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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Wee-Kheng Tan and Bo-Yuan Lee

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the credibility assessment and adoption of electronic word-of-mouth on online social-networking sites, social word-of-mouth…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the credibility assessment and adoption of electronic word-of-mouth on online social-networking sites, social word-of-mouth (sWOM), where the author writes product reviews on Facebook and hopes their Facebook friends will buy these products. The readers of the sWOM message are aware of the author’s commercial intentions. sWOM messages on search goods and experience goods are considered separately.

Design/methodology/approach

Author of sWOM messages invites their closed circle of Facebook friends to participate in a survey. The respondents are randomly assigned to read a product review of a search good (i.e. a laptop computer) or an experience good (i.e. a moisturizer cream (beauty product)). The partial least squares method is used to analyze the data from 339 returns (166 for the search good and 173 for the experience good).

Findings

The sWOM readers’ assessments of the messages’ credibility remain free from commercial influence. While the traditional factors of credibility and author-reader tie strength continue to influence the adoption of sWOM message, readers’ perceptions of the sWOM author’s marketing skills is also a factor. The relationships between the constructs depend on whether the products are search or experience goods.

Originality/value

Few studies investigate the type of sWOM considered here. Commercially influenced sWOM messages are effective since the author’s marketing skills, and other often-cited factors, affect the credibility and adoption of sWOM. Thus, the equality-matching (friendship) relationship and the market-pricing (sales) relationship can work hand-in-hand in the sWOM context.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2018

Wee Kheng Tan

The purpose of this paper is to consider issues related to gamification through the non-game aquarium context and explore how the intention of aquarium visitors to play a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider issues related to gamification through the non-game aquarium context and explore how the intention of aquarium visitors to play a game that imparts knowledge about marine animals and promotes the conservation of these animals is influenced by visitors’ attitudes toward marine animals, motivations to visit the aquarium and perceptions of the game’s benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveyed individuals who have visited Taiwan’s National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium at least once in the past three years and who use smartphones. They were shown a description of a hypothetical game scenario that they were asked to imagine to be available while at the aquarium. The partial least squares method was used to analyze the data from 225 returns.

Findings

The study shows that gamification can satisfy a visitor’s desire to learn and enjoy the aquarium simultaneously. Gamification is limited by the visit motivation and the attitudes toward marine animals that visitors bring with them. The usefulness of gamification is limited when visitors desire relaxation during the visit.

Originality/value

This study considers the application of gamification in the context of aquariums and the tourism field and the non-technology-related antecedents to the use of gamification. Gamification is not silver bullet for every situation, and a good understanding of potential users is important for its success and targeting of players. The importance of intrinsic benefits over extrinsic benefits is confirmed. Thus, this study addresses several gaps in the gamification literature.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Wee Kheng Tan and Hao-Jen Liang

To alleviate the effects of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on the economy, Taiwan introduced a stimulus package in the form of triple stimulus vouchers. Despite…

Abstract

Purpose

To alleviate the effects of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on the economy, Taiwan introduced a stimulus package in the form of triple stimulus vouchers. Despite intense promotion to opt for the vouchers in digital form, Taiwanese public overwhelmingly chose the paper form. This study considers the reasons that influenced their decision comfort in choosing paper rather than digital vouchers based on two categories: rational (promotion depth and ease of use) and behavioral economics factors (analysis paralysis, mental accounting related to ease of tracking expenses, social influence and payment habits).

Design/methodology/approach

Partial least squares (PLS) method was utilized to analyze survey information obtained from 183 individuals who chose paper vouchers.

Findings

Individuals consider rational and behavioral economic factors in their perception of decision comfort while choosing paper over digital vouchers. Decision comfort is driven more by behavioral economics than rational factors such as ease of use. Interestingly, analysis paralysis related to paper vouchers has the greatest impact, but it positively influences decision comfort, indicating that Taiwanese people view paper vouchers as a safe haven in the midst of uncertainties and information overload. Therefore, when designing public policies or promotional campaigns, possible behavior outcomes should be considered from both rational and behavioral economic perspectives.

Originality/value

This study provides insights into the dynamics of how individuals arrive at their decision of opting paper vouchers over digital ones and offers theoretical contributions related to system adoption and behavioral economics.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Hsiang-Lan Cheng, Tung-Ching Lin, Wee-Kheng Tan and Chao-Min Chiu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the complex relationships between permeability, work-family conflict, moral disengagement, behavioral disengagement, job strain and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the complex relationships between permeability, work-family conflict, moral disengagement, behavioral disengagement, job strain and job engagement. In addition, this study aims to determine whether moral disengagement acts as a moderator and mediator in the relationship between work-family conflict and behavioral disengagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply partial least squares structural equation modeling to test the hypotheses, using a sample of 176 valid responses.

Findings

The results indicate that permeability is likely to promote work-family conflict, which in turn may trigger moral disengagement. Moral disengagement may lead to behavioral disengagement, which in turn may increase job strain and decrease job engagement. The findings also show that work-family conflict does not have a significant effect on behavioral disengagement, suggesting that moral disengagement fully mediates the influence of work-family conflict on behavioral disengagement. In addition, the moderating effect of moral disengagement is not significant.

Originality/value

Applying the transactional model of stress and coping theory and the moral disengagement theory, this study contributes to a better understanding of employees' experience of job strain caused by work-family conflict (induced by permeability of IM usage), as well as the employee's coping response.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 45 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2020

Wee Kheng Tan and Kuan-Ju Lu

The impact of smartphone use at tourist destinations on the relationship of travel companions and trip satisfaction remains unclear. This study considers differences in…

Abstract

Purpose

The impact of smartphone use at tourist destinations on the relationship of travel companions and trip satisfaction remains unclear. This study considers differences in relational outcomes arising from smartphone use to kill time and reduce boredom during leisure travel with different companions, either family or friends, and uses the Riva's emotion regulation model to examine whether such smartphone use provides immediate relief from ostracism.

Design/methodology/approach

Partial least square (PLS) method and PLS multigroup analysis were used to analyze the data collected from 205 Taiwanese tourists (104 respondents vacationing with friends and 101 respondents with family).

Findings

This study found no negative effect of smartphone use to kill time and reduce boredom on relationship satisfaction and overall trip satisfaction. Smartphone use is rather limited as a contributor to trip satisfaction, and the effect of smartphone use depends on who the tourists are traveling with. The results reflect the effect of the established position of smartphones in everyday life, extending to tourism. The use of smartphones to kill time and avoid boredom is not a sufficiently “active” activity to serve as an effective immediate response to ostracism.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the continuing debate on the impact of new technologies on social relations. Although past studies have examined the relational outcomes of smartphone use, few have investigated this subject in the context of different travel companions. Using Riva's emotion regulation model, this study considers smartphone use as a possible response to ostracism.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Wee Kheng Tan and Shih‐Kuo Chen

The point of sale (POS) e‐micropayment program is undergoing a revival in Taiwan. Local banks are co‐operating with organizations which have existing captive markets to…

Abstract

Purpose

The point of sale (POS) e‐micropayment program is undergoing a revival in Taiwan. Local banks are co‐operating with organizations which have existing captive markets to issue e‐wallet smart cards. Such co‐operation reflects the restriction imposed by Taiwan's Banking Act and the very high density of convenience stores in Taiwan. The paper aims to help researchers and the program's operators to understand the dynamics influencing such a revival.

Design/methodology/approach

An extended Post‐acceptance Model of IS Continuance incorporating network externality is used and the roles of factors such as perceived usefulness and network externality are determined through hypothesis testing.

Findings

The study shows that these programs have good potential to succeed even though consumers' choice on whether transport‐related or convenience store‐related card has highest potential to succeed differs in different parts of Taiwan. Network externality cannot be ignored and contributes to Taiwan consumers' choice on the program which has the highest potential to succeed.

Practical implications

The paper's findings clearly advise the program's operators that their priority is to get more outlets to participate in these programs.

Originality/value

The paper shows how external factors such as regulatory restriction, retail structure affect the program's development and how the roles of network externality are subsequently affected.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Wee-Kheng Tan and Yun-Ghang Chang

The purpose of this paper is to use a familiarity and psychological distance framework to investigate the effects of psychological distance (responsibility distance and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use a familiarity and psychological distance framework to investigate the effects of psychological distance (responsibility distance and temporal distance) and destination familiarity on electronic-word-of-mouth (eWOM) consumption in the tourism context. The performance of eWOM is compared with that of traditional-word-of-mouth (tWOM) and the web site of the destination marketing organisation (DMO).

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment approach was used to collect the relevant data. For each of the eight scenarios generated by varying psychological distance dimensions and destination familiarity levels, 200 participants rated the extent that they would use eWOM, tWOM and the DMO web site to search for attraction and local transport information. The data were analysed using 2×2×2 within-subject ANOVA and t-test.

Findings

The analysis highlighted the versatility of eWOM in different psychological distances and familiarity levels. By and large, eWOM performs better than the DMO web site but is on par with tWOM. The advantages of eWOM over tWOM are meaningful under certain circumstances. Despite sharing a common psychological basis, psychological distance dimensions affect information search differently, and the effects are shaped by the types of tourism products being searched. When psychological distance, destination familiarity, tourism products and information sources are considered in totality, a complex picture of their relationship with intensity of information search is shown.

Originality/value

This study bridged the research gap by increasing our understanding of the performance of eWOM under different psychological distances and familiarity levels. The study also provides some suggestions for DMOs to leverage on eWOM and to improve the standing of DMO web site as a tourism information source.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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