Search results

1 – 8 of 8
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Ed B. Peile and Wendy Briner

New ways of working predicate new ways of learning. Reports on a workshop which examined facilitated case history discussions as a means whereby a team could share and extend…

1122

Abstract

New ways of working predicate new ways of learning. Reports on a workshop which examined facilitated case history discussions as a means whereby a team could share and extend their learning around the common focus of interest – the patient. Discussion in the workshop focused on “how‐to” aspects of small group facilitation. A question stimulated subsequent enquiry about “privileging voices”. Examines how the facilitation enabled interactive, inter‐professional education through an informal form of discourse analysis on the transcripts of the case discussions. The concept of “privileging voices” is demonstrable in the way the authors worked to facilitate the case history discussions.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 6 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Filotheos Ntalianis and Wendy Darr

The primary purpose of this study was to explore the potential of religiosity in predicting employee psychological contracts. In addition, the moderating influence of work status…

Abstract

The primary purpose of this study was to explore the potential of religiosity in predicting employee psychological contracts. In addition, the moderating influence of work status on this variable's relationship with contract outcomes was examined. To minimize the influence of common method bias, a survey was administered to a sample of student employees (N = 172) on two separate occasions. Results provide evidence for the moderating role of work status on the association between religiosity and transactional contract orientation and some support for the theorized distinction between contract orientations of part‐time and full‐time employees. Findings are discussed in light of features unique to this sample and the measures used, providing directions for future research in this area.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Gill Coleman and Liz Wiggins

The purpose of this paper is to argue for the widening of attention in healthcare improvement efforts, to include an awareness of the humanity of people who work in the sector and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue for the widening of attention in healthcare improvement efforts, to include an awareness of the humanity of people who work in the sector and an appreciation of the part human connection plays in engagement around good quality work. Theoretical frameworks and research approaches which draw on action-based, interpretive and systemic thinking are proposed, as a complement to current practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the early stages of an action research (AR) project, which used the appreciative inquiry “4D” framework to conduct participative inquiry in Hamad Medical Corporation’s ambulance service in Qatar, in which staff became co-researchers.

Findings

The co-researchers were highly motivated to work with improvement goals as a result of their participation in the AR. They, and their managers, saw each other and the work in new ways and discovered that they had much to offer.

Research limitations/implications

This was a small-scale pilot project, from which findings must be considered tentative. The challenges of establishing good collaboration across language, culture and organisational divides are considerable.

Practical implications

Appreciative and action-oriented inquiry methods can serve not only to find things out, but also to highlight and give value to aspects of humanity in the workplace that are routinely left invisible in formal processes. This, in turn, can help with quality improvement.

Originality/value

This paper is a challenge to the orthodox way of viewing healthcare organisations, and improvement processes within them, as reliant on control rather than empowerment. An alternative is to actively include the agency, sense-making capacity and humanity of those involved.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 July 2020

Salvatore V. Falletta and Wendy L. Combs

The purpose of the paper is to explore the meaning of Human Resources (HR) analytics and introduce the HR analytics cycle as a proactive and systematic process for ethically…

39105

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to explore the meaning of Human Resources (HR) analytics and introduce the HR analytics cycle as a proactive and systematic process for ethically gathering, analyzing, communicating and using evidence-based HR research and analytical insights to help organizations achieve their strategic objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual review of the current state and meaning of HR analytics. Using the HR analytics cycle as a framework, the authors describe a seven-step process for building evidence-based and ethical HR analytics capabilities.

Findings

HR analytics is a nascent discipline and there are a multitude of monikers and competing definitions. With few exceptions, these definitions lack emphasis on evidence-based practice (i.e. the use of scientific research findings in adopting HR practices), ethical practice (i.e. ethically gathering and using HR data and insights) and the role of broader HR research and experimentation. More importantly, there are no practical models or frameworks available to help guide HR leaders and practitioners in doing HR analytics work.

Practical implications

The HR analytics cycle encompasses a broader range of HR analytics practices and data sources including HR research and experimentation in the context of social, behavioral and organizational science.

Originality/value

This paper introduces the HR analytics cycle as a practical seven-step approach for making HR analytics work in organizations.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Russell Cropanzano, Howard M Weiss and Steven M Elias

Display rules are formal and informal norms that regulate the expression of workplace emotion. Organizations impose display rules to meet at least three objectives: please…

Abstract

Display rules are formal and informal norms that regulate the expression of workplace emotion. Organizations impose display rules to meet at least three objectives: please customers, maintain internal harmony, and promote employee well-being. Despite these valid intentions, display rules can engender emotional labor, a potentially deleterious phenomenon. We review three mechanisms by which emotional labor can create worker alienation, burnout, stress, and low performance. Though not as widely discussed, emotional labor sometimes has propitious consequences. We discuss the potential benefits of emotional labor as well.

Details

Emotional and Physiological Processes and Positive Intervention Strategies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-238-2

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Mary Barrett, Anne Cox and Blake Woodward

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the psychological contracts (PCs) of international volunteers (IVs) in international aid and development organizations (IADS)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the psychological contracts (PCs) of international volunteers (IVs) in international aid and development organizations (IADS). Specifically, it explores four questions: how IVs form PCs; what the content of these PCs is; how IVs’ PCs are maintained; and how they are fulfilled or breached.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used an inductive analysis of qualitative data: interviews with 27 IVs from a range of IADS.

Findings

The findings take the form of research propositions: RP1: IVs’ PCs, like those of domestic volunteers, include relational, transactional and, especially, values-based elements, but the balance of these is influenced by their values-based PC; the self-directed way IVs join their organizations; and reliance on peers rather than the organization’s management hierarchy. RP2: the PCs of IVs working for faith-based organizations have an additional element: spiritual support. RP3: the values-based PC means many transactional elements can be “adjusted away”, making it difficult to breach these PCs. RP4: experienced volunteers have very minimal PCs, but are more likely than inexperienced volunteers to expect basic safety and adequately skilled colleagues.

Research limitations/implications

The authors suggest areas of new inquiry and specific ways each research proposition could be tested empirically.

Practical implications

To alleviate IVs’ expatriation and repatriation adjustment problems, international aid organizations could facilitate the ways IVs already help each other. This would also help fulfill IVs’ PCs.

Originality/value

IVs are a growing but underexplored group and aspects of their PCs may be unique.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Jim McKenna and Wendy Mackey Jones

While work‐home conflict has well‐established negative outcomes, few studies explore how this might be resolved. This study explored the delivery and outcomes of a three‐session…

1691

Abstract

While work‐home conflict has well‐established negative outcomes, few studies explore how this might be resolved. This study explored the delivery and outcomes of a three‐session workplace intervention delivered by a non‐specialist counsellor to women with high work‐home conflict, using solution‐focused therapy (SFT). Transcripts from the counselling sessions provided the key data for the study. Participants had unique combinations of conflict, and unique levels of self‐assessed success in developing and sticking to their solutions. These perspectives are spillover (home or work affect each other), segmenting (demands are ring‐fenced in one domain) and compensation (demands in one domain are balanced with contributions to the other). Although the specific solutions generated may not be new to “outsiders”, they were to these women, and were unlikely to have been undertaken without the intervention.

Details

Health Education, vol. 104 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 December 2017

Emma Corder and Linda Ronnie

Although private health care is regarded as providing a premium quality experience for both patients and staff alike, it is not without its daily challenges for health…

1863

Abstract

Purpose

Although private health care is regarded as providing a premium quality experience for both patients and staff alike, it is not without its daily challenges for health professionals. This study aims to explore the psychological contract of nurses to develop a greater understanding of how employee–employer interaction impacts motivation levels.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered through semi-structured interviews with thirteen nurses at a private hospital in South Africa. Five nursing managers were interviewed to provide a management perspective. Thematic analysis was used to identify the salient elements of the psychological contract and to establish connections with motivational features.

Findings

The psychological contract of nurses was balanced in nature, contained predominantly relational elements and was characterized by the need for manager support, leadership and autonomy. Motivation was a by-product of fulfilment and was enhanced by a combination of tangible and intangible rewards.

Practical implications

Nursing managers should recognize their role in caring for the wellbeing of their staff and should be trained accordingly. Equipping nurses with the necessary tools to work autonomously, as well as acknowledging their skills, will stimulate confidence and improve motivation.

Originality/value

This study makes an important contribution to the existing literature on the psychological contract of nurses within the health-care system. It provides insight into relationship-based mechanisms that can be used to improve the motivation of nurses and thus impact the overall quality of patient care.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

1 – 8 of 8