consumer motives (need for self-enhancement, need for uniqueness, need for risk avoidance, and need for justice) on consumer reactions.

Originality/value

Our reasoning counters the literature suggesting that highly attached consumers of a brand will engage in relationship-sustaining behaviors. We contribute to the brand-transgression literature by providing a more structured and detailed definition of brand transgressions by classifying them under four distinct types.

Details

Brand Meaning Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-932-5

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Paul Sergius Koku

The study aims to examine consumer attitudes toward offshore-outsourcing of professional services in the USA. It focuses on the services of accountants, attorneys and…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine consumer attitudes toward offshore-outsourcing of professional services in the USA. It focuses on the services of accountants, attorneys and doctors to provide a framework for discussing policy and marketing implications.

Design/methodology/approach

The study reviews a review of the literature on consumer decision-making under uncertainty and attitude formation, and a focus group study to examine consumers’ attitudes toward offshore-outsourcing of professional services.

Findings

Contrary to reports in the popular press, this paper suggests that consumers do not have a generalized negative attitude toward offshore-outsourcing of all forms of professional services. While consumers do not mind offshore-outsourcings of the services of medical doctors and attorneys, they seem to be concerned about offshore-outsourcings of accounting or financial services. These results suggest that persons engaged in offshore-outsourcings of tax and other related services must re-strategize.

Research limitations/implications

While the results of this study offer a window into the US consumers’ feelings about offshore-outsourcings of professional services, the results lack generalizability, as they are based on an exploratory study.

Practical implications

Even though outsourcing has received a lot of media attention and some limited attention from academics, no study, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, has specifically investigated US consumers’ attitudes toward offshore-outsourcings of professional services. Given the fact that the trend is growing instead of abating, a study, such as the current one, that investigates how consumers feel about the practice is not only timely but will also provide valuable information to managers for strategy reformulation and to lawmakers for regulation purposes.

Originality/value

This paper, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, is the first to specifically examine consumer attitude toward offshoring of the basic professional services – the services of doctors, accountants and attorneys.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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