Search results

1 – 10 of 336
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Mauro Falasca, Scott Dellana, William J. Rowe and John F. Kros

This study develops and tests a model exploring the relationship between supply chain (SC) counterfeit risk management and performance in the healthcare supply chain (HCSC).

Abstract

Purpose

This study develops and tests a model exploring the relationship between supply chain (SC) counterfeit risk management and performance in the healthcare supply chain (HCSC).

Design/methodology/approach

In the proposed theoretical model, HCSC counterfeit risk management is characterized by HCSC counterfeit risk orientation (HCRO), HCSC counterfeit risk mitigation (HCRM) and HCSC risk management integration (HRMI), while performance is represented by healthcare logistics performance (HLP) and healthcare organization overall performance (HOP). Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) and survey data from 55 HCSC managers are used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

HCRO has a significant positive effect on HCRM, while HCRM has a positive impact on HRMI. With respect to HLP, HCRM has a nonsignificant effect, while HRMI has a significant impact, thus confirming the important mediating role of HRMI. Finally, HLP has a significant positive effect on the overall performance of healthcare organizations.

Research limitations/implications

All study participants were from the United States, limiting the generalizability of the study findings to different countries or regions. The sample size employed in the study did not allow the authors to distinguish among the different types of healthcare organizations.

Originality/value

This study delineates between a healthcare organization's philosophy toward counterfeiting risks vs actions taken to eliminate or reduce the impact of counterfeiting on the HCSC. By offering firm-level guidance for managers, this study informs healthcare organizations about addressing the challenge of counterfeiting in the HCSC.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Scott Dellana, John F. Kros, Mauro Falasca and William J. Rowe

The purpose of this paper is to explore the mediating effect of supply chain risk management integration (RMI) on the relationship between supply chain logistics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the mediating effect of supply chain risk management integration (RMI) on the relationship between supply chain logistics performance (LP) and supply chain cost performance (CP), as well as on the relationship between LP and supply chain service performance (SP). The impact of CP and SP on overall firm performance (FP) is also explored. ISO 9001-certified firms and non-certified firms are assessed to determine whether superior risk-based thinking, as required in the latest ISO 9001 standard, has a positive impact on the different relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model is developed and tested based on the participation of 140 supply chain managers. The proposed structural equation model positively relates LP, RMI, CP and SP. RMI is positively linked to CP and SP, while CP and SP are positively related to overall FP. Two subsamples (a group of 63 ISO 9001-certified firms and a group of 77 non-certified firms) are used to evaluate the model.

Findings

For certified and non-certified firms, LP is positively related to RMI, CP and SP, and SP and CP are positively related to FP. However, for certified firms, RMI partially mediates the relationship of LP with both CP and SP, while for non-certified firms, RMI does not mediate these relationships. The findings suggest that ISO 9001-certified firms are able to leverage RMI efforts to impact positively on supply chain performance, whereas non-certified firms are not.

Research limitations/implications

The study findings are based on the perceptions of managers. Even though the majority of the 63 certified firms included in this study were ISO 9001:2015 certified, the model results do not differentiate between companies certified to the 2008 version of the standard and the 2015 version (which specifically requires demonstration of risk-based thinking).

Practical implications

This study suggests that ISO 9001 provides a framework for risk management processes and collaboration with supply chain partners to positively impact the relationship of LP with cost and SP.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to characterize the benefits of using a structured approach for risk-based thinking that is associated with ISO 9001.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Scott Dellana, William J. Rowe and Ying Liao

The purpose of this research is to develop a validated general measure of supply chain risk management maturity (SCRMM) to assess organizational risk management maturity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to develop a validated general measure of supply chain risk management maturity (SCRMM) to assess organizational risk management maturity in the context of the supply chain (SC).

Design/methodology/approach

Dimensions and statements measuring SCRMM were developed through a literature review and consultation with experts. The instrument was refined through a pilot study and a full-scale study of 140 SC managers in the USA. A final SCRMM instrument, consisting of 25 statements, was obtained through scale purification, exploratory factor analysis, reliability analysis, and confirmatory factor analysis of construct validity. Cluster analysis was conducted to characterize the organizational groupings with respect to the instrument dimensions.

Findings

SCRMM was found to be comprised of the three main dimensions of SC Risk Management Orientation, Enterprise Risk Management Integration (ERMI), and SC Risk Collaboration. ERMI was found to be comprised of the three sub-dimensions of SC Risk Mitigation, Improvement of Risk Management Processes, and Organization Internal Risk Management. Cluster analysis revealed three groups characterized according to SCRMM as leaders, followers, and laggards.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on a sample in the USA, so the SCRMM scale may not generalize to supply chains in other countries or geographic regions.

Practical implications

The instrument provides a self-assessment and benchmark tool for businesses to advance their SC risk management through different stages of maturity.

Originality/value

This is a pioneering general instrument that treats risk management maturity of the organization in the context of the SC. Participants span many industries and SC positions.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Russell K. Lemken and William J. Rowe

This paper aims to examine how the efficacy of organizational routines varies and the mechanism through which organizational routines improve firm performance.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how the efficacy of organizational routines varies and the mechanism through which organizational routines improve firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model is proposed and tested using data from 53 interviews with financial services experts and 291 survey responses from financial advisors.

Findings

Operational and adaptive routines work through absorptive capacity to positively contribute to firm performance. The positive effects of adaptive routines are magnified under market governance.

Research limitations/implications

The examination of organizational routines is focused on routines at the firm level. Therefore, higher corporate-level routines were not measured. Response rate for the survey is a possible concern, so future research will benefit from increasing the response rate from the focal population.

Practical implications

This study benefits firms facing the dual role of customization and discipline in working with clients toward service delivery. The findings suggest that firms should develop both operational and adaptive routines, particularly when operating under market governance.

Originality/value

This study identified two categories of routines (operational and adaptive) and the circumstances in which the causal link between routines and performance varies. This study examined the potential moderating influence of a governance mode (market vs hierarchy). Absorptive capacity was identified as a mediator between the use of routines and firm performance.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 21 January 2020

John F. Kros, Mauro Falasca, Scott Dellana and William J. Rowe

The purpose of this paper is to adopt a contingency theory from a quality perspective to develop a model for assessing the impact of counterfeit prevention efforts on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to adopt a contingency theory from a quality perspective to develop a model for assessing the impact of counterfeit prevention efforts on supply chain (SC) performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the participation of 140 managers across ten industry sectors, a theoretical model is proposed and structural equation modeling is used to examine the relationships among SC risk management integration, SC counterfeit risk orientation (CRO), SC counterfeit risk mitigation (CRM), SC metric consistency (MC) and SC performance (service and cost benefits).

Findings

Findings suggest that firms with greater SC risk management integration have a stronger orientation toward counterfeit risk, greater maturity in CRM, more consistent SC metrics and better SC performance outcomes. CRO alone was not found to significantly improve SC MC.

Research limitations/implications

Results are based on managerial perceptions of SC counterfeit risk and performance metrics. Survey respondents were predominantly from the same country (the USA).

Practical implications

The paper represents a potential quality management framework for SC risk management, in the context of counterfeiting that includes a contingency perspective.

Originality/value

The study advances knowledge of how firms may address the challenging issue of counterfeiting in the SC. Empirical findings offer a firm-level quality management framework for managerial decision making in the context of counterfeiting.

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2016

John F. Kros and William J. Rowe

Business schools are tasked with matching curriculum to techniques that industry practitioners rely on for profitability. Forecasting is a significant part of what many…

Abstract

Business schools are tasked with matching curriculum to techniques that industry practitioners rely on for profitability. Forecasting is a significant part of what many firms use to try to predict budgets and to provide guidance as to the direction the business is headed. This chapter focuses on forecasting and how well business schools match the requirements of industry professionals. Considering its importance to achieving successful business outcomes, forecasting is increasingly becoming a more complex endeavor. Firms must be able to forecast accurately to gain an understanding of the direction the business is taking and to prevent potential setbacks before they occur. Our results suggest that, although techniques vary, in large part business schools are introducing students to the forecasting tools that graduates will need to be successful in an industry setting. The balance of our chapter explores the forecasting tools used by business schools and firms, and the challenge of aligning the software learning curve between business school curriculum and industry expectations.

Details

Advances in Business and Management Forecasting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-534-8

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2016

Abstract

Details

Advances in Business and Management Forecasting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-534-8

Abstract

Details

Contingent Valuation: A Critical Assessment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-860-5

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1899

The Food Bill has emerged from the Grand Committee on Trade, and will shortly be submitted, as amended, to the House of Commons. Whatever further amendments may be…

Abstract

The Food Bill has emerged from the Grand Committee on Trade, and will shortly be submitted, as amended, to the House of Commons. Whatever further amendments may be introduced, the Bill, when passed into law, will but afford one more example of the impotence of repressive legislation in regard to the production and distribution of adulterated and inferior products. We do not say that the making of such laws and their enforcement are not of the highest importance in the interests of the community; their administration—feeble and inadequate as it must necessarily be—produces a valuable deterrent effect, and tends to educate public opinion and to improve commercial morality. But we say that by the very nature of those laws their working can result only in the exposure of a small portion of that which is bad without affording any indications as to that which is good, and that it is by the Control System alone that the problem can be solved. This fact has been recognised abroad, and is rapidly being recognised here. The system of Permanent Analytical Control was under discussion at the International Congress of Applied Chemistry, held at Brussels in 1894, and at the International Congress of Hygiene at Budapest in 1895, and the facts and explanations put forward have resulted in the introduction of the system into various countries. The establishment of this system in any country must be regarded as the most practical and effective method of ensuring the supply of good and genuine articles, and affords the only means through which public confidence can be ensured.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 1 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Click here to view access options

Abstract

Details

Contingent Valuation: A Critical Assessment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-860-5

1 – 10 of 336