Search results

1 – 10 of over 3000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 July 2020

William Anderson

What gets measured gets done” goes the cliché. Therefore, it is imperative for corporate communicators to understand the measurement of persuasive communication, starting…

Abstract

Purpose

What gets measured gets done” goes the cliché. Therefore, it is imperative for corporate communicators to understand the measurement of persuasive communication, starting with its antecedents. This paper will highlight the link between audience awareness/behavior and persuasive communication through an examination of how 1920s practitioners studied the effect their communications materials (specifically film and print brochures) had on key audiences.

Design/methodology/approach

The author used the cultural-economic model (CEM) of public relations (PR) as a framework to examine the various socio-cultural organizational factors that affected the production and the consumption of communication materials and messages.

Findings

The intent and techniques of PR measurement have not changed much in 100 years. A contemporary practitioner might conduct a study of communications materials in a similar manner as the 1920s social hygienists, and this study adds the concept of human agency to the discussion of PR measurement. This is not to engage in historical presentism and judge past practitioners on current standards. Instead, it is a call for contemporary practitioners to take a deeper look at the moment of consumption and all the variables that go into meaning making.

Originality/value

Most of the field's historical case studies focus on the production of communication messages and materials, while this paper examines those facets as well as audience consumption. Implications for contemporary practitioners are discussed.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1951

T.C. SKEAT

The aim of this publication is to list the catalogues of the Department of Manuscripts which are in regular use. Catalogues which have been superseded by later…

Abstract

The aim of this publication is to list the catalogues of the Department of Manuscripts which are in regular use. Catalogues which have been superseded by later publications are not normally included, since whatever their historical or bibliographical interest they are no longer everyday working tools. To save space in cross‐reference, the catalogues, etc., here listed have been numbered serially in Clarendon type, thus: 31. This numeration has no other significance.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1982

Erdener Kaynak

In developing a corporate imagery for a product, the importance of various marketing mix variables such as product appearance, brand names, advertising strategy and…

Abstract

In developing a corporate imagery for a product, the importance of various marketing mix variables such as product appearance, brand names, advertising strategy and channels used is firmly established. However, an additional factor should be considered, that is national origin of the product or the imagery of the country of origin has often been overlooked by marketers and importers alike. The phrase “made in…” as a fifth element of the marketing mix can have tremendous influence on the acceptance and success of a product over and above the specific advertising techniques used. While the phenomenon of consumer bias against foreign products has been empirically demonstrated in such works by Baumgartner and Jolibert, there is relatively little understanding of the factors underlying such bias. There seems to have been no real advancement in the development of theories which might explain why consumers view foreign products differently than they do domestic products.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 November 2020

John Pardy

Technical education in the twentieth century played an important role in the cultural life of Australia in ways are that routinely overlooked or forgotten. As all…

Abstract

Purpose

Technical education in the twentieth century played an important role in the cultural life of Australia in ways are that routinely overlooked or forgotten. As all education is central to the cultural life of any nation this article traces the relationship between technical education and the national social imaginary. Specifically, the article focuses on the connection between art and technical education and does so by considering changing cultural representations of Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon materials, that include school archives, an unpublished autobiography monograph, art catalogues and documentary film, the article details the lives and works of two artists, from different eras of twentieth century Australia. Utilising social memory as theorised by Connerton (1989, 2009, 2011), the article reflects on the lives of two Australian artists as examples of, and a way into appreciating, the enduring relationship between technical education and art.

Findings

The two artists, William Wallace Anderson and Carol Jerrems both products of, and teachers in, technical schools produced their own art that offered different insights into changes in Australia's national imaginary. By exploring their lives and work, the connections between technical education and art represent a social memory made material in the works of the artists and their representations of Australia's changing national imaginary.

Originality/value

This article features two artist teachers from technical schools as examples of the centrality of art to technical education. Through the teacher-artists lives and works the article highlights a shift in the Australian cultural imaginary at the same time as remembering the centrality of art to technical education. Through the twentieth century the relationship between art and technical education persisted, revealing the sensibilities of the times.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

William Anderson

Over recent years schools have developed considerably as a channel through which manufacturers, retailers and service providers can market their products. Unfortunately…

Abstract

Over recent years schools have developed considerably as a channel through which manufacturers, retailers and service providers can market their products. Unfortunately, marketers themselves are not aware of the development that has taken place. As a result very many marketers are more inclined to say “No. Now what's the question?” whenever marketing to and through schools is proposed. These marketers are missing out on a significant benefit that can be secured for just about every brand — driving sales through the classroom. With input from The Schools Consortium and guidance from the schools themselves, Poise Marketing is helping Friends Provident sell policies through schools. The fact that schools marketing can achieve sales should give brand managers comfort that they are spending their budget wisely.

Details

International Journal of Advertising and Marketing to Children, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6676

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 June 2010

Daniele Besomi

Business cycle theory is normally described as having evolved out of a previous tradition of writers focusing exclusively on crises. In this account, the turning point is…

Abstract

Business cycle theory is normally described as having evolved out of a previous tradition of writers focusing exclusively on crises. In this account, the turning point is seen as residing in Clément Juglar's contribution on commercial crises and their periodicity. It is well known that the champion of this view is Schumpeter, who propagated it on several occasions. The same author, however, pointed to a number of other writers who, before and at the same time as Juglar, stressed one or another of the aspects for which Juglar is credited primacy, including the recognition of periodicity and the identification of endogenous elements enabling the recognition of crises as a self-generating phenomenon. There is indeed a vast literature, both primary and secondary, relating to the debates on crises and fluctuations around the middle of the nineteenth century, from which it is apparent that Juglar's book Des Crises Commerciales et de leur Retour Périodique en France, en Angleterre et aux États-Unis (originally published in 1862 and very much revised and enlarged in 1889) did not come out of the blue but was one of the products of an intellectual climate inducing the thinking of crises not as unrelated events but as part of a more complex phenomenon consisting of recurring crises related to the development of the commercial world – an interpretation corroborated by the almost regular occurrence of crises at about 10-year intervals.

Details

A Research Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-060-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Ian Mann, Warwick Funnell and Robert Jupe

The purpose of this paper is to contest Edwards et al.’s (2002) findings that resistance to the introduction of double-entry bookkeeping and the form that it took when…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contest Edwards et al.’s (2002) findings that resistance to the introduction of double-entry bookkeeping and the form that it took when implemented by the British Government in the mid-nineteenth century was the result of ideological conflict between the privileged landed aristocracy and the rising merchant middle class.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws upon a collection of documents preserved as part of the Grigg Family Papers located in London and the Thomson Papers held in the Mitchell Library in Sydney. It also draws on evidence contained within the British National Archive, the National Maritime Museum and British Parliamentary Papers which has been overlooked by previous studies of the introduction of DEB.

Findings

Conflict and delays in the adoption of double-entry bookkeeping were not primarily the product of “ideological” differences between the influential classes. Instead, this study finds that conflict was the result of a complex amalgam of class interests, ideology, personal antipathy, professional intolerance and ambition. Newly discovered evidence recognises the critical, largely forgotten, work of John Deas Thomson in developing a double-entry bookkeeping system for the Royal Navy and the importance of Sir James Graham’s determination that matters of economy would be emphasised in the Navy’s accounting.

Originality/value

This study establishes that crucial to the ultimate implementation of double-entry bookkeeping was the passionate, determined support of influential champions with strong liberal beliefs, most especially John Deas Thomson and Sir James Graham. Prominence was given to economy in government.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2003

Jonathan L Gifford

Abstract

Details

Flexible Urban Transportation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-050656-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

William P. Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to describe an economic region straddling the Canada‐USA border between Ontario and Michigan from historical and contemporary perspectives. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe an economic region straddling the Canada‐USA border between Ontario and Michigan from historical and contemporary perspectives. It aims to highlight policy challenges for federal, state, provincial and municipal governments.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a general review based on academic literature, government and consultant reports and data from a variety of sources. It begins with a historical review of the study regions. This is followed by a more detailed contemporary review of conditions arising since the attacks of September 11, 2001. A number of possible and ongoing policy options for various orders of government are then described.

Findings

The paper finds that Ontario and Michigan comprise a highly integrated economic region with a particular focus on automotive production. Within that region the Canada‐USA border is a key transportation bottleneck whose impedance effect has gotten worse in the aftermath of September 11, 2001. A variety of policies have been implemented to try to reduce the cost of the border with mixed success and there is little cross‐border interaction among lower orders of government.

Originality/value

To the best of the author's knowledge there has been no other paper published in an academic journal that describes the history, current situation and policy issues of the study region. The value of this paper lies in providing a multidisciplinary overview and a starting point for further research on the region.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 25 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Richard G. Brody, William B. Brizzee and Lewis Cano

One of the key components to fraud prevention is strong internal controls. However, the greatest threat to an organization's information security is the manipulation of…

Abstract

Purpose

One of the key components to fraud prevention is strong internal controls. However, the greatest threat to an organization's information security is the manipulation of employees who are too often the victims of ploys and techniques used by slick con men known as social engineers. The purpose of this paper is to help prevent future incidents by increasing the awareness of social engineering attacks.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the more common social engineering techniques is provided. Emphasis is placed on the fact that it is very easy for someone to become a victim of a social engineer.

Findings

While many organizations recognize the importance and value of having strong internal controls, many fail to recognize the dangers associated with social engineering attacks.

Practical implications

Individuals and organizations remain vulnerable to social engineering attacks. The focus on internal controls is simply not enough and is not likely to prevent these attacks. Raising awareness is a good first step to addressing this significant and potentially dangerous problem.

Originality/value

This paper provides a concise summary of the most common social engineering techniques. It provides additional evidence that individuals need to better understand their susceptibility to becoming a victim of a social engineer as victims may expose their organizations to very significant harm.

Details

International Journal of Accounting & Information Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1834-7649

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000