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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Bruce Lloyd and William Bridges

Presents the transcript of an interview with William Bridges,author of Jobshift: How to Prosper in a Workplace without Jobs.Argues that the whole, traditional concept of…

Abstract

Presents the transcript of an interview with William Bridges, author of Jobshift: How to Prosper in a Workplace without Jobs. Argues that the whole, traditional concept of the job is now becoming a historical artefact. As well as discussing challenges for the future, touches upon benchmarking and re‐engineering, leadership and strategy, and the high priority for learning. The transcript is followed by a review of the book.

Details

International Journal of Career Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Frederic Nortier

Outlines the importance of dissociating change issues fromtransition issues within organizations. Presents some transitiontriggers and shows how they can affect people in…

Abstract

Outlines the importance of dissociating change issues from transition issues within organizations. Presents some transition triggers and shows how they can affect people in their job. Describes a five‐stage model of the transition dynamic, with examples of how people live through organizational transitions. Gives some ideas for addressing these issues and building a transition management approach.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2018

Lesley Page and Jacquie Schoder

Multiple models of organizational change provide guidance, goals and strategic steps for organizations to complete initiatives effectively. The purpose of this paper was…

Abstract

Purpose

Multiple models of organizational change provide guidance, goals and strategic steps for organizations to complete initiatives effectively. The purpose of this paper was to discuss the impact of transformational leadership as it relates to organizational change in the twenty-first century and propose a consolidated approach to planned organizational change useful for practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

Practitioners and researchers can benefit by a strategy to apply models of change to organizational initiatives. It is proposed that models by Kotter (2012), Bridges (2017) and Lewin (1951) can be consolidated into a comprehensive approach to achieve successful organizational change. Transformational leadership is a critical component which bonds such models together and guides the leader’s role in the process.

Findings

Kotter, Bridges and Lewin’s approaches all share similar beliefs about the effectiveness of a transformational leader. First, people and process aspects of change take center stage. Second, urgency needs to unsettle or awaken the need for change. Third, people want to be part of the change process. By involving others, engagement, empowerment and buy-in all increase. Fourth, change will only last if it is embedded into the structures and systems which make up the organization’s culture.

Originality/value

The value of the consolidated approach to change proposed in this paper is that it meets leaders at their level of skill and experience, as it offers options depending on the needs of the organization and extent (depth) of the change required.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2005

Martha G. Rayle

Everyone has a client. Too often clients complain about their service providers and yearn for people who are just like them. This paper focuses on understanding the…

Abstract

Purpose

Everyone has a client. Too often clients complain about their service providers and yearn for people who are just like them. This paper focuses on understanding the differences between clients and consultants, and applying methods for bridging the differences.

Design/methodology/approach

Why do end‐user representatives, facility managers, corporate real estate executives, architects and interior designers have difficulty working together? Do factors like education, experience, role and behavior explain conflicts? Focus groups, interviews, case studies, and published research/literature review lead to personality type and role to articulate and ameliorate differences.

Findings

Specific roles for the end‐user representative (internal client), the facility manager/corporate real estate executive (both service provider and client), and the design consultant (outside service provider) are described, along with each “point of view.” The Myers‐Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI), based upon Carl Jung's personality type theory, provides a vocabulary for explaining obstacles to teamwork. There are large differences between many service providers and internal clients in the S (sensing) – N (intuitive) dichotomy.

Research limitations/implications

Available MBTI data is limited by sample size and date. Larger scale studies of each role should be conducted.

Practical implications

Role and personality differences create obstacles to effective team work. Multi‐level (individual, team and organizational) intervention with structured information exchange and shared experiences can provide a foundation for building constructive relationships.

Originality/value

Few stakeholders in the client/consultant relationship know why there are difficulties, what the difficulties are … or, how to fix them. This paper provides insight into why the problems occur, along with specific methods for solving the problems.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Tamson Pietsch

The purpose of this paper is to bring together the history of war, the universities and the professions. It examines the case of dentistry in New South Wales, detailing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to bring together the history of war, the universities and the professions. It examines the case of dentistry in New South Wales, detailing its divided pre-war politics, the role of the university, the formation and work of the Dental Corps during the First World War, and the process of professionalization in the 1920s.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on documentary and archival sources including those of the University of Sydney, contemporary newspapers, annual reports and publication of various dental associations, and on secondary sources.

Findings

The paper argues that both the war and the university were central to the professionalization of dentistry in New South Wales. The war transformed the expertise of dentists, shifted their social status and cemented their relationship with the university.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine dentistry in the context of the histories of war, universities and professionalization. It highlights the need to re-evaluate the changing place of the professions in interwar Australia in the light both of the First World War and of the university’s involvement in it.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Jeff Austin and Beth Currie

This paper has its roots in a presentation made at CoreNet Global Summit in November 2002 in San Diego, California. In that talk, the authors briefly explained the field…

Abstract

This paper has its roots in a presentation made at CoreNet Global Summit in November 2002 in San Diego, California. In that talk, the authors briefly explained the field of human dynamics and change, and explored, through some actual experiences, the application of change management practices that Wachovia used to lead and nurture organisational change. This paper seeks to make more explicit these hidden forces by giving a more detailed overview of the theory of human dynamics as they relate to change, and some strategies for applying this theory for more effective change management. The venue for this exploration will be Wachovia Corporate Real Estate (CRE) Division’s experience, with significant organisational change required to respond to external and market conditions which threatened its continued success as an organisation. The reader will learn how to understand the human dynamics relating to change; obtain tools for communicating change concepts; find resources to help lead change; ensure that people deal more successfully with organisational change; and measure the significance of human dynamics to business performance.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Amy S. Wharton

Gender divisions are embedded in and essential to the structure of capitalist production. While most men and women in the United States both now work for wages, they…

Abstract

Gender divisions are embedded in and essential to the structure of capitalist production. While most men and women in the United States both now work for wages, they rarely work together. Gender segregation has been identified as one of the major issues of the earnings gap between men and women. An explanation of the forces responsible for this has been difficult to achieve. Most theories fail to consider the contribution of demand‐side factors to gender segregation. Neo‐Marxist analysis of labour market segmentation and theories of the dual economy have provided new frameworks for investigating these structural or demand‐side features of industrial organisation. The pattern of blue‐collar segregation in US manufacturing industries is examined drawing on these theories. Employment data from the US census is used to identify how the levels of blue‐collar segregation in manufacturing industries are influenced by the industry's location within the core or peripheral sector of the US economy. Many of segregation's proposed remedies stress the role of supply‐side factors. These strategies focus attention almost exclusively on male and female workers and ignore the structure of the workplace. Strategies that ignore the dualistic nature of the US economy offer only partial solutions and may be counter‐productive. If forced to eliminate or reduce segmentation, employers may simply restructure their labour processes in a way that undermines rather than contributes to gender inequality. It is apparent that the pursuit of gender equality in the workplace is intrinsically related to and dependent on the broader efforts of workers to achieve greater control over production, both at the workplace and in the economy as a whole.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Debra Orr

Abstract

Details

Team for Change: A Practitioner's Guide to Implementing Change in the Modern Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-017-4

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Abstract

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Coaching and Mentoring for Academic Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-907-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Mary Pelzer Hudson

In recent years, staff members in many libraries have struggled to adjust to an accelerating rate of change. Researchers and observers have noted increasing levels of…

Abstract

In recent years, staff members in many libraries have struggled to adjust to an accelerating rate of change. Researchers and observers have noted increasing levels of stress and conflict in the workplace, probably related to the rapid pace of change. In view of the transformation that is taking place in libraries and library services, it has become essential that library managers assist staff in coping with the resultant stress and conflict. To manage change effectively, it is important to understand the difference between change and transition, and to be aware of the process staff members are experiencing. Developing an inclusive decision‐making style, fostering positive employee attitudes towards change, and utilizing effective communication skills can help make change a more positive experience.

Details

Library Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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