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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2022

Rachel Gaines and Vinod Vincent

Given the prevalence of obesity in society at large and ensuing weight discrimination in the workplace, the purpose of this paper is to bring to light the social stigma…

278

Abstract

Purpose

Given the prevalence of obesity in society at large and ensuing weight discrimination in the workplace, the purpose of this paper is to bring to light the social stigma attached to obesity, stimulate the discussion around enacting better legislation to alleviate weight-based discrimination in the workplace and highlight the role of human resource (HR) departments in preventing such discriminatory actions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews current perceptions, trends, laws and consequences related to obesity and weight discrimination and discusses the implications for organizations and HR professionals.

Findings

Weight discrimination is a real problem in society as a whole and workplaces in particular. HR professionals have a key role to play in removing weight discrimination and creating a more inclusive and equitable workplace.

Originality/value

Although weight discrimination has significant professional and personal consequences, there is a lack of explicit laws and policies that provide strong protection to impacted individuals. This paper brings the issue to light and discusses the role of HR in eliminating such bias and discriminatory practices in the workplace.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1971

E. TORENBEEK

A semi‐empirical relationship is derived for the structural weight of wings, applicable to a wide range of subsonic aircraft. The method is based on a generalized…

Abstract

A semi‐empirical relationship is derived for the structural weight of wings, applicable to a wide range of subsonic aircraft. The method is based on a generalized expression for the material required to resist the root bending moment due to wing lift in a specified flight condition. Appropriate factors make the result applicable to cantilever and braced wings, for passenger and general aviation aircraft and for freighters. An assessment of the accuracy, based on actual wing weights of 46 aircraft, indicates that a standard deviation of 9·64 per cent is achieved. The weight formula presented allows for the effects of variations in the main wing dimensions and operational limits of the airplane and is therefore suited to parametric design studies.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 43 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1935

Masaiti Kondô

ALL the performances as well as the strength of an aeroplane are reduced by overloading or increase in gross weight. But, apart from the strength considerations, the…

Abstract

ALL the performances as well as the strength of an aeroplane are reduced by overloading or increase in gross weight. But, apart from the strength considerations, the maximum take‐off weight permissible for the aeroplane probably determines the final limit of overloading, because the aeroplane must at least fly off the ground into the air.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 7 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

J. Ravichandran

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new approach in which cost‐based process weights are used to determine a unique weighted‐defects per million opportunity (DPMO…

1105

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new approach in which cost‐based process weights are used to determine a unique weighted‐defects per million opportunity (DPMO) and its corresponding overall sigma level in order to classify an organization as either “world‐class,” “industry average” or “non‐competitive.”

Design/methodology/approach

In order to achieve this objective, the proposed approach uses both internal and external performances of the products and processes in terms of costs involved to determine cost‐based process weights. These weights are then incorporated into the respective DPMOs for computing weighted‐DPMOs. Finally, a unique weighted‐DPMO and its corresponding sigma level are found.

Findings

The proposed method is a new one and it involves various costs for determining process weights. The findings reveal that the weight‐based overall sigma level is more realistic than the one that is calculated without weights. Further, the results of this study could provide interesting feedback to six‐sigma practitioners, as they are particular about DPMOs and return on investments in project implementations.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this paper are based on the weights of respective processes and their products that are calculated using various cost aspects. Determining such weights by means of any other process and product factors incorporating the effects of various marketing activities, if any, could extend its generality and fulfil the gap.

Practical implications

The proposed method is simple to implement and the required data can be collected without any additional commitments. Also, it is more generic so that it can be adapted by organizations of any nature. This paper recommends change in the practice from simply using the DPMOs with equal importance to using the weight‐based DPMOs for evaluating overall sigma level (performance) of an organization.

Originality/value

The proposed approach would have a high value among six‐sigma quality practitioners and researchers as it provides a new and more realistic measure for overall performance of an organization during the evaluation process.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Camilla Haw and Jean Stubbs

Patients in secure units are at high risk of obesity because of antipsychotic medication, restrictions on freedom, and poor motivation to eat healthily and exercise. The…

2091

Abstract

Purpose

Patients in secure units are at high risk of obesity because of antipsychotic medication, restrictions on freedom, and poor motivation to eat healthily and exercise. The aim of this paper is to investigate how consultant forensic psychiatrists address weight management, particularly with respect to inpatients.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a review of the literature, a structured questionnaire was developed and piloted locally. After revising the questionnaire, it was sent to all 442 consultant psychiatrists listed by the Royal College of Psychiatrists as having a special interest in forensic psychiatry.

Findings

A total of 183 usable questionnaires were returned (response rate 45.9 per cent). Most respondents monitored patients' weight and had some access to a dietitian. Respondents rated a median of 40 per cent of their inpatients as obese. A total of 68.9 per cent said their patients did not have unrestricted access to food. Use of weight loss drugs such as orlistat was infrequent. A few patients had been referred for bariatric surgery but most had been judged unsuitable.

Research limitations/implications

The responses reported in this paper are based on participants' self‐report and have not been confirmed by independent observation. Further research is needed to determine which weight loss measures are effective for psychiatric patients in real‐life situations.

Practical implications

Obesity appears to be common among forensic inpatients despite weight monitoring, dietetic interventions and exercise programmes. Comprehensive and continuing efforts are needed to help patients lose weight and lead healthier lifestyles.

Originality/value

This survey reports on clinicians' views and clinical practice.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1950

J.F. Carreyette

Several empirical and semi‐empirical formulae exist for predicting wing weights, and it is the purpose of this note to summarize the results of a study of accuracy…

Abstract

Several empirical and semi‐empirical formulae exist for predicting wing weights, and it is the purpose of this note to summarize the results of a study of accuracy associated with some of these methods, with a view to establishing their comparative reliability. The modus operandi for effecting this has been to collect together the weights of wing structures which have actually been weighed, thus giving values of true wing weight, and to use each formula or method to ‘predict’ the weights of the same wings, and then to compare the estimated results with the true wing weights. Deviations between the true and estimated values have been tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis and the comparative measures of accuracy derived from that analysis.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Qian Li

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and rank the influence of internet public opinion of China’s Government work in 2015 by weighted absolute degree of grey incidence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and rank the influence of internet public opinion of China’s Government work in 2015 by weighted absolute degree of grey incidence with TOPSIS.

Design/methodology/approach

This disaggregation method includes four main steps, determine the vector of weights for the factors by analytic hierarchy process, calculate the matrix of consistent effect measure, determine the weighted absolute degree of grey incidence with TOPSIS, rank and evaluate the events.

Findings

We get the ranking of internet public opinion of China’s Government work in 2015 by weighted absolute degree of grey incidence with TOPSIS. The result can be used for evaluating and ranking the influence of internet public opinion in China. The positive weighted absolute degree of grey incidence, the negative weighted absolute degree of grey incidence and the weighted absolute degree of grey incidence with TOPSIS have the same ranking results. The same ranking results show that the method of weighted absolute degree of grey incidence with TOPSIS has good consistency.

Practical implications

The weighted absolute degree of grey incidence with TOPSIS can be easily used for other evaluation.

Originality/value

The weighted absolute degree of grey incidence with TOPSIS is proposed and first used for evaluating and ranking the influence of internet public opinion of China’s Government work.

Details

Grey Systems: Theory and Application, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-9377

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Jacob K. Eskildsen, Kai Kristensen and Hans Jørn Juhl

This paper examines the criterion weights of the EFQM excellence model. More and more research indicates that the official criterion weights from EFQM do not correspond…

1115

Abstract

This paper examines the criterion weights of the EFQM excellence model. More and more research indicates that the official criterion weights from EFQM do not correspond with the way companies are working. This, of course, raises the question whether or not it makes any sense to compare companies according to an arbitrary weight structure, which has never been empirically tested? In this paper the criterion weights are estimated through the use of a factor scores regression based on confirmatory factor analysis of a number of bootstrapped samples. This estimation procedure is applied on data collected among Danish companies which responded to a self‐assessment questionnaire covering the EFQM excellence model in each of the years 1998‐2001. The overall conclusions are that the allocation of weights is fairly stable for most of the criteria except for one. The weight allocated to “People results” is significantly lower in 2001 than in 1999 and 1998.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2010

Ken Johnston, John Hatem and Thomas A. Carnes

Most investors' retirement portfolios have inter‐period cash inflows. The standard time‐weighted mean return (or geometric mean return) is generally used to report returns…

628

Abstract

Purpose

Most investors' retirement portfolios have inter‐period cash inflows. The standard time‐weighted mean return (or geometric mean return) is generally used to report returns on investors' retirement portfolios. The purpose of this paper is to examine the standard time‐weighted mean return and point out additional deficiencies in the time‐weighted mean in this situation, which have not been addressed in the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides examples that point out additional deficiencies that arise using geometric mean returns as estimates of an individual investor's performance.

Findings

With inter‐period cash flows the dollar‐weighted return can be affected by both timing and the sequence of the asset return series even if the investor has constant inflows or outflows of capital. In contrast for these same asset return arrays, the time‐weighted mean return measure may be unaffected by these important variations in the return arrays, and thus may misrepresent actual investor results. This is an important point that has not been addressed in the literature.

Originality/value

With inter‐period cash flows the dollar‐weighted return can be affected by both timing and the sequence of the asset return series even if the investor has constant inflows or outflows of capital. In contrast for these same asset return arrays, the time‐weighted mean return measure may be unaffected by these important variations in the return arrays, and thus may misrepresent actual investor results. This is an important point that has not been addressed in the literature.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

C.H.S. Ruxton, F. Hinton and C.E.L. Evans

Aims to carry out a consumer intervention study to evaluate the impact of an over‐the‐counter herbal weight management product (Zotrim®) on weight and waist circumference.

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to carry out a consumer intervention study to evaluate the impact of an over‐the‐counter herbal weight management product (Zotrim®) on weight and waist circumference.

Design/methodology/approach

Overweight women were recruited using local media and 61 passed initial screening to begin a four‐week intervention using a free sample of Zotrim at a dosage corresponding to manufacturers’ recommendations. A total of 56 subjects completed the study, but data on all 61 were included in the “intention to treat” analysis.

Findings

There was a self‐reported mean weight loss of 1.79kg (0.45kg per week) at week 4. Data on perceived hunger and fullness from three sets of questionnaires suggested that subjects felt less hungry between meals and fuller after meals at weeks 1 and 4 compared with base‐line. This is likely to have impacted on energy intake and may account for the weight loss. Average weight loss as a percentage of baseline was 2.3 per cent, but this masked a broad range, suggesting that some subjects benefited more than others. Taking into account adjusted guidelines for clinically significant weight loss, 23 per cent of subjects achieved this cut‐off, suggesting that their risk of chronic disease had reduced. Similarly, waist circumference (an independent measure of disease risk) decreased by an average of 4.3cm during the four‐week period. This reduced the number of subjects exceeding SIGN guidelines for central obesity from 93 per cent to 83 per cent.

Originality/value

Adds to the body of knowledge by proring that Zotrim can aid weight loss and help reduce waist circumference.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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