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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2020

Oluwayomi Kayode Babatunde

The purpose of this study is to map the implications and competencies for Industry 4.0 to the hard and soft aspects of total quality management (TQM).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to map the implications and competencies for Industry 4.0 to the hard and soft aspects of total quality management (TQM).

Design/methodology/approach

The author/s collected data from purposively drawn samples of early-career engineering professionals (ECEPs) using a cross-sectional survey. A total of 20 ECEPs from three small-class cohorts (2014, 2016 and 2018) participated in the survey. The author/s analyzed data using the Kruskal–Wallis test and Wilcoxon–Mann–Whitney test to establish the effect of cohort and gender on the implications and competencies for Industry 4.0. The author/s then mapped the top- and bottom-ranked implications and competencies onto the hard and soft aspects of TQM using a matrix.

Findings

Based on the cohort, significant differences p < 0.05 existed in the interests and competencies for Industry 4.0. In congruence, the 2014 cohort had the highest number of “unique” top- and bottom-ranked competencies and implications spanning the hard and soft TQM. Based on gender, nonsignificant differences p < 0.05 existed in the interests and competencies for Industry 4.0. The male and female ECEPs' “common” top-ranked implications appeared under the hard and soft TQM. All their “common” top-ranked competencies appeared under the hard TQM, while all their “common” bottom-ranked competencies appeared under the soft TQM.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size, context/discipline and perceptual data are limitations.

Practical implications

Optimizing an existing TQM framework/matrix to design Industry 4.0 TQM, advanced as TQM 4.0.

Originality/value

Perspectives of early-career professionals for TQM 4.0 implementation.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2019

Rany Adelina and Esti Nurwanti

Study location may cause a different type of socio-demographic, body mass index (BMI), study intensity and food-related behavior. The increasing number of Indonesia…

Abstract

Purpose

Study location may cause a different type of socio-demographic, body mass index (BMI), study intensity and food-related behavior. The increasing number of Indonesia students who study abroad to Taiwan is interesting to be examined those factors related. The purpose of this study is to examine the food-related behavior of Indonesian college students in different study location.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive cross-sectional study design was used to administer questionnaires assessing socio-demographic, BMI, study intensity, meal preparations, food access and eating behavior of Indonesian college students (n = 493). Study location took in two cities and different countries (Indonesia and Taiwan). Analysis statistics was using frequency descriptive, Chi-square test, Wilcoxon–Mann–Whitney U test, Kruskal–Wallis test and Logistic regression.

Findings

The trend showed students who lived in Malang tended to have healthier eating behavior. Students tended to have a higher prevalence of low study intensity, dependent meal preparation and difficult food access in Taipei. There was a significant relationship between study location and study intensity (p < 0.01), study location and BMI (p < 0.01), study location and meal preparation (p < 0.01), study location and food access (p = 0.02). On the other hand, eating behavior had no significant relationship with study location (p = 0.28). Marital status became the most dominant variable in influencing obesity (OR = 0.198). Findings indicate that there are significant differences between study location with marital status, BMI, study intensity, meal preparation and food access, but not eating behavior. Moreover, married status is most influencing to obesity risk.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this research were data of height and weight was not be measured directly. Moreover, the reliability of the instrument was unexpected. In the future, research needs improvement more sample for fixing it. Moreover, to support initiatives to incorporate eating behavior into body weight management strategies may be needed. The implications are to create an effective nutrition education for Indonesian college students. Hopefully, it will be influencing public attitudes and affecting the quality of life.

Practical implications

Further investigation should consider longitudinal studies to explore the different effects of eating behavior on overweight and obesity. Nutritional education programs should give to young adults not only in developed but also in developing countries.

Originality/value

This paper shows our findings about the difference study location that may cause a different type of eating behavior. The research subject was Indonesian college students who live and study in two cities, Malang-Indonesia and Taipei-Taiwan. The trend showed students who live in Malang tend to have healthier eating behavior. On the other hand, study intensity, meal preparation and food access were significantly different in both cities. Indonesian college students in Taipei tended to have the higher prevalence of low study intensity, dependent meal preparation and difficult food access. The authors believe that the findings would appeal to a broad audience, especially for improving meal preparation in college students who study abroad.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2010

Seong‐Jong Joo, Hokey Min, Ik‐Whan G. Kwon and Heboong Kwon

The purpose of this paper is to illuminate light on the assessment of operating efficiency of specialty coffee retailers from the perspective of socially responsible…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illuminate light on the assessment of operating efficiency of specialty coffee retailers from the perspective of socially responsible global sourcing. This paper evaluates the impact of socially responsible sourcing on the operating efficiencies of specialty coffee retailers before and after implementing fair‐trade practices and compares the operating efficiencies of fair‐trade coffee retailers to those of non‐fair‐trade coffee retailers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes data envelopment analysis (DEA) to measure the comparative efficiency of seven specialty coffee retailers, relative to prior periods and their key competitors. It develops the Charnes‐Cooper‐Rhodes (CCR) model that is designed to derive weights without their being fixed in advance. The CCR version of DEA is adopted to assess the impact of the coffee retailers' policy initiatives (i.e. fair‐trade practices) on their efficiency and measure the change over time (i.e. before and after fair‐trade practices) efficiency of the coffee retailers. As a post hoc DEA analysis, it also performs non‐parametric rank sum statistical tests for any discernable group differences between fair‐trade coffee retailers and non‐fair‐trade coffee retailers.

Findings

The study found that a group of coffee retailers committed to socially responsible sourcing (i.e. fair‐trade) practices tended to perform significantly better than the group which has yet to commit socially responsible sourcing practices with a concern over increased purchasing price. Also, it was found that a premium purchasing price paid to fair‐trade coffee beans did not undermine the coffee retailer's comparative operating efficiency despite its adverse impact on purchasing cost. In other words, a cost increase resulting from socially responsible business conducts might have been offset by the revenue increase resulting from favorable brand recognition attached to social responsibility.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt to assess the impact of socially responsible sourcing practices on the multinational firms (MNFs) such as specialty coffee retailers' competitiveness and then investigate whether the MNF's commitment to socially responsible sourcing practices can be developed into its long‐term strategic weapon. In addition, it helps specialty coffee retailers formulate future global sourcing strategies by providing the detailed picture of how socially responsible sourcing can impact their competitiveness.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2014

Huimin Li, David Arditi and Zhuofu Wang

Transaction costs arise from economic exchange rather than production activities. However, the term “transaction cost” is not consistently defined in the construction…

Abstract

Purpose

Transaction costs arise from economic exchange rather than production activities. However, the term “transaction cost” is not consistently defined in the construction industry because the concept of transaction cost is not universally accepted by all stakeholders in construction projects. As a result, empirical studies are few and conflicting because accessing data on transaction costs is problematic, and the interpretation of the data is difficult. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the transaction costs borne by the owner in a construction project from the perspective of transaction cost economics and construction project characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was administered to construction owners. The factors that impact transaction costs were analyzed in the context of human-related issues (the owner's and the contractor's positions in the transaction), and environment-related issues (the transaction environment, and project management efficiency). Statistical analyses were conducted to compare the transaction costs incurred in the pre- vs post-contract phases of a project relative to the private vs public sector, different project delivery systems, different procurement methods, and different types of contracts.

Findings

The owners surveyed believe that transaction costs may be reduced if the owner and the contractor follow some basic guidelines (e.g. experience in similar projects, prompt payment, good relationship with project participants, no irregularities in bidding, and only few material substitutions and claims), if the project is well-run (e.g. technical competency, strong leadership, prompt decision-making, effective communication, and fair/speedy conflict management), and if the transaction environment is favorable (e.g. fair risk allocation, early contractor involvement, and complete design documents). The findings of the survey also indicate that post-contract transaction costs are much higher than pre-contract transaction costs expressed as percent of project value and that transaction costs are affected by the owner (public vs private), the procurement method, the project delivery system, and the type of contract.

Originality/value

The primary contribution that this research makes to the body of knowledge is a better understanding of transaction costs incurred by construction owners in the USA. The highest transaction costs are to be expected in the post-contract phase of public projects awarded on a unit price basis, but can be reduced, hence reducing overall project cost.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Mohamed Sherif and Cennet Tuba Erkol

This study aims to comprehensively examine the stock market effects of announcements by firms to issue conventional bonds versus Sukuk. In addition, the authors…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to comprehensively examine the stock market effects of announcements by firms to issue conventional bonds versus Sukuk. In addition, the authors investigate whether the choice of instrument depends on the tax status and government backing of the issuing firm. They split the sample into whole (2000-2015), pre-crisis (2000-2007) and post-crisis (2010-2015) subsamples.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use event study methodology, market model and FTSE Bursa Malaysia EMAS index on 14 different event windows of which five are symmetric and nine are asymmetric. Further, parametric and distribution-free tests are used to investigate the difference of cumulative abnormal returns when using the two instruments (Sukuk and conventional bonds). For the choice of issuing conventional bonds or Sukuk, Heckman procedure is employed to control for the self-selection of the announcement effects.

Findings

The analysis indicates only insignificant difference in reaction to Sukuk and conventional bond issuances for the overall period and pre-crisis period. However, and importantly, they find strong evidence supporting the Malaysian stock abnormal return reaction to Sukuk compared to conventional bond issuances after the global financial crisis. Interestingly, they find that tax incentives and government backing are significant determinants in issuing Sukuk over conventional bonds. Such evidence is confirmed when using a wide range of robustness checks including four different market indices and both parametric and non-parametric tests.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical analysis is subject to limitations. First, the sample is limited to Sukuk issues domiciled in Malaysia. Second, given that Sukuk are collateralized whereas conventional bonds are not, it would only seem logical for the former to be issued by riskier firms whereas the latter would be issued by stronger firms with stable cash flows. The future research can explore this issue some more. Finally, comparing Sukuk with other similar ethical sources of traded capital may provide insights into the globalization of such economic, trade and financial reforms in and outside Malaysia.

Originality/value

To the author’s knowledge, no research has been conducted studying the differential and conflicting results to announcement of Sukuk issuance in the literature, nor the stock market effects of announcements to issue Sukuk over the pre-crisis (2000-2007) and post-crisis (2010-2015) periods. Thus, the study attempts to assess previous findings and contribute additional evidence that investigates the issue in rich setting.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

George Besseris and Panagiotis Tsarouhas

The study aims to provide a quick-and-robust multifactorial screening technique for early detection of statistically significant effects that could influence a product's…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to provide a quick-and-robust multifactorial screening technique for early detection of statistically significant effects that could influence a product's life-time performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed method takes advantage of saturated fractional factorial designs for organizing the lifetime dataset collection process. Small censored lifetime data are fitted to the Kaplan–Meier model. Low-percentile lifetime behavior that is derived from the fitted model is used to screen for strong effects. A robust surrogate profiler is employed to furnish the predictions.

Findings

The methodology is tested on a difficult published case study that involves the eleven-factor screening of an industrial-grade thermostat. The tested thermostat units are use-rate accelerated to expedite the information collection process. The solution that is provided by this new method suggests as many as two active effects at the first decile of the data which improves over a solution provided from more classical methods.

Research limitations/implications

To benchmark the predicted solution with other competing approaches, the results showcase the critical first decile part of the dataset. Moreover, prediction capability is demonstrated for the use-rate acceleration condition.

Practical implications

The technique might be applicable to projects where the early reliability improvement is studied for complex industrial products.

Originality/value

The proposed methodology offers a range of features that aim to make the product reliability profiling process faster and more robust while managing to be less susceptible to assumptions often encountered in classical multi-parameter treatments.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Julia Lutz, Jan Volkholz and Friedrich‐Wilhelm Gerstengarbe

The Orange River is one of the largest river basins in southern Africa. Since it plays a crucial role in the region's ecology and economy, it is important to estimate…

Abstract

Purpose

The Orange River is one of the largest river basins in southern Africa. Since it plays a crucial role in the region's ecology and economy, it is important to estimate future developments in its hydrology. A necessary means to this end are climate projections. This paper seeks to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

In this work the authors present projections obtained by two complementary methods; they use a Statistical Analogue Re‐sampling Scheme (STARS) and a dynamical regional climate model (CCLM – COSMO in Climate Mode). In order to determine the viability of these methods, the authors perform cross‐validations for the years 1976‐2000.

Findings

CCLM shows good performance regarding the 2 m temperature but the reproduction of precipitation is rather poor. STARS, on the other hand, produces very good results for both variables. The climate projections of both models show a considerable temperature increase for the future (2036‐2060, SRES A1B scenario), especially in the inland of the simulation area. However, while CCLM projects a general decrease in precipitation, STARS indicates a strong precipitation decrease in the already dry western part of the region and a moderate decrease resp. no change in the east during the rain season.

Originality/value

For the first time the statistical approach used gridded data as its input. Therefore, it was possible to apply complementary methods in order to generate the climate projections and to compare them.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Hua Song and Lan Wang

The purpose of this paper is to examine current practices of logistics cost management (LCM) in Mainland China and identify factors impacting on the effectiveness of LCM.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine current practices of logistics cost management (LCM) in Mainland China and identify factors impacting on the effectiveness of LCM.

Design/methodology/approach

The questionnaire‐based survey is conducted in Mainland China. To analyze the status quo of LCM in Mainland China, the paper takes two nonparametric tests, Mann‐Whitney Utest and Kruskal‐Wallis one‐way analysis of variance to compare the difference between firms with and without attaching importance to LCM.

Findings

The difficulties of LCM in China is as follows: first, there is a lack of effective cost measurement tools and analyses as well as reporting systems, especially in terms of distributors. Second, it is very critical to organize intra‐organizational cross‐functional teams and inter‐organizational collaboration based on business processes to promote information integrating instead of blindly investing on information technology application. Third, professional logistics managers are in short supply, even among logistics service providers.

Research limitations/implications

First, although the sample covers some industries, the generalization of the conclusion is still limited due to sample size. In future research, more industries should be covered to test the hypotheses proposed. Second, this paper just analyzes the status quo of Chinese company LCM. Future studies are encouraged to deeply explore internal and external operational management factors impacting on LCM.

Practical implications

This paper is a very insightful source of information about LCM in Mainland China for logistics managers and policy makers. This paper provides logistics managers with insight so as to improve their performance. There are also suggestions for government and educational institutions to provide more resources to develop and offer more logistics courses and training programs to fulfill the needs of the logistics industry. The paper sets up a basis for research on LCM in China.

Originality/value

Despite the importance of LCM in Mainland China, the extant literatures scarcely have a sound analysis. Theoretically, this paper extends theories of LCM in China and identifies main issues concerning LCM. This paper is an exploratory study to figure out an effective LCM approach in China.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2019

Mohamed A. Ayadi, Skander Lazrak and Dan Xing

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of bankruptcy protection duration of Canadian public firms, and also investigate the duration for various…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of bankruptcy protection duration of Canadian public firms, and also investigate the duration for various bankruptcy outcomes including the liquidation and re-emergence of bankrupt firms.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses data on all Canadian public firms that applied for bankruptcy protection over the period 1992–2014. The authors mainly apply duration and survival analyses to draw the main conclusions.

Findings

The authors find that larger and older firms with more complicated structures and issues to settle tend to remain under protection from creditors longer, and also ascertain that the fate of relatively successful companies is determined faster. Moreover, the authors report that it takes less time to achieve a final solution for firms under bankruptcy protection when interest rates are increasing and the term spread is high. Finally, firms that file for protection under the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act (CCAA) spend longer restructuring than firms that file under the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act.

Research limitations/implications

The paper investigates only publicly listed firms. The data on private firms that are required to conduct the research are not available.

Practical implications

Various stakeholders including regulators can predict the bankruptcy protection period using the paper’s findings. Depending on the desired outcomes (reduce uncertainly, safeguard jobs or protect creditors’ rights), specific rules can be followed.

Originality/value

To the authors; knowledge, this is the first paper that investigates the Canadian bankruptcy protection duration. It uses the unique Canadian framework to infer the determinants of bankruptcy protection duration and bankrupt firms’ outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Inderjit Kaur and K.P. Kaushik

Mutual funds in India have not been as favourable investment alternatives as in developed countries, as assets under management of mutual funds to gross domestic product…

Abstract

Purpose

Mutual funds in India have not been as favourable investment alternatives as in developed countries, as assets under management of mutual funds to gross domestic product in India have been 7-8 per cent compared to 37 per cent globally. Further, investor base of mutual funds has been narrow, as retail investors constitute 98 per cent of folios but contributed only 58 per cent of investments in September 2014. To broaden the investor base for mutual funds in India, it remains imperative to understand the determinants of investment behaviour of investors towards mutual funds. This study aims to achieve this objective.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the theory of planned behaviour, the study examined the effect of awareness, attitude (perception for outcome) and socioeconomic conditions of an investor on his investment behaviour towards mutual funds with the logit model. The results are based on 450 valid responses from the primary survey in Delhi-NCR.

Findings

The research provided that investment behaviour could be explained with awareness, perception and socioeconomic characteristics of individual investors. Better awareness related to various aspects of mutual funds will have a positive effect on investment in mutual funds. Contrary to belief, risk perception for mutual funds had no effect on the investment decision. Further, socioeconomic characteristics such as age, gender, occupation, income and education of investors had an impact on the awareness about mutual funds.

Research limitations/implications

As the study has been confined to Delhi-NCR, it should be considered a pilot study and needs to be replicated in other states of India to have more robust results.

Practical implications

The study has implications for mutual funds and regulators. The study highlights a lack of awareness about mutual funds among particular sections of society as a reason for non-investment in mutual funds. The mutual funds and regulators need to focus on females, older age groups and middle-income groups in their efforts to improve their awareness about mutual funds. This would improve their investor base and flow of funds in mutual funds. Furthermore, the process of investment in mutual funds needs to simplified.

Originality/value

In an Indian context, this study has been the first attempt to understand the systematic relation between actual investment behaviour towards mutual funds and various determinants such as socioeconomic characteristics, awareness and attitude (perception) about mutual funds.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

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