Search results

1 – 10 of over 4000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 April 1991

Nazim U. Ahmed, Cynthia S. Ma and Ray V. Montagno

Currently over seventy percent of the work force is employed in whitecollar jobs. The implication ofwhite‐collar productivity for organizational growth and…

Downloads
292

Abstract

Currently over seventy percent of the work force is employed in whitecollar jobs. The implication ofwhite‐collar productivity for organizational growth and competitiveness is extremely significant. It is easy to measure the productivity for blue‐collar employees, as the inputs and outputs are well defined. However the process of measuring the productivity of the whitecollar employee is complicated. A model for measuring whitecollar productivity is presented. The organization should design its own productivity measures seeking active employee involvement. The measures developed should be used to design productivity improvement strategies for long term growth and competitiveness of the organization.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Mehlika Saraç, Bilçin Meydan and Ismail Efil

Most employee attitudes and behaviors are determined by both personal and situational characteristics. Studies on person–organization fit (POF), which is defined as the…

Abstract

Purpose

Most employee attitudes and behaviors are determined by both personal and situational characteristics. Studies on person–organization fit (POF), which is defined as the congruence between individual and organizational values, also support this assumption. Employees who perceive high POF have high positive work attitudes and low intention to leave. However, this study assumes that the relationship between perceived POF and work attitudes may be different with respect to employees’ status and aims to investigate how perceived POF may differ in consequences among blue-collar and white-collar employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple group analysis of structural equation modeling (SEM) was conducted to test the moderation effect of employee status on the relationship between perceived POF and work attitudes.

Findings

Results indicated that the relationship between perceived POF and organizational commitment, job satisfaction, organizational identification and intention to leave differ with respect to individual’s status (blue-collarwhite collar). As the status of the individuals increases, the relationship between POF and work attitudes (organizational commitment, job satisfaction and organization identification) becomes weaker.

Originality/value

Rather than just focusing results of POF, this study focuses on moderating variables that differentiate the relationship between POF and outcomes by considering individual differences caused by different motivation and abilities.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Nirit Toshav-Eichner and Liad Bareket-Bojmel

This study sought to examine the attitudes of blue-collar workers toward job automation. The study examined the relations between job automation, fear of job loss and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study sought to examine the attitudes of blue-collar workers toward job automation. The study examined the relations between job automation, fear of job loss and self-actualization.

Design/methodology/approach

Using mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative analysis) with 539 participants overall, we examined employees' attitudes toward job automation through two separate studies conducted in a large public organization that employs blue-, white- and pink-collar employees. The blue-collar workers who participated consisted of waste collectors, gardeners and parking supervisors whose work is at risk of job automation.

Findings

We found that 74% of the blue-collar employees described technology as a “replacer” that simplifies and reduces human work activities, while only 3% perceived it as an “enabler” that could enrich their jobs and expand human potential. Fifty-three percent of the employees in the white-collar professions described technology as a “replacer,” and 36% perceived it as an “enabler.” Among pink-collar workers, 51% perceived technology as an “enabler,” while only 14% perceived it as a “replacer.” A positive relationship between job automation and self-actualization was evident for pink- and white-collar workers, but not for blue-collar workers.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on how employees in different types of jobs perceive technological advancements at work. A classification of the perception of technology as an “enabler” vs a “replacer” is presented. The relationships between job automation and self-actualization in different job types are explored.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 21 April 2010

Filipe Almeida-Santos, Yekaterina Chzhen and Karen Mumford

We use household panel data to explore the wage returns associated with training incidence and intensity (duration) for British employees. We find these returns differ…

Abstract

We use household panel data to explore the wage returns associated with training incidence and intensity (duration) for British employees. We find these returns differ depending on the nature of the training, who funds the training, the skill levels of the recipient (white- or blue-collar), the age of the employee and if the training is with the current employer or not. Using decomposition analysis, training is found to be positively associated with wage dispersion: a virtuous circle of wage gains and training exists in Britain but only for white-collar employees.

Details

Jobs, Training, and Worker Well-being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-766-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

Peter Bowen, Valerie E. Elsy and Monica P. Shaw

The purpose of this paper is to consider how far different unions representing whitecollar workers fulfil the expectations of their memberships. In order to focus upon…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to consider how far different unions representing whitecollar workers fulfil the expectations of their memberships. In order to focus upon this problem we intend to concentrate on the area of whitecollar membership of predominantly manual workers' unions: in particular we shall take as examples the cases of the steel and mining industries. At a time when major trade unions representing the whitecollar labour force are competing for membership on an unprecedented scale and when proposals for union amalgamations are currently being voiced, the appropriateness of union policies for this category of employees and their approval by the rank and file are of obvious relevance.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Anna Siukola, Clas‐Håkan Nygård and Pekka Virtanen

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the associations of employees’ attitudes and human resource arrangements to sickness absence from the perspective of absence…

Downloads
891

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the associations of employees’ attitudes and human resource arrangements to sickness absence from the perspective of absence culture and work ability.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted in one of the largest food industry companies in Finland. Sickness absence register data were obtained from the years 2003 to 2005 and a survey from 2005. This survey included single propositions about work arrangements (five propositions) and attitudes (three propositions) during sickness absence. These were analysed by absence days and short (1‐7 days) and long spells (>7 days).

Findings

The attitude of blue‐collar workers who agreed that it is a matter of course that someone is absent was statistically significant regarding sickness absence. They had increased risk for sickness absence days and for short spells. From work arrangements during absence the fact that jobs will wait returning to the workplace decreased the risk for short and long sickness absence spells in both groups. In addition, the fact that the employer will take a substitute during workmates’ absence increased the risk for all measured sickness absence rates among whitecollar workers.

Practical implications

These findings should be noted in enterprises’ human resource management and occupational health services to manage and understand sickness absence.

Originality/value

Although sickness absence has been widely studied, very little is known about sickness absence related work arrangements and attitudes associated with sickness absence. This study increases knowledge about these issues.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Clive Roland Boddy, Ross Taplin, Benedict Sheehy and Brendon Murphy

Influential research has posited that empirical investigation provides no evidence for the existence of white-collar/successful psychopaths. The purpose of this current…

Abstract

Purpose

Influential research has posited that empirical investigation provides no evidence for the existence of white-collar/successful psychopaths. The purpose of this current paper is to review evidence for their existence and report on new, primary research that examines ethical outcomes associated with their presence.

Design/methodology/approach

Leading psychopathy researchers called for research using samples of white-collar workers to explore workplace psychopathy. Therefore, the authors undertook a two-stage research process to examine this. Firstly, a structured literature review sought evidence for “corporate psychopaths”, “white-collar psychopaths” and “successful psychopaths” in existing literature. Secondly, original research was undertaken among 261 Australian workers to examine this further.

Findings

Findings indicate that white-collar psychopaths exist. Where they have been found not to exist, investigation reveals that the samples used were inadequate for the purpose of attempting to find them.

Practical implications

Although there is an inconsistent nomenclature, white-collar, industrial, successful, organisational, workplace or corporate psychopaths do exist and are found in white-collar workplaces.

Social implications

Their existence is important because findings indicate that they have a significant, ethically malign and long-lasting impact on employee well-being and organisational ethical outcomes.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is perhaps the first paper to specifically examine the literature for evidence of whether white-collar psychopaths exist. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is also the first paper to determine that corporate psychopaths are linked with aggressive humour, gender discrimination, fake corporate social responsibility and reduced communications integration.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Trond Petersen, Eva M. Meyersson Milgrom and Vemund Snartland

We report three findings in a comprehensive study of hourly wage differences between women and men working in same occupation and establishment in Sweden in 1970–1990. (1…

Abstract

We report three findings in a comprehensive study of hourly wage differences between women and men working in same occupation and establishment in Sweden in 1970–1990. (1) Within same occupation and establishment in 1990, women on average earn 1.4% less than men among blue-collar workers, 5.0% less among white-collar employees. This occupation-establishment level wage gap declined strongly from 1970 to 1978. (2) For white-collar employees, occupational segregation accounts for much of the wage gap, establishment segregation for little. For blue-collar workers both types of segregation are important. (3) The within-occupation gaps are small, below 4% and 7% for blue- and white-collar workers.

Details

The Governance of Relations in Markets and Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-202-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Lotta K. Harju and Jari J. Hakanen

Job boredom is an amotivational state at work, where employees lack interest in their work activities and have difficulties concentrating on them. Although recent research…

Downloads
2039

Abstract

Purpose

Job boredom is an amotivational state at work, where employees lack interest in their work activities and have difficulties concentrating on them. Although recent research suggests that job boredom may concern a wide range of industries, studies investigating the experience and its emergence in white-collar work are scarce. Thereby the purpose of this paper is to contextualize job boredom by exploring the experience and its preconditions in white-collar work.

Design/methodology/approach

This inductive, exploratory study employed data from 13 focus group interviews (n=72) in four organizations to investigate the emergence and experience of job boredom.

Findings

Three types of job boredom was found. Each type involved distinct temporal experiences: inertia, acceleration and disrupted rhythm at work. The findings suggest that different types of job boredom involve specific conditions that hamper the activation of individual capabilities and disrupt temporal experience accordingly.

Research limitations/implications

Extending the conceptualization of job boredom may enable better understanding of the variety of consequences often associated with the phenomenon.

Practical implications

It is also important for organizations to recognize that there are different types and various preconditions of job boredom in white-collar work, as it may have a negative impact on employee well-being and performance.

Originality/value

The results indicate that job boredom is a more nuanced phenomenon than earlier believed. By identifying job boredom in white-collar work as an experience with various forms and respective preconditions, this study expands the understanding of the phenomenon and its emergence.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Creation and Analysis of Employer-Employee Matched Data
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44450-256-8

1 – 10 of over 4000