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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Charles Jonscher and Ashley Summerfield

Most food‐processing companies in the Western world which haveinternational operations are considering the prospects for businessdevelopment in Central and Eastern Europe

Abstract

Most food‐processing companies in the Western world which have international operations are considering the prospects for business development in Central and Eastern Europe, as previously established markets in the West stagnate or decline. The addition of 300 million people to the community of countries operating under Western market economy principles, following the political upheaval in the region in 1989, has been an important factor in this development. Considers the scope of opportunities in the new Europe; the opening up of new markets; new, if at present limited, spending power. Discusses market entry (costs are comparatively low) and further investment; acquisitions and joint ventures; issues to be addressed by any firm contemplating this market; and post‐entry issues. Concludes that Central and Eastern Europe can provide an attractive and enduring route for corporate grant.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 96 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2008

Scott Fargher, Stefan Kesting, Thomas Lange and Gail Pacheco

This paper aims to contribute to the growing body of empirical evaluations of subjective wellbeing by assessing the impact of basic cultural values and beliefs on job…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the growing body of empirical evaluations of subjective wellbeing by assessing the impact of basic cultural values and beliefs on job satisfaction across 20 countries in Eastern and Western Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

Basic cultural values and beliefs are defined by reference to traditional vs secular values and survival vs self‐expression values, respectively. Data derived from the European Values Study 1999/2000 are utilised, which provide detailed information not only on job satisfaction and socio‐demographic characteristics, but also on individuals' subjective views on religion, family values, work, child‐parent ties, political engagement, tolerance and interpersonal trust. Ordered probit regressions are performed to determine the significance of these characteristics, values and beliefs on job satisfaction.

Findings

The study highlights the strong influence of a society's broad cultural heritage on individuals' wellbeing at work. This raises questions about the impetus for numerous motivational interventions by managers and consultants. Traditional cultural values exhibit a strong influence on workers' job satisfaction in Western Europe. Interpersonal trust serves as a particularly strong predictor of job satisfaction for both Eastern and Western Europe, and for both male and female workers. The main difference between Eastern and Western Europe is driven primarily by the importance of family and religion.

Originality/value

In previous studies, job satisfaction has been strongly associated with measures of organisational culture. In contrast, the broad cultural heritage of a society as measured by its basic value and belief system has not figured prominently in this literature. This paper adds value by contributing to this fledgling field of empirical research.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Abstract

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The Development of Socialism, Social Democracy and Communism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-373-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Nicholas Ridley

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the banking systems in Western, and Central and Southeastern Europe, focusing on the interactive factors of anti‐money laundering…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the banking systems in Western, and Central and Southeastern Europe, focusing on the interactive factors of anti‐money laundering, transitional economies and the underground illicit economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides a comparative analysis of the banking systems in Western, and Central and Southeastern Europe.

Findings

The transition economies of central and Southeastern Europe face, and have been confronted for over a generation by, the interlinked problems of the transition stage post‐1989, the alternative or illegal economy, and the vulnerability of banking systems to money laundering. In contrast, by the 1990s, Western European central banks have become established as an essential government organ in macro‐economic policies.

Originality/value

Suggests an interesting lesson that might be gained from the experiences of central and Southeastern Europe and anti‐money laundering since the late‐1990s, where a national bank or central bank has not been essential, indeed has been comparatively unimportant, compared to the developed banking system led by the individual banks.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Zhanna Belyaeva, Edyta Dorota Rudawska and Yana Lopatkova

The presented study pinpoints transformation of business models of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the food and beverage sector depending on their sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

The presented study pinpoints transformation of business models of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the food and beverage sector depending on their sustainability strategy. This paper makes a novel contribution to understanding various instruments of sustainability implementation in SMEs’ business models operating in the food and beverage industry of well-developed Western European countries versus less-developed Central–Eastern European countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical basis is a survey of 770 European SMEs, of which 369 operate in Western European countries (including Great Britain, Germany and Spain) and 401 in Central and Eastern Europe (including Poland, Croatia and Russia). The nonparametric U Mann–Whitney test was used to examine the significance of the differences between the two groups of companies.

Findings

The study empirically confirmed that despite self-declared lack of skills and knowledge in managerial impacts of sustainability, it shapes business models of SME in both country groups in food and drink industry. At the same time, the motivation grounds for business models transformation toward sustainable models vary between mostly economic factors in Eastern Europe and social and cultural factors in Western Europe. The economic factor is formed due to smaller integration into social investments at the SME-level Eastern European countries, while Western European SMEs invest more in a variety of sustainability supporting instruments (R&D, new equipment).

Originality/value

This comparative study is the novel empirical research study on the implementation of sustainability into business models of food and beverage SMEs operating in two groups of Western and Central–Eastern European countries, which has not been previously observed in such a setting.

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

P.S. Raju

Consumer behavior in international markets is a topic that is stillnot well understood. Proposes a framework, called the A‐B‐C‐D paradigm.Suggests that a marketer examine…

Abstract

Consumer behavior in international markets is a topic that is still not well understood. Proposes a framework, called the A‐B‐C‐D paradigm. Suggests that a marketer examine four stages – access, buying behavior, consumption characteristics, and disposal – covering the entire spectrum of consumer behaviors with respect to a product/service. The paradigm is universally applicable to any particular culture or country of interest. Since there has been no comprehensive examination of consumer behavior in eastern Europe and the Third World, focusses on using the A‐B‐C‐D paradigm to gain a better insight into consumer behavior in these countries. Offers recommendations to companies wishing to market their products in these countries.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1991

Abbass F. Alkhafaji

The study of international business has become increasinglyimportant in recent years. So important that the American Assembly ofthe Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB…

Abstract

The study of international business has become increasingly important in recent years. So important that the American Assembly of the Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) has called for the internationalisation of business curricula. In 1992 and beyond, successful business people will treat the entire world as their domain. No one country can operate in an economic vacuum. Any economic measures taken by one country can affect the global economy. This book is designed to challenge the reader to develop a global perspective of international business. Globalisation is by no means a new concept, but there are many new factors that have contributed to its recently accelerated growth. Among them, the new technologies in communication and transport that have resulted in major expansions of international trade and investment. In the future, the world market will become predominant. There are bound to be big changes in the world economy. For instance the changes in Eastern Europe and the European Community during the 1990s. With a strong knowledge base in international business, future managers will be better prepared for the new world market. This book introduces its readers to the exciting and rewarding field of international management and international corporations. It is written in contemporary, easy‐to‐understand language, avoiding abstract terminology; and is organised into five sections, each of which includes a number of chapters that cover a subject involving activities that cross national boundaries.

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1981

R. Gray

Air freight is often used in the transport of goods between the United Kingdom and Western European destinations despite a well developed, competitive and generally much…

Abstract

Air freight is often used in the transport of goods between the United Kingdom and Western European destinations despite a well developed, competitive and generally much cheaper road groupage (consolidation) industry. In particular, until 1980, express road services with fast delivery times comparable to air do not appear to have made much impact on shippers. This paper examines some of the possible reasons for the continuing existence of a reasonably high level of demand for air freight to Western Europe from the United Kingdom. Air freight appears to be used mainly for the sake of urgency which is usually associated with transit time. This paper examines some of the other factors which may be taken into account by shippers when deciding between air and surface transport.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 11 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

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Book part
Publication date: 24 May 2007

Frederic Carluer

“It should also be noted that the objective of convergence and equal distribution, including across under-performing areas, can hinder efforts to generate growth

Abstract

“It should also be noted that the objective of convergence and equal distribution, including across under-performing areas, can hinder efforts to generate growth. Contrariwise, the objective of competitiveness can exacerbate regional and social inequalities, by targeting efforts on zones of excellence where projects achieve greater returns (dynamic major cities, higher levels of general education, the most advanced projects, infrastructures with the heaviest traffic, and so on). If cohesion policy and the Lisbon Strategy come into conflict, it must be borne in mind that the former, for the moment, is founded on a rather more solid legal foundation than the latter” European Commission (2005, p. 9)Adaptation of Cohesion Policy to the Enlarged Europe and the Lisbon and Gothenburg Objectives.

Details

Managing Conflict in Economic Convergence of Regions in Greater Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-451-5

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Abstract

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Handbook of Transport Strategy, Policy and Institutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-0804-4115-3

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