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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

John M. Carroll, Mary Beth Rosson, Philip L. Isenhour, Christina Van Metre, Wendy A. Schafer and Craig H. Ganoe

MOOsburg is a community‐oriented multi‐user domain. It was created to enrich the Blacksburg Electronic Village by providing real‐time, situated, interaction, and a

Abstract

MOOsburg is a community‐oriented multi‐user domain. It was created to enrich the Blacksburg Electronic Village by providing real‐time, situated, interaction, and a place‐based information model for community information. We are experimenting with an implementation fundamentally different from classic multi‐user domains object‐oriented (MOOs), supporting distributed system development and management, and a direct manipulation approach to navigation. To guide the development of MOOsburg, we are focusing on a set of community‐oriented applications, including a virtual science fair.

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Internet Research, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Amira L. Allen, Wendy D. Manning, Monica A. Longmore and Peggy C. Giordano

In the US, approximately 70% of mothers and 93% of fathers with children who are under 18 years are in the paid labor force, and studies have documented that employed…

Abstract

In the US, approximately 70% of mothers and 93% of fathers with children who are under 18 years are in the paid labor force, and studies have documented that employed parents with young children often experience high levels of stress as they attempt to manage or balance the demands of their work and family roles. The current study focused on factors associated with observed variability in reports about work–family stress and considered the roles of parenting stress, child characteristics, as well as conflict with the other parent. Prior research has shown that parenting a more “difficult” child is a source of parenting stress, but such studies have not focused specifically on work–family conflict as a consequential outcome, have tended to be limited to older parents, and often have focused only on mothers. We also investigated the role of partner disagreements about assistance with parenting responsibilities as a further complication to family life that may influence perceived work–family stress among co-residential parents. Drawing on data from employed young adult parents, the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (TARS) (n=263), we found that having a child perceived as more difficult was associated with greater work–family stress. Among co-residential parents, stress but not parenting disagreements with the other parent was associated with greater work–family stress. The findings highlight the importance of providing institutional and informal support to such parents.

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Transitions into Parenthood: Examining the Complexities of Childrearing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-222-0

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Wendy C. Regoeczi and Stephanie Kent

Through systematic observation of police decision-making behavior, the aim of this paper is to investigate what factors differentiate between citizens who receive a

Abstract

Purpose

Through systematic observation of police decision-making behavior, the aim of this paper is to investigate what factors differentiate between citizens who receive a warning vs a ticket from police and whether the influence of those factors varies by race. The paper also explores the context of those decisions for both blacks and whites to further the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of any observed differences in the likelihood of receiving a ticket vs a warning.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected during police ridealongs conducted in a sample of cities within Cuyahoga County, Ohio. A total of 140 ridealongs were completed, yielding a total of 312 vehicle or citizen stops.

Findings

The paper finds that black citizens are more likely to receive a ticket than white citizens. However, the paper also finds important differences in the situational context of traffic stops for blacks and whites and uncover evidence of a cycle of traffic tickets and license suspensions among some black drivers.

Research limitations/implications

The study demonstrates the importance of examining the underlying situational context in analyses of decision making in traffic stops. The main limitation of the analyses is that the data were limited to one county in the state of Ohio.

Practical implications

The data suggests that one of the causes of the racial disparities in tickets vs warnings involves a cycle of tickets and license suspensions that occurs among some black drivers. These drivers appear to become caught up in a cycle where a compilation of prior tickets from traffic infractions, driving without insurance, or defaulting on child support payments leads to high numbers of points and subsequent license suspensions. The paper discusses some practical implications for addressing this pattern, including specific programs that could be adopted by municipalities that seek to break the cycle of repeated violation of driver's license laws.

Originality/value

Beyond identifying the impact of citizen race on the likelihood of receiving a warning vs a ticket during a traffic stop, this study contributes to the existing literature by exploring the situational context of these decisions, and identifying the ways in which variations in situational contexts help explain racial differences in outcomes in traffic stops. The identification of a traffic ticket cycle among some black drivers appears to be an original finding.

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Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Tony Worsley, Wei Chun Wang and Wendy Hunter

Baby boomers (people born between 1946 and 1964) are approaching retirement and there is concern about their preparation for their future health and wellbeing. Food…

Abstract

Purpose

Baby boomers (people born between 1946 and 1964) are approaching retirement and there is concern about their preparation for their future health and wellbeing. Food shopping is likely to play a major role in their future lives. The purpose of this paper is to examine their reasons for choosing to buy food from particular shops and whether demographic characteristics and health status were associated with them.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted among a random sample of 1,037 people aged between 40 and 71 years in Victoria, Australia. Respondents were asked to indicate, from a list, their reasons for choosing to shop at particular food outlets. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between respondents' demographics and health status and their reasons for shopping at the food stores.

Findings

Multivariate analysis showed that the reasons the respondents reported in choosing shops fell into four groups: saving, convenience, quality and healthy foods, and user‐friendly environment. Saving was negatively related to income, age, level of education and also linked with country of birth, religious affiliation, and marital status. Convenience was negatively associated with age and also related to health status and religious affiliation. Quality/healthy food products were positively related to age but negatively associated with body mass index, and also linked to country of birth. User‐friendly environment was negatively associated with income and education and related to gender and religious affiliation.

Originality/value

The paper's results show that stores could provide more information, perhaps as signage, to their recycling and health information facilities, particularly in low socio‐economic status areas. Furthermore, the social status and religious associations confirm the view that shopping reflects broad societal affiliations among baby boomers. Shopping centres can be used to provide support for health and environmental sustainability promotions.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 39 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2017

Yanli Lu, Yao Yao, Shuang Li, Qian Zhang and Qingjun Liu

Using the remarkable olfaction ability, insects can sense trace amounts of host plant volatiles that are notorious for causing severe damage to fruits and vegetables and…

Abstract

Purpose

Using the remarkable olfaction ability, insects can sense trace amounts of host plant volatiles that are notorious for causing severe damage to fruits and vegetables and in consequence the industry. The purpose of the paper is to investigate the interactions between olfactory proteins, odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and host plant volatiles through the developed olfactory biosensors. It might be helpful to develop novel pest control strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the successfully expressed and purified OBPs of the oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis, a biosensor was developed by immobilizing the proteins on interdigitated electrodes through nitrocellulose membrane. Based on electrochemical impedance sensing, benzaldehyde emitted by the host plants, such as Beta vulgaris, was detected, which could be used to investigate and analyze the mechanisms of pests’ sense of chemical signals. The relative decreases of charge transfer resistances of the sensor were proportional to the odorant concentrations from 10−7 M to 10−3 M. Meanwhile, the interactions between OBPs and benzaldehyde were studied through the process of molecular docking.

Findings

The paper provides a pest OBPs-based biosensor that could sensitively detect the host odorants benzaldehyde. Meanwhile, the most related amino acids of OBPs that bind to host plant volatiles can be distinguished with molecular docking.

Originality/value

An olfactory biosensor was developed to explore interactions and mechanism between the pest OBPs and benzaldehyde, which showed promising potentials for small organic molecule sensing. Simultaneously, it might be helpful for novel pest control strategies.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Jon F Kirchoff, Wendy L Tate and Diane A Mollenkopf

Empirical research provides evidence that green supply chain management (SCM) practices positively impact firm performance. Yet, questions remain regarding how firms…

Abstract

Purpose

Empirical research provides evidence that green supply chain management (SCM) practices positively impact firm performance. Yet, questions remain regarding how firms configure their organizations and design green practices to achieve improved performance, especially in light of a constantly changing business environment. This research uses the resource-based and strategic choice theories to better understand the antecedent roles of two strategic orientations, supply chain orientation (SCO) and environmental orientation (EO), on both the implementation and outcomes of green SCM practices. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey responses from 367 supply chain managers are tested through structural equation modeling.

Findings

Findings suggest that a combination of SCO and EO capabilities positively influence the implementation of green SCM practices, and positively impact firm performance. Results also suggest that the capability bundle of SCO, EO, and green SCM should be adaptable to the changing business environment.

Originality/value

This research contributes through the combination of the resource-based theory, supported by strategic choice theory, to better understand how managers configure and re-configure valuable green-related capabilities to adapt to the constantly changing business environment.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Book part
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Leopold Ringel

Extant research conceptualizes rankings as measures that fundamentally shape modern life by virtue of being publicly available. Yet, studies seldom explore the act of…

Abstract

Extant research conceptualizes rankings as measures that fundamentally shape modern life by virtue of being publicly available. Yet, studies seldom explore the act of publishing when accounting for the attention rankings raise in larger stakeholder audiences. In short, we know a lot about the impact of rankings, but considerably less about the organizational practices devised by those who produce them – the rankers. Borrowing from Goffman, the paper conceptualizes modern rankings as public performances carefully prepared on backstages and unfolding on multiple frontstages. Using a qualitative data set, the paper traces the full spectrum of organizational practices that make rankings public performances: on the backstage, launch dates have to be set, numbers packaged, and “teams” prepared; on the frontstage, performances are held through face-to-face interactions (at launch events) as well as in a variety of mediated settings. Overall, the findings indicate that the more ranking organizations seek the attention of larger stakeholder audiences, the more the publication process is transformed into what one of the informants describes as “a big firework.”

Details

Worlds of Rankings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-106-9

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Mary Mindak and Wendy Heltzer

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between and corporate environmental responsibility (CER) and audit risk.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between and corporate environmental responsibility (CER) and audit risk.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey participation request was mailed to 5,008 US auditors at random. The request provided a link to an electronic survey. The final sample consists of anonymous responses from 163 auditors.

Findings

The authors find that auditors, on average, do not perceive a significant relationship between corporate environmental strengths and audit risk; however, they do perceive an increase in audit risk among firms with corporate environmental concerns. Use of CER in the risk assessment process also varies across types of CER: 15 per cent of auditors use corporate environmental strengths to assess audit risk, while 43 per cent of auditors use corporate environmental concerns to assess audit risk. Perception of the CER/audit risk relationship is a significant determinant of CER use. Finally, both types of CER are found to have average usefulness in the risk assessment process.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to US auditors; results may not be transferable to other countries.

Originality/value

Studies involving the impact of CER on earnings generally involve archival data. By examining the impact of CER on audit risk, using a unique dataset, the authors present a different and timely setting to study the CER/earnings relationship. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first paper to document the relationship between CER and audit risk.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2009

Irene E. De Pater, Annelies E.M. Van Vianen, Agneta H. Fischer and Wendy P. Van Ginkel

The purpose of this paper is to examine: gender differences in the choice to perform challenging tasks, gender differences in the actual performance of challenging tasks…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine: gender differences in the choice to perform challenging tasks, gender differences in the actual performance of challenging tasks, and the impact of challenging experiences on supervisors' evaluations of individuals' potential for career advancement.

Design/methodology/approach

In study 1, a sample of 158 students participated in a laboratory study that examined gender differences in choosing to perform challenging tasks in a situation that stressed individual performance. In study 2, a sample of 93 interns completed questionnaires in which the authors measured their challenging job experiences. Interns' supervisors evaluated interns' potential for career advancement.

Findings

In an achievement situation, women chose to perform fewer challenging tasks than men (study 1). During their internships, females had fewer challenging job experiences than males (study 2). Having challenging experiences was positively related to supervisors' evaluations of interns' potential for career advancement (study 2).

Research limitations/implications

The use of student samples may be considered a limitation of these studies. However, the nature of the research questions justifies an initial examination among students. Moreover, small gender differences in experiences at the start of individuals' careers may ultimately lead to increasing discrepancies between men's and women's careers.

Originality/value

The study is the first to examine individuals' own impact on the extent to which they experience job challenge. Moreover, it is the first that empirically examines the relationship between job challenge and evaluations of career potential.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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