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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2022

William H. Bommer, Shailesh Rana and Emil Milevoj

This study aims to integrate extant research on eWallet adoption to better understand the key antecedents to eWallet use intention and examine whether the relationships…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to integrate extant research on eWallet adoption to better understand the key antecedents to eWallet use intention and examine whether the relationships differ across multiple moderators.

Design/methodology/approach

To integrate eWallet adoption findings, the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) and its extensions were utilized. Meta-analyses estimated the relationships between eWallet use intention and seven antecedents and the intercorrelations between antecedents. A total of 28 effects were calculated, utilizing 48 studies and 444 individual effect sizes, using 14,802 subjects. Using meta-analytically derived values, regression and relative weight analysis then determined each antecedent's relative utility. Furthermore, moderator analyses examined whether eight theoretically based moderators influenced the relationships between the antecedents and eWallet use intention.

Findings

Price value, hedonic motivation, facilitating conditions and social influence had the strongest relationships with the intention to use eWallets, accounting for virtually all the unique variance. The three weakest antecedents, however, still explained a large percentage of variance. No relationships were significantly moderated.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the lack of data in primary studies, some UTAUT moderators could not be analyzed. Also, common method variance may impact the findings because the primary studies used cross-sectional surveys.

Practical implications

This study provides guidance regarding how companies can increase eWallet adoption rates, which have lagged in certain countries. These recommendations include specific techniques for tailoring messages and emphasizing features and benefits.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first integrative meta-analysis conducted on eWallet use. Combining meta-analysis, regression and relative weight analysis, this study provides an integration of what is currently known about eWallet use intentions.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2020

Rich DeJordy, Emil Milevoj, James M. Schmidtke and William H. Bommer

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of individual difference variables and social relationships on student learning outcomes of short-term study abroad programs.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of individual difference variables and social relationships on student learning outcomes of short-term study abroad programs.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a social network analysis (SNA) approach to examine the effects of friendship, advice and communication networks on student learning outcomes.

Findings

Results indicated that demographic characteristics (e.g. sex, years of work experience) did not influence learning outcomes nor the enjoyment of the experience. Social networks positively influenced students’ perceived improvement in managerial skills, their ability to reflect on their international experience and their intercultural sensitivity.

Research limitations/implications

Social relationships may be an important factor to consider in understanding the relationship between short-term study abroad programs and learning outcomes.

Practical implications

Program directors and faculty members need to consider the design of assignments and activities that may facilitate the development of specific types of social relationships (e.g. friendship, communication and advice). These specific social relationships may have unique influences on specific learning outcomes of short-term study abroad programs.

Originality/value

This study is the first study that examined the effects of different types of social relationships on learning outcomes for short-term study abroad programs. The results have important implications for both future research and the design of international study-abroad programs.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

William H. Bommer, Bryan J. Pesta and Susan F. Storrud‐Barnes

This paper aims to explore and test the relationship between emotion recognition skill and assessment center performance after controlling for both general mental ability…

3510

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore and test the relationship between emotion recognition skill and assessment center performance after controlling for both general mental ability (GMA) and conscientiousness. It also seeks to test whether participant sex or race moderated these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Using independent observers as raters, the paper tested 528 business students participating in a managerial assessment center, while they performed four distinct activities of: an in‐basket task; a team meeting for an executive hiring decision; a team meeting to discuss customer service initiatives; and an individual speech.

Findings

Emotion recognition predicted assessment center performance uniquely over both GMA and conscientiousness, but results varied by race. Females were better at emotion recognition overall, but sex neither was related to assessment center performance nor moderated the relationship between it and emotion recognition. The paper also found that GMA moderated the emotion recognition/assessment performance link, as the former was important to performance only for people with low levels of GMA.

Practical implications

The results seem to contradict those who argue that E‐IQ is an unqualified predictor of performance. Emotional recognition is not uniformly valuable; instead, it appears to benefit some groups more than others.

Originality/value

The paper clarifies the emotional intelligence literature by providing further support for the predictive validity of emotion recognition in performance contexts, and by separating out how emotional recognition benefits certain population groups more.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Lynn M. Shore, William H. Bommer, Alaka N. Rao and Jai Seo

This paper examines the relationships that social and economic exchanges, two elements of the employee‐organization relationship (EOR), had with affective commitment…

3645

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the relationships that social and economic exchanges, two elements of the employee‐organization relationship (EOR), had with affective commitment, turnover intentions, employer trust, and altruism. The paper also aims to determine whether reciprocation wariness, reflecting fear of exploitation in reciprocation, moderated relationships that exchange elements had with outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 453 employees of a large Korean electronics organization completed a survey on their work attitudes, behaviors, and demographic characteristics.

Findings

Results showed that reciprocation wariness moderated relations that social exchange had with commitment, turnover intentions, and trust, and that economic exchange had with turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The significance of examining social and economic exchange and of developing conceptualizations of the EOR that incorporate individual differences is discussed.

Practical implications

Organizational leaders need to consider how individuals may differ in responses to exchange elements of the EOR. Common assumptions about the EOR that social exchange is universally beneficial and that the necessity of economic exchange is accepted by all employees may not be accurate.

Originality/value

New theorizing and testing of the role of reciprocation wariness in the EOR contributes to an emerging literature on social and economic exchanges and how individuals may respond to these elements of the EOR.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

534

Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Book part
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Benediktus Margiadi and Amin Wibowo

The purpose of this study is to provide an extensive bibliometric literature review on authentic leadership as a term and concepts to deliver authentic leadership research…

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to provide an extensive bibliometric literature review on authentic leadership as a term and concepts to deliver authentic leadership research with Publish and Perish (PoP) software, Mendeley software, and databases from Google Scholar index. Article located through PoP software based on a Scopus index database. A total of 122 articles refined and analyzed from various qualifying journals starts on January 1999 to December 2018 (20 years). The Mendeley software is used to help manage the references and brief resumes of each article. This chapter presents five clusters to review authentic leadership literature. The clustering process assisted by the VOSviewer software by matching words that often appear in each group, namely antecedents, commitment, performance, positive effects, organizational behavior, and leadership effectiveness. Each of these clusters shows authentic leadership research areas. The five clusters produced through the VOSviewer software provide an overview and research stream of the authentic leadership. Researchers and practitioners need to pay attention to trends and research areas in authentic leadership for improving authentic leadership development.

Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Elizabeth P. Karam, William L. Gardner, Daniel P. Gullifor, Lori L. Tribble and Mingwei Li

Academic and practitioner attention to the constructs of authentic leadership and work engagement and their implications for organizations has grown dramatically over the…

Abstract

Academic and practitioner attention to the constructs of authentic leadership and work engagement and their implications for organizations has grown dramatically over the past decade. Consideration of the implications of these constructs for high-performance human resource practices (HPHRP) is limited, however. In this monograph, we present a conceptual model that integrates authentic leadership/followership theory with theory and research on HPHRP. Then, we apply this model to systematically consider the implications of skill-enhancing, motivation-enhancing, and opportunity-enhancing HR practices in combination with authentic leadership for authentic followership, follower work engagement, and follower performance. We contend that authentic leadership, through various influences processes, promotes HPHRP, and vice versa, to help foster enhanced work engagement. By cultivating greater work engagement, individuals are motivated to bring their best, most authentic selves to the workplace and are more likely to achieve higher levels of both well-being and performance.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2015

William W. Stammerjohan, Maria A. Leach and Claire Allison Stammerjohan

This study extends the budgetary participation–performance/cultural effects literature by isolating and examining the moderating effect of one cultural dimension, power…

Abstract

Purpose

This study extends the budgetary participation–performance/cultural effects literature by isolating and examining the moderating effect of one cultural dimension, power distance, on the budgetary participation–performance relationship. Isolating the impact of power distance is important to this literature because of the fact that participative budgeting remains a possibly underutilized management tool in high power distance countries.

Methodology/approach

We regroup our multinational sample of managers by power distance level, and employ multigroup structural equation modeling (SEM) and a set of nonparametric bootstrap tests to triangulate our findings.

Findings

We find that the majority of our managers from three high power distance countries (Mexico, Korea, and China) score in the lower half of the power distance scale, that there is significant correlation between participation and performance in both the high and low power distance subsamples, but that the mechanisms connecting participation to performance are quite different. While job satisfaction plays a role in connecting budgetary participation and performance among low power distance managers, job relevant information alone connects budgetary participation and performance among their high power distance counterparts.

Originality/value

The primary contribution of our work is that we not only demonstrate that budget participation can improve the performance of subordinate managers in high power distance cultures, but also provide evidence of how and why this is plausible. First managers may not share the same high power distance tendencies of their countrymen, and second, the communication aspect of budget participation appears to be more important for increased performance among those with high power distance tendencies.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-650-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Robert E. Quinn and Kim S. Cameron

In this chapter, we assume the following: (1) the root cause of most organizational problems is culture and leadership, (2) executives seldom want to deal with these root…

Abstract

In this chapter, we assume the following: (1) the root cause of most organizational problems is culture and leadership, (2) executives seldom want to deal with these root causes, (3) because life is uncertain, organizational change is an emergent process, (4) most change processes unfold by reconstructing social reality, (5) the change process is inherently relational, (6) effective change efforts are enhanced by increasing the virtue of the actors, (7) change is embedded in the learning that flows from high-quality relationships, and (8) change agents may have to transcend conventional, economic exchange norms in order to demonstrate integrity and to build trust and openness. Drawing on the field of positive organizational scholarship, we focus on the change agent. We review the literature on self-change and offer several paths for becoming a positive leader.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-554-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Barrie O. Pettman and Richard Dobbins

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

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Abstract

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

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