Search results

1 – 10 of over 59000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 March 2021

Poonam Mehta

In the service industry, there is an involvement of the human factor which comprises continuous interpersonal interactions. Sometimes, these interactions create…

Abstract

Purpose

In the service industry, there is an involvement of the human factor which comprises continuous interpersonal interactions. Sometimes, these interactions create incongruence between displayed and felt emotions which distract the employees from their authentic self and impair their well-being. This paper aims to made an attempt to review different studies to identify an association between authenticity at the workplace and employee well-being with reference to emotional work.

Design/methodology/approach

The different studies have been reviewed mentioning the association between authenticity at the workplace and employee well-being with reference to emotional work published during the period of 1983–2020. The database which is used to identify and extract the research papers includes APA PycNET, Business Perspectives, Elsevier, Emerald Insight, Inderscience Publishers, SAGE, Taylor and Francis, etc. The keywords used for shortlisting the studies include employee well-being, emotional work, emotional dissonance, job satisfaction, surface acting, authenticity, burnout, authentic living, self-alienation.

Findings

The study has determined that emotional work influences the authenticity of an employee which further impacts the well-being of employees.

Research limitations/implications

The present review would aid the researchers in explaining the relevance of authenticity at the workplace for enhancing the employee well-being specifically in emotional work settings.

Social implications

Promoting well-being at the workplace requires an action-oriented approach from the national level also. Hence, the present study may help in drawing inferences for framing well-being policies for employees at the national level.

Originality/value

The paper is amongst the few reviews which have analysed the substantial role of authenticity in the context of emotional work to improve employee well-being.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Mauricio Losada-Otálora, Nathalie Peña-García and Iván D. Sánchez

This paper aims to explore the effects of interpersonal conflicts in the social workplace on various rationalized, knowledge-hiding behaviors in service organizations…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the effects of interpersonal conflicts in the social workplace on various rationalized, knowledge-hiding behaviors in service organizations. This research also examines employee well-being as a mediator to explain the effects of interpersonal conflicts at work on knowledge-hiding behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

First, relevant literature provided the theoretical basis for the conceptual model that links the core constructs of this research. A quantitative study collected data from 395 employees of a global consulting firm with a branch located in a developing country. Finally, an analysis of the structural equation modeling with MPlus 7 software tested the measurement and the structural model.

Findings

The results of this study suggest that interpersonal conflict at work influences knowledge-hiding and that employee’s well-being mediates this relationship. In other words, employees strategically choose what knowledge-hiding behaviors to use – such as evasion or “playing dumb” – to cope with the lack of well-being caused by high interpersonal conflicts in the workplace.

Originality/value

Although contextual and individual factors may trigger knowledge-hiding behavior at work, the current literature has overlooked the combined effects of such factors, especially in service settings. Knowledge hiding in service organizations is a weakness that can lead to significant economic losses, especially in firms that are intensively knowledge-based. Thus, it is necessary to identify the antecedents of knowledge-hiding behavior to deter low performance in these organizations.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Jill Miller

The purpose of this paper is to position well-being as a necessary component of the productivity debate and highlights the need for a deeper understanding of the nature of…

Downloads
1535

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to position well-being as a necessary component of the productivity debate and highlights the need for a deeper understanding of the nature of such a link. It first considers productivity at the national level in order to show how this affects both the climate and the economic policies within which organisations operate.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents an overview of current research and practice in the area. It treats the organisation as the primary level of analysis, and before highlights some of the apparent challenges in conceptualising well-being.

Findings

The importance of well-being is rising up national and employer agendas. Organisations need people to perform at their best in a sustainable way. The paper argues that an organisation with well-being at its core will reap productivity gains. It supports the view in the literature that improvements at national level can only be made on the back of sophisticated strategies across numerous organisations. However, for this to happen shared actions and understanding of these challenges has first to be created and acted upon across institutions and organisations. There are notable costs of poor well-being to productivity, and identifiable benefits of promoting and supporting employee well-being for productivity.

Practical implications

There is a clear practice implementation gap. Some organisations are embracing the opportunities to invest in their staff, but those who make employee well-being a business priority and a fundamental part of how the organisation operates are in the minority. There is also an ongoing challenge of measuring the impact of well-being programmes which can inform ROI assessments and enable organisations to demonstrate the business benefits of employee well-being.

Originality/value

There remain many unanswered questions about both the nature of the link between well-being and productivity and the economic impact of an association. This paper sparks further interest in expanding the understanding of the well-being and productivity link or peripheral issues.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2019

Vijay Kuriakose, Sreejesh S., P.R. Wilson and Anusree MR

The purpose of this study is to examine the differential association of three different workplace conflicts on employee-related outcomes, such as loneliness and well-being

Downloads
1595

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the differential association of three different workplace conflicts on employee-related outcomes, such as loneliness and well-being. Further, the study pursues to explore the perceived social support at the workplace as a conditional factor in the relation between different conflict types and employee loneliness.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected using a self-administered survey from 554 IT employees. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to test the study postulations.

Findings

The findings indicated that all three types of conflicts differently associate on both loneliness and well-being. Besides, it found that loneliness works as a mediator between conflict types and employee well-being. Further, perceived social support at the workplace moderates the relationship between different types of conflict, such as relationship, process, task conflicts and employee loneliness at work.

Practical implications

The study provides helpful directions to HR managers by providing a clear empirical understanding of the types of conflicts and its association on employee-related outcomes. Further, the study highlights the need for developing social support in an organisation during conflict episodes, to manage the adverse association of these conflicts on employee well-being and to restore employee well-being.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, for the first time, a study has been conducted highlighting the differential association of workplace conflict and employee outcome and indicating its intervening mechanisms and conflict management conditions.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Nicole Renee Baptiste

This paper aims to critically examine the dynamics of fun and well‐being at work, as experienced and perceived by senior managers in a public sector context.

Downloads
4040

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to critically examine the dynamics of fun and well‐being at work, as experienced and perceived by senior managers in a public sector context.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on research into well‐being with a British Local Authority, focusing on 12 senior managers through verbal accounts of their own experiences and perceptions of fun initiatives.

Findings

The data reveal that managers were not having “fun”. However, well‐being at work emerged as central to influencing and enabling “fun at work” and was strongly linked to eight organisational factors (Working Time Arrangements; Stress Management; Communication Strategies; Reward Strategies; Management Development; Team Working; Relationships with Stakeholders; Clarification and Reduction in Change Initiatives). Thus whilst “Fun at work” prescriptions are common in the literature, findings from these accounts indicate people might be happier to experience better well‐being at work.

Research limitations/implications

Senior managers’ accounts of well‐being identified salient issues, thus providing a basis for broader research in this area.

Practical implications

Attention to the material aspects of employment relations is recommended over ‘silly hat day’ prescriptions. Organisations wishing to enhance fun at work could focus efforts on creating organisational conditions that encourage well‐being through the eight identified factors. This has relevance for the employment relationship, and for practitioners and academics alike.

Originality/value

This study makes a distinctive contribution to the fun at work literature by providing rich empirical data, and extending the “tenets of fun” to consider an alternative conceptualisation of “well‐being at work” instead of the organised/managed fun activities presently embraced in the literature.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Julie Ménard and Luc Brunet

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the link between authenticity at work and well‐being. First, the relationship between authenticity at work and hedonic and…

Downloads
5448

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the link between authenticity at work and well‐being. First, the relationship between authenticity at work and hedonic and eudemonic well‐being indexes is assessed. Second, the mediating role of meaning of work in the relationship between authenticity at work and subjective well‐being at work is investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 360 managers from public organizations completed self‐reported questionnaires. Multiple hierarchical regressions were used to assess the hypotheses.

Findings

Cognitive and behavioral components of authenticity at work explained a significant proportion of variance in each hedonic and eudemonic well‐being indexes. Authenticity is positively associated with well‐being at work. Moreover, meaning of work is a partial mediator of the relationship between authenticity and subjective well‐being at work.

Practical implications

The results suggest that meaning of work is a mechanism in the relationship between authenticity and subjective well‐being at work. The study highlighted a growing need to promote authenticity within organizations since it has been associated with public managers' well‐being.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study showing the positive relationship between authenticity and well‐being in the workplace amongst public organizations managers. It sheds a very new light on the importance of authenticity in work settings and on how it could be linked to meaningfulness in managerial roles.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Nimitha Aboobaker, Manoj Edward and K.A. Zakkariya

This study aims to examine the influence of workplace spirituality on employee loyalty toward the organization, mediated through well-being at work. Furthermore, the study…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the influence of workplace spirituality on employee loyalty toward the organization, mediated through well-being at work. Furthermore, the study endeavors to test the difference in conceptual model estimates, across two groups of employees: those who work on contract/temporary and permanent basis. The study gains relevance particularly in the context of the emerging sharing economy, where jobs are primarily characterized by short-term contracts and freelancing.

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive study was conducted among a sample of 523 educators working in private educational institutions in India. Self-reporting questionnaires were administered among the respondents, who were selected through the purposive sampling method. Structural equation modeling and multi-group analysis were done to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The analysis revealed that workplace spirituality enriched employee well-being and loyalty toward the organization and evidence were found for indirect effects too. Variances were observed in the relationships, with respect to the different employment statuses of the personnel. Significant differences in the relationships were not found across temporary and permanent employment statuses. Interestingly, temporary employees experienced stronger influences between meaningful work, well-being and word-of-mouth. Results suggest the relevance of understanding employees' differential work experiences and attitudes and thus facilitate human resource strategies accordingly.

Originality/value

This study is pioneering in conceptualizing and testing a theoretical model linking workplace spirituality, well-being at work and employee loyalty, particularly in the context of employees who differ in their employment status, which is a critical aspect of modern-day organizations. Unlike traditional workplaces, in recent times, people come together and work along for shorter terms, as the case of a sharing economy and the thus emergent interpersonal dynamics between each other and with the workplace has significant repercussions on the organization. Theoretical and managerial implications with regard to the experience of workplace spirituality and job outcomes are elaborated, thus striving to fill a gap in the existing literature.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Nicole Renee Cvenkel

This chapter critically examines the dynamics that exists between employee well-being, line management leadership and governance as experienced and perceived by employees…

Abstract

This chapter critically examines the dynamics that exists between employee well-being, line management leadership and governance as experienced and perceived by employees in the public sector context. This chapter is based on research into employee well-being and line management leadership with a British Local Authority in northern England, focusing on employees’ verbal accounts of their own experiences and perceptions of well-being, line manager leadership and corporate social responsibility. Twenty-six interviews were conducted from a diverse range of employees with each interview lasting (45–60 minutes), tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. The research investigated the subjective perceptions of senior managers, managers, senior officers and clerical/secretarial staff regarding their views concerning line management leadership on employee well-being at work. Using the technique of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) provided insight into the life-world of participants, providing the opportunity for employees to share their personal experience of leadership and governance on the front line and its implication for employee well-being at work. The data revealed line management leadership and governance emerged as central to influencing and enabling well-being at work and were linked to individual, social and organisational factors (blame culture, rewards, trust in management, support and communication). Employees’ accounts of line management leadership, well-being and corporate social responsibility identified salient issues, thus providing a basis for broader research in this area. Thus organisations wishing to enhance employee well-being could focus efforts on creating organisational conditions and line management leadership to encourage well-being through the six identified factors. This research has relevance for the employment relationship, corporate social responsibility, service delivery, performance and for practitioners and academics alike.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Nimitha Aboobaker, Manoj Edward and Zakkariya K.A.

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of workplace spirituality on employee well-being and intention to stay with the organization among teachers in…

Downloads
1707

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of workplace spirituality on employee well-being and intention to stay with the organization among teachers in technical higher education institutions. Furthermore, the study endeavors to test the difference in model estimates across two groups of teachers who differ in their intentional career choice.

Design/methodology/approach

This descriptive study was conducted amongst a sample of 523 teachers working in technical educational institutions in India. Self-reporting questionnaires were administered among the respondents, who were selected through purposive sampling method. Structural equation modeling and multi-group analysis were done to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Analysis revealed that workplace spirituality enhanced employee well-being and intention to stay. Differences were observed on the effects of different dimensions of workplace spirituality on job outcomes. Also, teachers’ intentional career choice was found to moderate these relationships.

Originality/value

This study is pioneering in conceptualizing and testing a theoretical model linking workplace spirituality, employee well-being and intention to stay, particularly in the context of teachers who differ in their intentional career choice. Implications with regard to the experience of workplace spirituality and job outcomes in the specific context of teaching are elaborated, thus striving to fill a gap in existing literature.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

Frank Martela

What makes employees feel well within an organization? The aim of the present chapter is to start from a paradigm that emphasizes human relationality, affectivity, and…

Abstract

What makes employees feel well within an organization? The aim of the present chapter is to start from a paradigm that emphasizes human relationality, affectivity, and intersubjective systems, and accordingly focuses on how well-being is emerging from contextual interrelations between employees. Applying this perspective to a qualitative study of nurses in a nursing home, I came to see the work community as a well-being-generating system in which the well-being of individual members is constructed together as an ongoing social accomplishment. In addition, I identified four systemic processes within the work community that greatly influence the well-being-generating capacity of the system.

Details

Emotions and the Organizational Fabric
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-939-3

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 59000