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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Robert East, Mark D. Uncles, Jenni Romaniuk and Wendy Lomax

This paper aims to review the validation of assumptions made in agent-based modeling of diffusion and the sufficiency (completeness) of the mechanisms assumed to operate.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the validation of assumptions made in agent-based modeling of diffusion and the sufficiency (completeness) of the mechanisms assumed to operate.

Design/methodology/approach

One well-cited paper is examined.

Findings

Evidence is presented that casts doubt on the assumptions and mechanisms used. A range of mechanisms is suggested that should be evaluated for inclusion in diffusion modeling.

Originality/value

The need for validation of assumptions has been stressed elsewhere but there has been a lack of examples. This paper provides examples. The stress on the sufficiency of the mechanisms used is new.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Robert East, Mark D. Uncles, Jenni Romaniuk and Wendy Lomax

This paper aims to respond to the commentaries by Nejad, and Rand and Rust on the paper “Improving Agent-Based Models of Diffusion”.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to respond to the commentaries by Nejad, and Rand and Rust on the paper “Improving Agent-Based Models of Diffusion”.

Design/methodology/approach

Evidence on the nature of word of mouth was reviewed and related to the views expressed by the authors of the commentaries.

Findings

The authors of this paper remain concerned about the assumptions used in agent-based models of diffusion.

Originality/value

The study refers to previously published work.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

David Stokes and Wendy Lomax

Marketing in entrepreneurial contexts, such as small business, relies heavily on word of mouth (WOM) recommendations for customer acquisition. However, we know little…

Abstract

Marketing in entrepreneurial contexts, such as small business, relies heavily on word of mouth (WOM) recommendations for customer acquisition. However, we know little about how WOM processes work for small firms, or how owner‐managers can influence them. This case study of an entrepreneurial owner of an independent hotel is used to illustrate the problems associated with WOM, and potential strategies to overcome them. The owner‐manager researched existing hotel customers through face‐to‐face interviews and a questionnaire. The results confirmed the importance of WOM, but found two sets of dissonance. One was between input WOM types and sources, the other between output WOM content and targets. The owner‐manager improved the effectiveness of WOM communications through a variety of interventions, thus demonstrating that WOM can be an effective part of a marketing strategy for a small firm.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02634509610152673. When citing…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02634509610152673. When citing the article, please cite: Wendy Lomax, (1996), “The measurement of cannibalization”, Marketing Intelligence & Planning, Vol. 14 Iss: 7, pp. 20 - 28.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

David Stokes, Sameera Ali Syed and Wendy Lomax

Owner‐managers of small businesses invariably cite word of mouth recommendations as the principal way in which they attract new customers. Marketing theory is…

Abstract

Owner‐managers of small businesses invariably cite word of mouth recommendations as the principal way in which they attract new customers. Marketing theory is under‐developed in this field with little empirical evidence about the recommending behaviour of small business customers and referral groups. The case study of an independent health club reported here illustrates how these processes can be researched and the results used to influence word of mouth recommendations. The owner‐manager of the club carried out some basic research on his customer base in order to identify the types of members who were most active in recommending the club, and the stimuli that led to recommendations being made. A key finding was that newer members were more likely to recommend than those who had been members for some time, contradicting the implications of relationship marketing theories that long standing customers generate most recommendations. Membership more than doubled following a number of activities designed to increase recommending behaviour. The most important stimuli to recommendations were believed to be involvement with the club, incentives and experiential factors. The case study indicates that word of mouth strategies benefit from research to find out which customers are recommending the business, what they are recommending about the business and what prompts them to do so.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2007

Philippa Hankinson, Wendy Lomax and Chris Hand

As staff are vital to successful re‐branding, particularly in the charity sector where restricted budgets limit reliance on external marketing, it is important to…

Abstract

Purpose

As staff are vital to successful re‐branding, particularly in the charity sector where restricted budgets limit reliance on external marketing, it is important to understand the impact of re‐branding on staff. This study aims to examine the effect of time on staff knowledge, attitudes and behaviour and, in addition, the interaction of time with seniority, tenure and level of support for re‐branding.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first explores the literature from both the for‐profit and non‐profit sectors. A quantitative study was undertaken in nine leading, UK charities that had re‐branded two, three and four years ago; n=345. The data were analysed using one‐way and two‐way ANOVAs.

Findings

A negative relationship was found between time since re‐branding and the three constructs of knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. But this consistency was not mirrored by a consistency in the impact of interaction effects.

Practical implications

Re‐branding is not a one‐off event. To sustain its benefits, organizations need to re‐visit its outcomes on a regular basis to ensure staff retain new knowledge, remain positively motivated and maintain their recently adapted behaviours over time.

Originality/value

Thought to be the first empirical paper to explore the effects of re‐branding over time. Furthermore, the findings contradict those from the extant literature that claim that organizational change requires a “settling in” period. By contrast these findings suggest that the positive effects of re‐branding are best felt in the immediate wake of re‐branding and thereafter fade over time.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Robert East, Wendy Lomax, Gill Willson and Patricia Harris

Reports on the results from a consumer survey of shopping trips tosupermarkets in England and Wales. Most people exhibit habits about whenthey do their main trip to the…

Abstract

Reports on the results from a consumer survey of shopping trips to supermarkets in England and Wales. Most people exhibit habits about when they do their main trip to the supermarket: 61 per cent have a usual day and 67 per cent a usual time of day. Most shoppers state that they could shop at other times but give reasons for their actual times that reflect situational pressures such as the pattern of work and nearness to the weekend. Many people state that they deliberately avoid busy shopping times and the survey showed that a small number of these people do so. However, there was no significant tendency for those who dislike checkout delay to shop at quieter times than for those who are tolerant of this delay. Store operators cannot change the main situational factors that control the time of use of stores and this limits their ability to influence when people shop. Nevertheless, the survey indicated that some increase in the use of off‐peak times could be achieved by permanent in‐store changes and better promotion of the off‐peak times.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Wendy Lomax

Notes that the risk of cannibalization is a very real threat for many new product launches and that the risk becomes even more significant if the new product is launched…

Abstract

Notes that the risk of cannibalization is a very real threat for many new product launches and that the risk becomes even more significant if the new product is launched under the same brand name as an existing product. Points out that, since line extension is by far the most common branding strategy for new products, it is important that managers develop their understanding of the effect and that little empirical work has been published on the subject. Defines cannibalization and examines three techniques which managers might use to measure it. Tests gains loss analysis, duplication of purchase tables and deviations from expected share movements on consumer panel data relating to three line extensions in the UK and German detergent markets. Presents results showing cannibalization of the parent brand by all three extensions and suggesting the need for managers to use multiple methods when evaluating the degree of cannibalization. Emphasizes the need to sample over time, since the extent of cannibalization is shown to be dynamic.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 1995

Colin Gilligan

Given the ways in which the research pressures on university staff are becoming seemingly ever greater, an issue of the European Journal of Marketing that is given over to…

Abstract

Given the ways in which the research pressures on university staff are becoming seemingly ever greater, an issue of the European Journal of Marketing that is given over to a survey of the kinds of research initiatives which are currently being carried out is timely. The study which provides the basis for this was conducted between December 1994 and February 1995, with questionnaires being sent to staff in universities throughout Europe. At the time the final selection was made, a total of 150 responses had been received from 18 countries.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Rachel Crane

Film provides an alternative medium for assessing our interpretations of cultural icons. This selective list looks at the film and video sources for information on and…

Abstract

Film provides an alternative medium for assessing our interpretations of cultural icons. This selective list looks at the film and video sources for information on and interpretations of the life of Woody Guthrie.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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