Search results

1 – 10 of 25
Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Shellie McMurdo and Wickham Clayton

Roland Joffé, the film-maker behind the significant critical hits The Killing Fields (1984) and The Mission (1986), employed a hypnotic aesthetic, which unflinchingly…

Abstract

Roland Joffé, the film-maker behind the significant critical hits The Killing Fields (1984) and The Mission (1986), employed a hypnotic aesthetic, which unflinchingly depicted violence and brutality within different cultural contexts. In 2007, he used a no less impressive aesthetic in a similar way, although this film, Captivity, was met with public outcry, including from self-proclaimed feminist film-maker Joss Whedon. This was based upon the depiction, in advertisements, of gendered violence in the popularly termed ‘torture porn’ subgenre, which itself has negative gendered connotations.

We aim to revisit the critical reception of Captivity in light of this public controversy, looking at the gendered tensions within considerations of genre, narration and aesthetics. Critics assumed Captivity was an attempt to capitalize on the popularity of the torture horror subgenre, and there is evidence that the film-makers inserted scenes of gore throughout the narrative to encourage this affiliation. However, this chapter will consider how the film works as both an example of post-peak torture horror and an interesting precursor to more overtly feminist horror, such as A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014) and Raw (2017). This is seen through the aesthetic and narrative centralizing of a knowing conflict between genders, which, while not entirely successful, does uniquely aim to provide commentary on the gender roles which genre criticism of horror has long considered implicit to the genre’s structures and pleasures.

Details

Gender and Contemporary Horror in Film
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-898-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 March 2020

Wickham Clayton

With three credited scriptwriters and five credited directors, the 1967 release of Casino Royale saw a gang of multifaceted James Bond 007s facing off against an army of…

Abstract

With three credited scriptwriters and five credited directors, the 1967 release of Casino Royale saw a gang of multifaceted James Bond 007s facing off against an army of beautiful, hypersexualised, personality-less female spies, headed by the real James Bond’s neurotic, insecure, American nephew Jimmy. Perhaps this wasn’t Fleming’s intended storyline for Bond’s first outing at Casino Royale, but the resulting parodic outing absorbed and commented upon some of the inherent gendered archetypes of Fleming’s work. What the 1967 Casino Royale accomplishes is a narrative which contrasts varieties of masculinity which are segmented forms of the masculinity defined by Fleming’s Bond. This chapter compares the masculinity of Bond developed in Fleming’s novel, before examining the representations of masculinity inherent within the four key male characters: Sir James Bond (David Niven), Evelyn Tremble (Peter Sellers), Cooper (Terence Cooper) and Dr Noah/Jimmy Bond (Woody Allen). By showing the depictions of masculine elements each of these characters embodies, along with the metanarrative elements of each performer’s persona, this chapter aims to identify how the 1967 Casino Royale both faithfully depicts the masculine elements of Bond while at the same time satirizing Bond’s particular brand of masculinity. This examination ultimately argues that this segmentation of Bondian masculinity is the core point of cohesion in a deeply incoherent, parodic film adaptation of Fleming’s novel.

Details

From Blofeld to Moneypenny: Gender in James Bond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-163-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 March 2020

Abstract

Details

From Blofeld to Moneypenny: Gender in James Bond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-163-1

Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Abstract

Details

Gender and Contemporary Horror in Film
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-898-7

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1981

Jeffrey G. Miller, Peter Gilmour and Roland Van Dierdonck

It is now quite widely accepted that there are benefits to be derived from an integrated management perspective of the flows of purchased parts, components and raw…

Abstract

It is now quite widely accepted that there are benefits to be derived from an integrated management perspective of the flows of purchased parts, components and raw materials from suppliers into and through manufacturing facilities, and of finished products through distribution channels to final consumers. There is, however, far less agreement on how an organisation should marshal its resources to actually derive these benefits. Many options exist: the use of computer‐based systems and management information support; the use of analytical tools to help evaluate decision alternatives adjusting the materials and logistics environment to facilitate the exchange between the organisation and its suppliers and the organisation and its customers; establishing more efficient communication networks and coordination methods for interfunctional information exchange; altering the organisational structure to facilitate the administration of materials functions.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Julian Meyrick and Tully Barnett

In this chapter, we consider dominant arguments for the ‘disaggregation’ of the value of culture into discrete dimensions – economic, social, environmental, heritage and…

Abstract

In this chapter, we consider dominant arguments for the ‘disaggregation’ of the value of culture into discrete dimensions – economic, social, environmental, heritage and cultural and so forth – and their separate measurement. We discuss the role of proxies in assessment processes (‘parts’) and their relationship to the cultural experiences (‘wholes’) for which they are taken to be representative indicators. Disaggregation encourages a divisible approach to cultural activities that, at their heart, present as non-divisible experiences. Thus, we should speak of ‘culture's value’ as opposed to ‘cultural value’ as a way of highlighting a crucial methodological point – that arts and culture are more than the sum of their parts and that the assessment of a particular cultural activity must consider not only the benefits returned by its separate dimensions but also the activity's overall purpose, scope and place in the world. These non-divisible, often non-measurable, contextual features should not be considered contingent externalities but as sense-providing parameters that give meaning to any numerical data whatsoever. We conclude by looking at the issue via an example of a recent stage play from South Australia, Mi:Wi 3027 written by Ngarrindjeri playwright Glenn Shea and commissioned by Country Arts South Australia. The values of the drama cannot be and should not be distinguished from its value, and assessment processes must therefore look to frame the primary cultural experience it embodies in ways that make sense of its purpose, scope and place in the world.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1980

The terms are not synonymous; their differences are mainly of function and areas of administration. Community Health is used in national health service law; environmental…

Abstract

The terms are not synonymous; their differences are mainly of function and areas of administration. Community Health is used in national health service law; environmental health to describe the residuum of health functions remaining with local authorities after the first NHS/Local Government reorganization of 1974. Previously, they were all embraced in the term public health, known for a century or more, with little attention to divisions and in the field of administration, all local authority between county and district councils. In the dichotomy created by the reorganization, the personal health services, including the ambulance service, may have dove‐tailed into the national health service, but for the remaining functions, there was a situation of unreality, which has persisted. It is difficult to know where community health and environmental health begin and end. From the outside, the unreality may be more apparent than real. The Royal Commission on the NHS in their Report of last year state that leaving environmental health services with local authorities “does not seem to have caused any problems”—and this, despite the disparity in status of the area health authority and the bottom tier, local councils.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 82 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

D.T.N. Williamson

Industrial manufacture is the principal source of our national wealth, and it supports all our other activities; consequently its wellbeing is of crucial importance to us…

Abstract

Industrial manufacture is the principal source of our national wealth, and it supports all our other activities; consequently its wellbeing is of crucial importance to us all. It has been developing in three main streams — process manufacture, flowline or mass production, and batch manufacture — and of these only the first has kept in step with the parallel development of society. In the others, the trends of management organization and the work patterns which this has created have been steadily veering into conflict with the values, aspirations and expectations of the people who have to make the industrial system work. The effects are visible now, and unless the patterns are changed, large sectors of industry could eventually become unworkable, because the qualities and skills needed in an individual are unlikely to be combined with a willingness to do the type of job offered. An account of the present position and possible directions of change in flowline and batch production is given, which satisfy the dual criteria of providing improved efficiency and a better match with society.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1981

Elizabeth A.E. Ferris

The orthodox view about women in sport is that, when compared with males, females have always held, and will always continue to hold an inferior position in sporting achievement.

Abstract

The orthodox view about women in sport is that, when compared with males, females have always held, and will always continue to hold an inferior position in sporting achievement.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Abstract

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

1 – 10 of 25